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Full text of "West Wales historical records. Annual magazine of the Historical Society of West Wales"

a£NEAi-OGY coLLEdrridil 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01745 3959 



GENEALOGY 

942.9 

W52 

V.9 



WEST WALES 
HISTORICAL RECORDS 



West Wales 
Historical Records 

The Annual Magazine 

OF 

Cfte IJ)i0toticai ^ocietp of rae0t 2Bales 

Vol. IX. 1920-23. 



EDITED BY 

FRANCIS GREEN 



Jfe* 



CARMARTHEN : 

PRINTED BY W. SPURRELL & SON 

1923. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Annual Meeting of the *'*°* 

Society . . . . . . . . vii. 

Laws of the Society . . . . . . viii. 

List of Members . . . . . . ix. 

The Quakers of Pembrokeshire . . . . i 

Parish Registers : Baptisms at St. Peter's, 

Carmarthen . , . . . . . . 33 

Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days . . 67 

ScuRLOCK OF Carmarthen . . . . 135 

Scourfield of New Moat . . . . 145 

Marriage Bonds of West Wales and Gower 159 

Local History from a Printer's File . . 197 

Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670 . . . . 217 



A 



l^iBtortcal ^otietp of Witst Wialts. 



THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

An Annual Meeting of the Society was held in the Library of the 
Carmarthenshire Antiquarian Society's House, 5 Quay Street, Car- 
marthen, on the i2th November, 1921, the Rev. George Eyre Evans in 
the chair. 

The Secretary's Report (which recommended separating the office of 
Secretary from that of Editor) was received and adopted, and the 
accounts, which showed the following results, were approved : — 

BALANCE SHEET FOR THE PERIOD 1919— 21. 

Payments. 

£ s d 
To cost of printing An- 
nual Volume and other 
disbursments as certi- 
fied by the Hon. 
Auditor .. .. 149 12 10 



Receipts. 










£ 


s 


d 


By 90 Subscriptions . . 


94 


10 





By sale of first five 








Volumes 


5 


5 





By Donation (Hon. Miss 








A. L. Lewis . . 


I 


I 





By Amount received 








from Guarantors 


48 


16 


10 



£149 12 10 



;^I49 12 ID 



Fred J. Warren, Hon. Auditor. 

W. Owen, Lieut.-Col., Hon. Treasurer. 

T. J. Lewis, Hon. Deputy Treasurer. 

The following of&cers were elected : — 
President — Sir John Williams, Bart., K.C.V.O. 

Vice-Presidents. — The Right Hon. The Earl of Lisburne ; The Right 
Hon. Lord Dynevor ; The Right Hon. Lord Viscount St. Davids ; 
Lady Hills-Johnes ; Ladv Howard-Stepney; Sir Evan D. Jones, 
Bart. ; Sir Charles E. G. PhiUpps, Bart. ; Col. H. Davies-Evans ; F. 
D. Harford, Esq., C.V.O. ; Miss A. J. Stepney-Gulston, M.B.E. ; 
Sir J. Lynn Thomas, C.B. ; The Right Hon. Lord Kylsant, G.C.M.G. ; 
The Right Hon. Lord Merthyr; D. W. Brodie, Esq. 

Council. — The President ; The Vice-Presidents ; The Treasurer ; 
The Editor ; F. C. Egerton Allen, Esq. ; John Ballinger, Esq. ; G. R. 
Brigstocke, Esq. ; Capt. James Buckley ; Principal J. H. Davies ; The 
Rev. George Eyre Evans; Mrs. C O. Higgon; H. E. H. James, Esq. ; 
T. Y. Lewis, Esq. ; H. Meuric Lloyd, Esq. ; Richard LI. Lloyd, Esq. ; 
D. Lleufer Thomas, Esq. ; Herbert M. Vaughan, Esq. ; Fred. J. 
Warren, Esq. ; W. Llewelyn Williams, Esq. 

Editorial Committee. — John Ballinger, Esq.; G. R. Brigstocke, Esq. ; 
Principal J. H. Davies,; Sir E. D. Jones, Bart.; D. Lleufer 
Thomas, Esq. ; The Editor. 



VIU. 

Editor. — Francis Green, Glanymor, St. Davids, R.S.O., Pem. 

Treasurer. — Col. William Owen. 

Deputy Treasurer. — T. Y. Lewis, Esq. 

Auditor. — F. J. Warren, Esq. 

Secretary. — Principal David Salmon, Brynhryfyd, Narberth, Pem. 

LAWS. 

1. The Society shall be limited to 300 members, out of whom shall 
be elected a President, Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, Editor, and Sec- 
retary, and 15 other members (to be elected annually) of the Society, 
who shall form the Council, of whom four shall be a quorum. 

2. New members may be enrolled by the Secretary, but their elec- 
tion shall not be complete until it shall have been confirmed by the 
Council. 

3. The government of the Society shall be vested in the Council. 

4. Vice-Presidents, when once elected, shall hold the office so long 
as they continue members of the Society. The President shall be 
chosen for one year, but may be re-elected. 

5. There shall be an Editorial Committee, consisting of the Editor 
and five members, who shall superintend the publications of the Society, 
and shall report their proceedings annually to the Council. 

6. All members shall pay one guinea, in advance, on ist of March 
in each year to the Secretary, and members wishing to withdraw from 
the Society must give three months notice to the Secretary of such 
intention, and must pay up at the same time all arrears of subscriptions. 

7. All members whose subscriptions are not in arrear shall be en- 
titled to receive all publications of the Society, for the period covered 
by their subscriptions, except any special publications issued under 
its auspices. 

8. All subscriptions received shall at once be paid by the Secretary 
into Lloyd's Bank Limited, to the credit of the Treasurer, and all 
cheques shall be drawn by the Treasurer for the payment of biUs against 
the Society, and such bills shall be countersigned by the Secretary or 
Chairman of the Council, before they are paid by the Treasurer. 

9. The Council shall meet at least once a year to transact any busi- 
ness that may be brought before it, and the Chairman of the Council, 
shall have power to call a special meeting, of which a fortnight's notice 
shall be given to each member of the Council. 

10. A general annual meeting shall be held yearly, when the reports 
of the Council and officers of the Society shall be submitted, officers 
elected, any alteration of the laws approved, the accoimts audited, 
and any other business discussed and approved. 

11. Any member wishing to make an alteration in the laws must 
give one month's notice to the Secretary before the Annual Meeting, 
of his intention to move such a resolution, accompanied by a copy of 
such proposed resolution. 

12. A special meeting of the Council shall be convened by the Chair- 
man on the requisition of three members thereof, such meeting to be 
held within one calendar month from the date of the receipt of the 
requisition ; at least 14 days notice to be given, the special business 
to be stated on the circular convening the meeting and also in the re- 
quisition. 



MEMBERS. 

Allen, C. F. Egerton, Esq., Norton House, Tenby. 

Allen, H. Seymour, Esq., Cresselly, Begelly, Perns. 

Allen, W. Bird, Esq., 158 Portsdown Road, Maida Hill, London, W.g. 

Antiquaries, Society of, Burlington House, London, W.i. 

Ballinger, John, Esq., National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. 

Birmingham Public Libraries (Reference Department), Ratcliffe Place, 

Birmingham. 
Bowen, The Rev. Canon David, Monkton Priory, Pembroke. 
Bowen, George Bevan, Esq., Llwyngwair, Newport, R.S.O., Perns. 
Brigstocke. G. R., Esq., Robert's Rest, Ferryside, Carms. 
Bristol Muncipal Libraries (Central), Bristol. 
British Museum, London, W.C.i 
Brodie, W. W., Esq., Cheriton, Llanelly. 
Buckley, Capt. James, Claradme, Pendine, Carms. 
Cambridge University Library, Cambridge. 

Cardiff Public Libraries, Cardiff. (H. Farr, Esq., Chief Librarian). 
Carmarthenshire Antiquarian Society (per Walter Spurrell, Esq., King 

Street, Carmarthen). 
College of Arms, Queen Victoria Street, London, E.C.4. 
Congress, Library of, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. (per Messrs. G. E. Stec- 

hert and Co., 2 Star Yard, Carey St., Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2.) 
Davies, The Rev. Canon David, i High Street, Llandaff, Glam. 
Davies, Principal J. H., Cwm, Aberystwyth. 

Davies, Sir Joseph, 29 Chester Terrace, Regent's Park, London, N.W.i. 
Davies-Evans, Col. Herbert, Highmead, Llanybyther, Cards. 
Davies-Evans, Mrs. Mary E., Highmead, Llanybyther, Cards. 
Dynevor, The Right Hon. Lord, 15 Lower Berkeley St., Portman 

Square, London, W.i. 
Edinburgh Public Library, Edinburgh. 

Ellis, Miss Sarah J., National Provincial Bank, Narberth, Pems. 
Evans. Dr. Alban, 4 Northampton Place, Swansea. 
Evans, Sir E. Vincent, 64 Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 
Evans, Rev. George Eyre, Ty Tringad, Aberystwyth. 
Evans, The Rev. T. J., Stow-on- the- Wold, Gloucester. 
Evans, The Rev. William, The Rectory, Narberth, Pems. 
Gibbins, F. William, Esq., Garthmor, Neath, Glam. 
Green, Francis, Esq., Glanymor, St. Davids, Pems. 
Harford, Frederic Dundas, Esq., C.V.O., 49 Egerton Gardens, London, 

S.W.3. 
Harries, Henry F. W., Esq., Woodside, Brecon. 
Harvard College Library (per Messrs. Edw. G. Allen & Sons, Ltd., 12 

Grape Street, Shaftesbury Avenue, London, W.C.2.) 
Hemp, Wilfred J., Esq., Ancient Monuments Board for Wales, H.M. 

Office of Works, Storey Gate, London, S.W.i. 
Higgon, Mrs. C. O., M.B.E., Treffgarne Hall, Treffgarne, Pems. 
Hills-Johnes, Lady, Dolaucothy, Llanwrda, Carms. 
Hinds, John, Esq., 71 Ashley Gardens, London, S.W.2. 
Hope, Miss Evelyn E., Pigeonsford, Llangranog, Henllan, Cards. 
Howard- Stepney, Lady, Cilymaenllwyd, Llanelly. 
James, H. E. H., Esq., Brynpaith, Aberystwyth, Cards. 
James, William, Esq., 10 Portland Street, Swansea. 



X. 

John, Edward T., Esq., Llanidan Hall, Llanfair PwUgwyngyll, Angle- 
sey. 
Jones, Sir E. D., Bart., Pentower, Fishguard, Ferns. 
Jones, James, Esq., Sohcitor, Llandyssul, Cards. 
Kylsant, The Right Hon. Lord, Coombe, Llangain, Carm. 
Lawrence, The Rev. R. Gwynne, Clearbrook, Llanarthney, Carms. 
Leeds Public Libraries, Leeds. 

Lewis, The Hon. Miss A. L., The Hill, Abergavenny, Mon. 
Lewis, Professor D. Morgan, Iscoed, Caradog Road, Aberystwyth. 
Lewis, John Davies, Esq., Greenway, Narberth, Pems. 
Lewis, Richard, Esq., Coed Saeson, Sketty, Swansea. 
Lewis, T. Y., Esq., Lloj'ds Bank Ltd., Haverfordwest. 
Lisbume, The Right Hon. The Earl of, Crosswood, Aberystwyth, Cards. 
Liverpool University Library (per Messrs. Henry Young & Sons, Ltd., 

12 South Castle Street, Liverpool). 
Lloyd, H. Meuric, Esq., Cynghordy, near Llandovery, Carms. 
Lloyd, Richard LI., Esq., Penty Park, Clarbeston Road, Pems. 
Lowless, R. D., Esq., Town Clerk's Office, Pembroke. 
Manchester Public Free Libraries (Reference Library), Manchester. 
Merthyr, The Right Hon. Lord, Hean Castle, Saundersfoot, Pems. 
Meyrick Library, Jesus College, Oxford. 

Morgan, Major F. Stanley, Herbert's Lodge, Bishopston, Swansea. 
Morgan, Lieut.-Col. W. LI., Brynbriallu, Swansea. 
Morgan-Richardson, E., Esq., Tref organ, Cardigan. 
National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. 
Newberry Library, Chicago, Ilhnois, U.S.A. (per Messrs. Maggs Bros., 

34 & 35 Conduit Street, New Bond Street, London, W.i.) 
New York Public Library (per Messrs. B. F. Stevens and Brown, 4 

Trafalgar Square, London, W.C.2.). 
Owen, D. C. Lloyd, Esq., Bryn-y-graig, Harlech, N. Wales. 
Owen, Col. W., Calder Lodge, Maidenhead, Berks. 
Pennsylvania, Historical Society of, Philadelphia, Penn., U.S.A. (per 

Messrs. B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Square, London, W.C.2.) 
Philipps, Sir Charles E. G., Bart., Picton Castle, Haverfordwest, Pems. 
Poole-Hughes, The Rev. W. W., The College, Llandovery, Carms. 
Prosser, The Ven. Archdeacon D. L., The Vicarage, Pembroke Dock, 

Pems. 
Public Record Office Library (per H.M. Stationery Office, Prince's 

Street, Westminster, London, S.W.i.). 
Pughe, J. Jones, Esq., Mathavarn, Whitchurch, Cardiff. 
Rees, J. F., Esq., The University, Edinburgh. 
Rees, Llewellyn, Esq., Ashdale, Narberth, Pems. 
Rees, Sidney, Esq., Spring Gardens, Haverfordwest. 
Rylands (The John) Library, Manchester. 
St. Davids, The Right Hon. Lord Viscount, 7 Park Crescent, Portland 

Place, London, W.i. 
St. Davids, The Right Rev. The Lord Bishop of. The Palace, Abergwili, 

Carms. 
St. David's College Library, Lampeter, Cards. 
St. Louis, Mo., Pubhc Library, (per Messrs. B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 

Trafalgar Square, London, W.C.2.) 
Salmon, Principal David, Brynhyfryd, Narberth, Pems. 
Salmon, Miss Mary, Training College, Swansea. 

Saunders, Mrs. Susanne M. Rudman, Glanrhydw, Kidwelly, Carms. 
Spurrell, Walter, Esq., King Street, Carmarthen. 
Stephens, Sir Alfred, Broomhill, Kidwelly. 
Stepney-Gulston, Miss A. J., M.B.E., Derwydd, Llandebie, Carms. 



Swansea Public Library, Swansea. 

Swansea University College, Swansea. 

Tenby, The Local Museum (per J. E. Arnett, Esq., 7 Norton, Tenby). 

Theakston, Mrs. Lucy E. Lloyd, White Lodge, Llanrhos, nr. Llan- 
dudno, North Wales. 

Thomas, Sir A. Garrod, Bron-y-gaer, Newport, Mon. 

Thomas, D. Lleufer, Esq., Derlwyn, Whitchurch, Cardiff. 

Thomas, Sir Hugh, Castle Hall, Milford Haven. 

Thomas, Sir J. Lynn, Greenlawn, Penylan, Cardiff. 

Vaughan, Herbert M., Esq., Llangoedmore, Cardigan. 

Warren, Frederick J., Esq., 3 Victoria Place, Haverfordwest. 

Webb-Bowen, Townsend I., Esq., Merton House, Merton-rd., Southsea. 

WiUiams, G. E. P., Esq., 7 Spring Gardens, Haverfordwest. 

Williams, Sir John, Bart., K.C.V.O., Blaen Llynant, Aberystwyth. 

WilHams, The Very Rev. W., The Deanery, St. Davids, Perns. 

Williams-Treffgarne, W. H., Esq., 11 Aberdare Gardens, South, Hamp- 
stead, London, N.W.6. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 



By DAVID SALMON. 



About 1647 George Fox, after three or four years of 
mental and spiritual conflict, evolved a system of doctrines 
that satisfied his mind and soul. Of the system as a 
whole I not do propose to speak, but I must speak of 
those doctrines that exposed believers to persecution or 
ridicule, because some knowledge of them is essential 
to a full understanding of Quaker history. 

(i) — He held that, while the ministry was open to 
both sexes, no one ought to become a minister without 
an inward call. Even with this call no one had ' a 
right to assume the exclusive exercise ' of the ministry 
in any ' congregation of Christians ' ; and the ' ministry 
being, if rightly received, received freely, . . . ought to 
be freely communicated, and no further support expected 
by ministers than what is authorised by Christ and 
practised by his apostles.'^ Hence Quakers had a double 
objection to supporting the ministers of the Established 
Church, and would suffer distraint (often extortionate), 
imprisonment, and excommunication rather than pay 
tithes or Easter offerings. 

(2) — They obeyed literally and absolutely the command 
* Swear not at all.' They not only refrained from the 
use of coarse, profane, or blasphemous language — they 
would not take the oaths required by law even for the 
protection of their own legal rights. Though the most 



1 Heny Tuke : The Quakers' Principles of Religion, 1805, p. 86. 
A 



2 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

unresisting of subjects, they would not swear allegiance 
to the king ; and though ready to perform the duties 
of any muncipal office they would not qualify by being 
* sworn in.' 

(3) — They were opposed to war and everything that it 
implies. They would not serve or provide a substitute 
when drawn for the army, and they would not contribute 
in any form towards its upkeep. 

(4) — They would not remove their hats as a mark of 
respect to man, considering the baring of the head to be 
' a token of reverence enjoined and used ' only in their 
' solemn approaches to the Supreme Being, when exercising 
the religious duties of preaching or prayer.' They did 
not consider social duties as beneath their attention or 
regard, but they held that ' true civility and due respect 
may be better shown by conduct than by compliment.'^ 

The people who held these peculiar beliefs were exposed 
to cruel and persistent persecution for nearly forty years. 
For a much longer period they were exposed by certain 
other peculiarities to the ridicule of the unthinking. 
Thus their clothes, while notably neat and good, were 
from the first very plain, and gradually became anti- 
quated. And they had sundry oddities of speech. When 
addressing a single person they did not use the customary 
plural pronouns ; nor would they use the customary 
complimentary titles, such as Mr., Mrs., Miss, or St. ; 
they called the days of the week and the months of the 
year by their numbers instead of by their customary 
heathen names ; the Established Church was the ' nation- 
al worship,' its buildings ' steeple-houses,' and its clergy 
' priests,' etc. 

One of the most remarkable things in the history of 
this remarkable people is the rapidity of their spread, not 
only through England and Wales, but to Scotland and 
Ireland, and even to the American colonies and the 
West Indies. In 1647 Fox was the only Quaker : in 

1 Id., p. 151. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 3 

1661 there were 4200 Quakers — not in the country, but 
in prison ! These were mostly men. Assuming as many 
men to be at large, we may reasonably estimate the 
men, women, and children together at 30,000 to 40,000 
(out of a population of five millions). Twenty years 
later there were probably 70,000 to 80,000. 

The rapidity of growth is all the more remarkable as 
the converts generally came, not from the careless, the 
wordly, or the ir-religious, but from a far smaller class — 
the deeply devout, who, having failed to find satisfaction 
in the older creeds, were willing to try a new one. For 
a whole century the nation had been distracted by 
religious and political conflicts — between Protestants and 
Catholics, between orthodox Churchmen and Puritans, or 
between Presbyterians and Independents — conflicts in 
which religion embittered the politics and politics in- 
fected the religion, so that gentle souls were yearning for 
peace, while pious souls ' burdened with the formality, 
superstition, and will-worship prevalent around them ' 
were ready to welcome a mode of ' waiting upon God in 
a holy silence and awful humility,' whereby they might 
' draw nigh unto Him in true spiritual worship.'^ 

One reason why the new faith spread so rapidly 
was that it had for missionaries men and women as 
zealous, as eager to dare and willing to die, as the first 
apostles of Christianity. George Fox himself (who set 
the example) was for more than forty years seldom 
stationary except when he was in prison ; like Paul he 
was ' in journeyings often,' in perils manifold, in weariness 
and painfulness, in watchings, in hunger, and in thirst. 
He compassed land and sea to gain proselytes. He 
travelled twice through Holland and Germany ; he 
undertook one voyage to the American Colonies, and 
another to the West Indies ; and the list of places which 
he visited (often several times) in the British Isles in- 
cludes about thirteen hundred names. 

1 Alexander Jaffray. 



4 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

The ardour of the missionaries was aided enor- 
moush^ by the blameless conduct of the converts, which 
shed around them 

In the common strife. 
Or mild concerns of ordinary life, 
A constant influence, a peculiar grace. 

Persons who rejected their creeds and smiled at their 
peculiarities were forced to admire their sincerity and 
their integrity. Refusing to take an oath they were so 
careful of their language that their simple assertion 
could be trusted as confidently as the sworn testimony 
of other men ; their words were bonds, their hearts 
' as far from fraud as heaven from earth. '^ 

Of all the forces that concurred in the spread of 
the new beliefs perhaps the most powerful was the 
persecution of the believers. With infinite labour George 
Besse, towards the middle of the eighteenth century, 
compiled ' A Collection of the Sufferings of the people 
called Quakers, for the testimony of a good conscience, 
from the time of their being first distinguished by that 
name in the 3^ear 1650, to the time of the Act, commonly 
called the Act of Toleration, granted to Protestant 
Dissenters in the first year of the reign of King William 
the Third and Queen Mary, in the year 1689.' (London, 
1753). The names of the sufferers with the particulars 
of their suft'erings (both necessaril}^ illustrative rather than 
exhaustive) fill over thirteen hundred folio pages ; Wales 
alone, notwithstanding its small area and population, 
had nearly five hundred heroes on its roll of honour. 

1 This was the secret of their success, when, after the storm of 
persecution had blown over, they settled down to business. The Lloyds, 
the Bevans, the Gurneys, and the Barclays prospered as bankers 
because everybody knew that they could be trusted with money ; 
the Hanburys, the Buxtons, the Barclays, and the Perkinses prospered 
as brewers, because everybody knew that they made honest beer ; 
the Howards, the Aliens, the Hanburys, and the Bells prospered as 
chemists, because everybody knew that they made or sold pure drugs. 
Many more illustrations might be given, for there were few depart- 
ments of trade, commerce, or industry in which Quakers were not 
leaders. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 5 

The meekness and constancy with which they bore 
undeserved punishment may perhaps be paralleled, but 
I believe that their generosity to each other is unparalleled. 
It was common for a Friend at large to offer himself as 
substitute for one in bonds, and in 1659 a hundred and 
sixty-four of them collectively addressed Parliament, 
offering ' their own bodies, person for person, to lie in 
prison instead of such of their brethren as were then 
under confinement, and might be in danger of their 
lives through extreme durance.' How could such deeds 
fail to call forth sympathy ? And sympathy with the 
sufferers easily led to a conviction that the faith for 
which they were willing to suffer must be true. It is 
more than a coincidence that when persecution ceased 
the numbers declined. 

Only one law, 13 and 14 Car. II., c.l. (1661), was aimed 
directly at the Quakers. The necessity of it was stated 
in the preamble : 

Whereas of late times certain persons under the names of Quakers, 
and other names of separation, have taken up and maintained sundry 
dangerous opinions and tenets, and (among others) that the taking 
of an oath in any case whatsoever, although before a lawful magistrate, 
is altogether unlawful and contrary to the Word of God : And the said 
persons do daily refuse to take an oath, though lawfully tendered, 
whereby it often happens that truth is wholly suppressed, and the 
administration of Justice much obstructed ; And whereas the said 
persons, under a pretense of religious worship, do often assemble 
themselves in great numbers in several parts of the realm, to the great 
endangering of the publick peace and safety, and to the terror of the 
people, by maintaining a secret and strict correspondence among 
themselves, and in the meantime separating and dividing themselves 
from the rest of His Majesty's good and loyal subjects, and from the 
publick congregations and usual places of divine worship. 

It was, therefore, enacted that anyone who (i) main- 
the unlawfulness of taking or ' wilfully and obstinately ' 
refused to take an oath ; or (2) assembled with others 
' to the number of five or more of the age of sixteen 
years or upwards at any one time in any place under 
pretence of joining in a religious worship not authorised 



6 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

by the laws of the realm,' should pay £5 or undergo 
three months' imprisonment for the first offence, £10 or 
six months for the second, and for the third should 
' abjure the realm or be transported.' 

But if there was only one Act directly aimed at the 
Quakers they could with a little malevolent ingenuity 
be brought within the range of several others. Thus, by 
an Act of Henry VIII. they could be imprisoned for refus- 
ing to pay tithes ; by Acts of Elizabeth they could be 
fined for absence from Church, and if obstinate, could be 
banished ; and a refusal to take the oath of allegiance 
exposed them to the penalties of praemunire, which 
might involve forfeiture of both property and liberty. 
They might also be excommunicated for heresy, and if 
they persisted (as they always did) Chancery would issue 
a writ de excommunicato capiendo, directing the sheriff 
to seize them and keep them confined till they had given 
satisfaction. Even for the ' contempt ' of refusing to 
remove their hats in a court of law they might be com- 
mitted indefinitely. When on the way to their distant 
meetings they could be arrested as vagrants, and black- 
guards could assault them without fear of resistance or 
reprisal. Besse gives local examples of cowardly attacks 
on the defenceless. 

Beside the grievous persecution inflicted on this people in Wales 
under colour of law, many of them were grievously beaten and abused, 
to the hazard of their lives, by wicked persons on the road, who, on 
presumption of impunity, made it their sport to insult and abuse their 
peaceable neighbours : Of those who suffered much by this means 
were John Humphreys and Humphry Williams at Carmarthen, James 
Lewis, near Tenby, Griffith Morgan, and many others ; and even 
some of the priests struck several of them with their own hands (Vol. 
I., p. 748). 

It is obvious that the fate of the Quakers depended 
very much on the temper of the magistrate. If he was 
humane and tolerant^ they had little to fear except the 

1 Even a well-disposed magistrate was sometimes compelled by 
mercenary informers to notice acts or omissions that he would other- 
wise have ignored. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 7 

taking of their property for tithes and other legal dues ; 
if he was malicious or bigoted he would procure proof 
that they had attended their own services, and had not 
attended the services of the Church, and that they had 
broken other laws. He might even punish his own 
enemies as enemies of the established religion. Thus 
Richard Davies, of Welshpool, ' having had some differ- 
ence with a neighbouring justice of the peace, that 
magistrate avenged himself and vented his own private 
spleen by tendering to the said Richard the oath of 
allegiance, and sending him to prison, where he continued 
for some years ' (Vol. I., p. 751). This same Richard 
records several instances of Quakers being sheltered from 
the malice of magistrates or priests by enlightened and 
benevolent magnates like Lord Powis, Lord Herbert of 
Cherbury, and William Lloyd, bishop of St. Asaph ; and 
he gives the Pembrokeshire justices a good character. 
' I was informed,' he says, * that they were generally very 
moderate in the hardest times of persecution.' I am 
afraid that he was misinformed. If he was not, there 
must have been a few whose persecuting zeal outweighed 
the moderation of the rest, for our county had more 
than its share of sufferers and sufferings. 

To close this chapter of martyrs I may add that the 
Act of Toleration (1689) gave all Protestant Dissenters 
liberty of worship and the option of making a declaration 
of fidelity instead of taking the oath of allegiance. Qua- 
kers were still liable to be harassed for refusing to swear 
and to pay Church dues. They were relieved from the 
first liability by an Act passed in 1696, allowing them to 
affirm. They could not be relieved from the liability to 
pay tithes, etc., but the same Act freed them from the 
heavy law costs incurred in their recovery. A single 
magistrate could henceforth sign a warrant for levying 
distress, and if there was an over-levy the ' over-plus 
was to be rendered to the ' offender.' 

It is impossible to say definitely who first brought the 
Friendly light to Pembrokeshire. Thomas Holme cer- 



8 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

tainly visited the county early in the history of the 
movement, and Besse says that he is believed ' to have 
been the first preacher among the people called Quakers 
in Wales.' Holme may have been the first of Fox's 
English disciples^ to cross Offa's Dyke on a mission, 
but he was not the first to bring the new faith. Richard 
Davies, of Welshpool, writes : 

About this time, being in the year 1656, our ministers told us that 
there was a sort of people come up in the north [of England] called 
Quakers, that were a people of strange postures and principles. . .. 
This sort of people called Quakers were much preached against. . . . 
They were represented to us to be such a dangerous sort of people 
that we were afraid of any who had the name of Quaker, lest we should 
be deceived by them.* 

The report concerning the * strange people ' had 
reached Wrexham by 1653, and roused so much curiosity 
that in July of that year Morgan Lloyd,^ ' the priest,' 
sent two of his congregation to Swarthmore to enquire. 
The result of their mission is told by Fox : 

When those triers came down amongst us the power of the Lord 
overcame them, and they were both convinced of the truth. So they 
stayed some time with us, and then returned into Wales, where, after- 
wards, one of them departed from his convincement ; but the other, 
whose name was John ap John [of Trevor, near Llangollen], abode in 
the truth, and received a part in the ministry, in which he continued 
faithful.* 

It is known that when John returned to Wales he 
began preaching the new faith ; it is highly probably 
that he was the Welshman who accompanied Holme, and 
certain that he was the Welshman who accompanied 



1 Two of them, John Lawson and Richard Hubberthorne, had paid 
a brief visit to Wrexham in October, 1653, but as their zeal was chiefly 
displayed in abusing a respected ' priest,' they are not likely to have 
made any converts. 

2 An account of the convincement, exercises, services, and travels 
of that ancient servant of the Lord, Richard Davies, 1710, p. 7. 

3 The Independent minister of Wrexham, author of Llyfy y tri 
aderyn. He was a celebrated mystical preacher, and had a good deal 
of sympathy with the views of Fox. He was probably the ' priest ' 
of the preceding note i . 

* Journal of George Fox, 1852, I., 172. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 9 

Fox to Pembrokeshire. Of the two visits we fortunately 
have accounts written by the visitors themselves. The 
first, preserved among the Swarthmore MSS. is described 
as a ' letter from Thomas Holme to Margaret Fell,^ 
abought 1656, conserning his wife.' It is dated ' 26 day 
4 month ' (June O.S.). The year is omitted, but all the 
known facts point to 1656. This^ is the part most interest- 
ing to us : 

The last week I was in Pembrokeshire. It's called ' Little England 
beyond Wales.' The most of that county is English. The Lord hath a 
people there. In Tenby, which stands upon the eye [?edge] of the 
sea, I had five meetings. Four of them I had at the mayor's house, 
and the other at his brother's. A great convincement there is there ; 
truly the Lord hath a great work here, away in the south of Wales and 
Monmouthshire. The mayor of Tenby and his wife are pretty Friends, 
and his brother and sister, and many others in the town hath a true 
love and true desires in them. A justice there is in the town which 
came to meetings the last First Day, and his brother and many of them 
called gentle folks have a true love in them. My spirit was large to- 
wards them ; they receive the truth in the love of it. I lay four nights 
in the mayor's house, and a Welshman [almost certainly John ap John] 
with me I took along, which is serviceable. 

We passed to Pembroke town. In that town there is one of the 
aldermen convinced, and a shoemaker are two. 

And from thence we passed to Haverfordwest, the greatest town in 
Wales, and there, a merchant of the town [almost certainly William 
Bateman] is convinced. And we got a meeting that night of near 
two hundred people at his house in that town. 

This is Fox's account^ of the visit which he paid to 
Pembrokeshire in 1657. 



1 Margaret Fell was then the wife of Thomas Fell of Swarthmore 
Hall, near Ulverston, in Furness, a member of the Long Parliament, 
judge of assize on the Chester and North Wales circuit, vice-chancellor 
of the Duchy of Lancaster, and attorney for the County Palatine. 
She was converted by Fox in 1652 ; her husband, though he did not 
become a professed follower, became a warm sympathiser. He died 
in 1658 ; in 1669 his widow married Fox. From the date of her con- 
version her home had been a kind of headquarters, whither the mission- 
aries sent reports of their movements. These, with many other docu- 
ments, were carefully preserved, and now form invaluable material 
for the history of the Friends. 

2 The spelling and punctuation have been modernised. 

3 Journal, I., 299. 



10 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

From this place [Leominster] I travelled on in Wales, having several 
meetings, till I came to Tenby ; where, as I rode up the street, a 
justice of peace came out of his house, desired me to alight and stay 
at his house ; and I did so. On First Day the mayor and his wife and 
several of the chief of the town came in about ten and stayed all the 
time of the meeting. A glorious one it was. John ap John, being then 
with me, left it and went to the steeple-house, and the governor^ cast 
him into prison. On the Second Day morning the governor sent one 
of his ofi&cers to the justice's house to fetch me, which grieved the 
mayor and the justice, for they were both with me in the justice's 
house when the officer came. So the mayor and the justice went up 
to the governor before me ; and after a while I went up with the officer. 
WTien I came in I said ' Peace be unto this house.' And before the 
governor could examine me I asked him why he cast my friend into 
prison. He said ' For standing with his hat on in the church.' I said, 
' Had not the priest* two caps on his head, a black one and a white 
one ? Cut oj5 the brims of the hat, and then my friend would have but 
one, and the brims of the hat were but to defend him from the weather. ' 
' These are frivolous things,' said the governor. ' Why then,' said I, 
' dost thou cast my friend into prison for such frivolous things ? ' 
Then he asked me whether I owned election and reprobation. ' Yes,' 
said I, ' and thou art in the reprobation.' At that he was in a rage, and 
said he would send me to prison till I proved it ; but I told him I would 
prove that quickly if he would confess truth. Then I asked him whether 
wrath, fury, rage, and persecution were not marks of reprobation ; 
for he that was born of the flesh persecuted him that was born of the 
Spirit ; but Christ and His disciples never persecuted nor imprisoned 
any. Then he fairly confessed that he had too much wrath, haste, 
and passion in him. I told him Esau was up in him, the first birth, 
not Jacob the second birth. The Lord's power so reached and came 
over him that he confessed to truth ; and the other justice came and 
shook me kindly by the hand. 

As I was passing away I was moved to speak to the governor again, 
and he invited me to dine with him, and set my friend at liberty. I 
went back to the other justice's house ; and after some time the mayor 
and his wife, and the justice and his wife, and divers other Friends of 
the town went about half a mile out of town with us, to the water side 



1 Tenby was a walled town, and in the Pembrokeshire rising had 
sided with the king. It was taken by the Parliamentary forces on 31st 
May, 1648, and the governor would doubtless be one of Cromwell's 
officers as expert in theology as in war, and as much prejudiced against 
the new system as one of Laud's own priests would have been. 

2 John Roch was appointed rector in 1624, and died in 1670, but 
during the Commonwealth the living was held by Edward Carner, 
who therefore may have been the priest. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. il 

when we went away ; and there, when we parted from them, I was 
moved of the Lord to kneel down with them and pray to the Lord to 
preserve them. So, after I had recommended them to the Lord Jesus 
Christ, their Saviour and free teacher, we passed away in the Lord's 
power, and the Lord had the glory. A meeting continues in that town 
to this day. 

We travelled to Pembrokeshire and in Pembroke had some service 
for the Lord. 

Thence we passed to Haverfordwest, where we had a great meeting, 
and all was quiet. The Lord's power came over all, and many were 
settled in the new covenant, Christ Jesus, and built upon Him their 
rock and foundation ; and they stand a precious meeting to this day. 
Next day, being their fair day, we passed through it, and sounded the 
day of the Lord and His everlasting truth amongst them. 

These two extracts, instead of answering our question 
as to the ' first publisher of the truth ' in Pembrokeshire, 
suggest other questions. The municipal authorities of 
Tenby might, if broadminded, have tolerated or ignored 
the presence of Holme and Fox, and, if narrowminded, 
have persecuted them ; but we find Holme welcomed in 
1656 as a guest by the mayor, and heard sympathetically 
by one of the justices,^ and Fox in 1657 welcomed as a 
guest and heard sympathetically by the mayor. The 
mayor was elected on Michaelmas Day, when two of the 
aldermen were also chosen to act as justices during the 
coming year. The mayor elected in 1655 was Thomas 
Rogers, but he died in office,^ and was succeeded for the 
remainder of his term by Thomas Barrett.^ It must 

1 Remembering the recent serious anti-Puritan rising in Pembroke- 
shire we may well understand that Cromwell's government had been 
careful to appoint as magistrates only men of strong Puritan convic- 
tions — men therefore likely to tolerate, perhaps to sympathise vnth 
the new doctrine. 

2 An entry in the Gumfreston Parish Registers shows that Rogers 
performed a marriage ceremony on January 3rd, 1655-6. — Article by 
Edward Laws in the Archcsologia Cambrensis, July, 1900, p. 214. 

3 The Barretts were a family of standing in Tenby. A Thomas 
Barrett (possibly the father of our Thomas) was alderman in 1623, and 
gave ;^io to be lent without interest to poor burgesses ; a Thomas 
(possibly ours) was mayor in 1651, and an Alderman Thomas (almost 
certainly the same) is shown by an extant probate inventory to have 
died in 1665. — Laws : Little England beyond Wales, p. 397, and informa- 
tion supplied by the Town Clerk (Mr. G. Lort Stokes) and Mr. Francis 
Green. 



12 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

be he who received Holme, and it may be he who was on 
the look-out to welcome Fox. Holme, writing imme- 
diately after his visit, says that the mayor and his wife 
' are pretty Friends,' and ' the Lord hath a people there.' 
This is not the language we should expect him to apply 
to converts made within the past week, and all the 
circumstances seem to suggest that there were Friends 
in Tenby before June, 1656, and that it was a knowledge 
of the welcome awaiting them which caused Holme and 
Fox to begin their mission there rather than at Haverford- 
west, ' the greatest town in Wales.' We know from 
Gawler that Holme's wife addressed the Quakers assem- 
bled in Barrett's house in 1659,^ ^^^ the only difficulty 
is that he must have taken an oath on assuming office. 
Could he have been converted between the assumption 
and the arrival of Holme ? 

Leaving these questions, perforce, unanswered, I come 
now to a visit made about 1665 by the Richard Davies 
of Welshpool, already mentioned. This is his account^ 
of it : 

' When I was clear of Bristol, the Lord having blessed me and pre- 
served me so far in my journey, I set forward towards Pembrokeshire. 
I travelled without any companion, but the Lord alone, who was 
with me all along in my journey ; He was my helper and preserver. 

So I came to the house of our Friend Lewis Davies [David, of Llan- 
ddewi Velfrey], who gladly received me in the Lord. Staying there 
some time they lent me a horse to go to a meeting at Redstone [about 
a mile north of Narberth Castle], and I left my own horse behind me, 
thinking he might rest for some days after my hard riding. When I 
came to the place the meeting was out of doors, there being no house 
that I knew of that could contain the multitude of people. When we 
came to the meeting Meredith Edwards, whom Friends judged unfit 
to preach the Gospel, had the confidence to speak to the people till 
they were weary of him, and those that were sensible were burthened 
by him ; after some time there stood up a Friend and silenced him. 
I sate as a stranger among them. The Lord was with us ; His good 
presence was our comfort and satisfaction ; and after some time I had 
an opportunity to open to the people those things that belong to their 

1 Francis Gawler : A Record of some Persecutions, 1659, p. 21. 
* Davies : op. cii. p. 115. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 13 

eternal salvation ; and having concluded the meeting in prayer this 
man, M. Edwards aforesaid, stood up again and preached to the people, 
and I turned my back and came away and the Friends, with most 
part of the people, followed me. 

As I was coming out a Friend came and told me there were two 
soldiers (I understood afterwards they were the two sons of a priest) 
that had brought my horse there some [2J] miles. When I saw my 
horse I drew nigh to them and asked them who brought my horse 
there. They asked me whether I was the man that came from Bristol. 
I said I was. ' Then,' said they, ' you are the man we look for.' I 
asked them by what authority they came or what warrant they had, 
and they showed me their swords and pistols. I told them such war- 
rants highwaymen had. Then I asked them how they durst venture 
so among such a company. They said they knew we were peaceable 
men, and would not resist ; otherwise they would have brought greater 
force. I told Friends ' We are not bound to obey them,' and desired 
Friends to part, and leave only two or three with me ; but Friends' 
love was so great to me that they kept mostly in a body about me. 
So I desired the Friend to take my saddle and bridle, that was 
upon the Friend's horse that I rid to the meeting on, and put them 
upon my own horse. So I got upon my horse and bid them lay their 
hands off my horse, for I feared not their swords nor pistols ; but if 
they had a warrant from any justice of peace or lawiul magistrate 
within the county I would obey it. Then they let my horse go, and I 
turned a little aside, and saw them lay hold of the other man, M. 
Edwards (I could not call him a Friend, because he was not guided 
by a right spirit), and I turned myself to them again, and told them 
that if any justice of peace or any lawful magistrate within the county 
had anything to say to me that came from Bristol, they should hear of 
me at the house of William Bateman, in Haverfordwest. I told them 
my business would require some stay in the country ; so they let us 
go pretty friendly ; and I had several brave meetings in Haverfor- 
west and other places in the county. 

The last I had was at Ponchison [Puncheston] among the Welsh. 
They having notice of a Welshman coming to keep a meeting in those 
parts, many came to that meeting, and good service I had for the 
Lord, His truth being declared in their own language to them. We had 
the meeting out of doors, and I stood with my back towards Thomas 
Simmon's [Simon's] wall of his house. I was young and strong and my 
voice was heard to the steeplehouse, and most of them came out to 
hear me, and very few came out with the priest when he had done. 
When the priest saw such a multitude he was moved to passion, and 
would have had the constable take me down. It was reported some 
said to the priest they would not take me down for I preached Christ 
and the Gospel to them, and they would have him come and learn of 
me himself. I was informed that the priest's wife and two of his 



14 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

daughters were at the meeting, and were very loving and tender, and 
came to be convinced of the truth. The Lord was not wanting to us ; 
His life, power, and good presence was with us, and that meeting was 
the last I had in Pembrokeshire at that time. The Friends of that 
count}- were very loving and careful of Friends that came from far 
to visit them. . . . 

As for M. Edwards, the two men before mentioned took him 
before a justice ; the justice would have been moderate to him, and 
would have showed him kindness, but he, by his ungoverned temper, 
provoked the justice to passion, so that he committed him to the House 
of Correction as a vagrant for three months to the great trouble of 
Friends. 

Richard Davies came to Pembrokeshire a second time 
about 1668. He says^ that hearing Thomas Ellis and 
others had been arrested at Aberystwyth and sent to 
Cardigan Gaol, 

I found much love in my heart towards them, even so as to go to 
the magistrates of the county, to offer myself a prisoner instead. . . 
that they might go home to visit their families. I acquainted my wife 
of my exercise, which came pretty close to her ; but she likewise in 
love, after a little consideration, gave me up for that service. So 
in a few days I took my journey, and went first to Thomas Ellis's 
house to visit his wife and family before I went farther ; his house 
being about twenty-four miles from Welshpool, and not far out of my 
way towards Cardiganshire. There I very unexpectedly met T. Ellis 
himself at home ; he told me they were all discharged out of prison. . . 
And now my service being farther for Pembrokeshire, T. Ellis was 
willing to accompany me in my journey ; and we went to Aberystwyth. 

Of what befel them there and at Lampeter, and of 
their hardship on the way to Cardigan, there is no need 
to speak. From Cardigan, Davies says, 

We had a Friend for our guide towards Pontchison in Pembroke- 
shire, but we were benighted, and it rained ; our guide lost his way, and 
we wandered up and down among the peat or turf pits and other danger- 
ous places, but the Lord preserved us out of them all. At length we 
came to Pontchison, but it being dark we did not know the house 
where our Friend, that we intended to go to, lived ; but I spoke to 
our guide to see where the steeple-house door was, and he brought 
us to it ; then I told them the Friend's house was opposite to it ; for 
I remembered when I had a meeting there my back was against the wall 

1 Davies, op. cit. p. 124. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 15 

of the house, and my face towards the steeple-house door. So we went 
forwards, and found the house. I desired T. ElUs to call and tell them 
that there were some Friends that had lost their way, and desired to 
have lodging there that night. They, being in bed, answered they 
thought that no good Friends were out at that time of the night. T. 
ElUs reasoned a little with them, but still they were not willing to 
rise and let us in. At last I called to the Friend, whose name was 
Thomas Simmons, and to his wife, and desired them to rise and let 
us come in. He asked me who was there. I told him in Welsh, Richard 
Davies was there. ' What,' said he, ' Richard Davies of Welshpool ? ' 
I told him I was the man. Thereupon the tender loving Friends 
hastily came down and let us into their house, and we were satisfied 
in the love of God. . . . 

Hence we went to Haverfordwest, and so through all the meetings 
in that county till we came to Pontchison again, and had a meeting 
there, where there came many Friends, both Welsh and English, so 
that the house could not contain us, and we had the meeting out of 
doors in the street, and I declared the word of the Lord to them both 
in Welsh and English. 

On their way home Davies and Ellis had a meeting at 
Newcastle Emlyn, whither they were accompanied by 
James Lewis (of Llanddewi), Peregrine Musgrave/ and 
other Friends. 

John Burnyeat, another of the ' first publishers of 
truth,' visited Pembrokeshire, alone or with John ap 
John, in 1667, 1668, 1669, 1675, and 1676, but as his 
Journal is very summary, we know nothing more of 
his visits than that he had many ' blessed ' or ' precious ' 
meetings. The same adjectives are used by Hugh Ro- 
berts, of Pennsylvania, to describe the meetings that he 
had at Haverfordwest and Redstone during a visit paid 
to the mother-land in 1697. 

1 Ernestus Musgrave, an Englishman, who settled in Cardiganshire 
during the Civil War, was employed by the Cromwellian Commissioners 
for the Propagation of the Gospel. His son. Peregrine, born on January 
4th, 1644, started business as a mercer in the Parish of St. Martin, 
Haverfordwest, where he joined the Quakers. He married on Sept. 
29th, 1674, Alice, the daughter of Lewis David, Llanddewi Velfrey. 
He died at Haverfordwest on May 14th, 1712, and was buried at East 
Hook. His sister, Elinor, married George Painter of Broomhill, Dale, 
from whom Lewis Weston Dillwyn, the founder of the famous Cambrian 
Pottery Works at Swansea, was descended. — Article by Mr. Francis 
Green on ' The Musgraves of Llanina ' in West Wales Hist. Records, 
Vol. IV., p. 193. 



i6 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

The persecution of the Quakers began during the 
Commonwealth, for the Puritans who demanded freedom 
of worship for themselves under Charles denied it to 
others under Cromwell. Cromwell himself was not un- 
friendly. In 1654, when Fox, arrested in the country, 
was sent up to him, the two men had a long and serious 
talk, at the end of which the man of war dismissed the 
man of peace with the words, ' Come again to my house, 
for if thou and I were but an hour a day together we should 
be nearer one to the other.' 

There was no persecution in Pembrokeshire till after 
the death of the Protector. There was much during the 
next thirty years, but exactly how much it is impossible 
to tell, for Besse too often gives the sufferer a name 
without a local habitation. The context sometimes 
warrants more or less confident guesses. If my guesses 
are right (and they may exclude wrongly as many as 
they include wrongly) the number who suffered in the 
county was about iio,^ and the number of the sufferings 
was — 

Imprisonment for attending meetings, about . . 48 

Imprisonment for absence from church . . . , 8 

Imprisonment for refusing to take the oath of allegi- 

iance . . , . . . . . . , . . 8 

Imprisonment for refusing to remove the hat . . 3 

Imprisonment for standing in church . . . . 2 

Imprisonment after excommunication . . . . 3 

Excommunicated for 2d. . . . . . . . . i 

Died in prison . . , . . . . . . . . . i 

Excessive distraint for fines (for absence from 

church, etc.) . . . . . . . . . . • • 15 

Excessive distraint for tithes . . . . . . . . 90 

Excessive distraint for church dues (repairs, etc.) . . 3 

Excessive distraint for arms and munitions . . 8 

Beaten without law . . . . . . . . . . 3 

1 For their names see Appendix I. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 17 

A complete list of the sufferers with particulars of their 
sufferings would be monotonous, but the following ex- 
amples quoted from Besse should be interesting : — 

Anno 1659. James Jones was committed to the 
House of Correction by the Mayor^ of Haverfordwest, 
for standing before the Minister in the Steeple-house 
there, to the Amazement both of him and the People, 
as the Warrant of Commitment expressed it. For 
the like case William Thomas, of Llandey [Llanddewi 
Velfrey] in Pembrokeshire, was also imprisoned. . . . 

In this year Elizabeth Holmes [Holme] ^ preached 
at many large meetings in Pembrookshire ; at one 
of which Meetings Adam Hawkins,' Priest of Haver- 
fordwest, was present, and made at first some 
Opposition, but at length, being overcome by the 
Power of Truth, confessed that he did believe her 
to be a Woman that converted many Souls to God, 
and told her, if she would come to his Parish, he 
would give her Opportunity of speaking to the 
People. A short Time after, she, accompanied with 
Alice Burkett [Birkett], went thither, where they had 
a large Meeting at the House of William Bateman,* 
but were taken thence by Officers, and brought 
before the Mayor and another Justice, who sent 
them to the House of Correction, where the Keeper 

1 The mayor was Lewis Barron. The ' other justice ' was Thomas 
Davies (or Davids), who was sheriff in 1639, and mayor in 1652. 

2 Elizabeth Holme (Leavens) was the wife of Thomas. She and 
Alice Birkett of Kendal were two of the early missionaries. 

3 Adam Hawkins was vicar of St. Mary's from 1656 to 1679. Gawler 
says that Hawkins first heard Mrs. Holme ' in a meeting at Thomas 
Barrett's house in Tenbigh,' where he ' came with two Bibles under 
his arm.' 

* Bateman was one of the chief Quakers of Pembrokeshire, and 
belonged to one of the chief families of Haverfordwest. Between 
1605 and 1750 the office of mayor of the town was filled thirteen times, 
and the office of sheriff of the town and county thirteen times by a 
Bateman. No other name appears so often in the lists of mayors and 
sheriffs. Gawler says that some of the magistrates, ' formerly 
adherent to Charles Stuart,' had ' an enmity against ' William 
Bateman because he had been ' all along well-affected to the honest 
party' (the Puritans). 

B 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

at first talked roughly to them, but afterward, ob- 
serving their Christian and innocent Deportment, 
became very loving and kind, permitting them to 
have Meetings in the Prison, where they were kept 
about fourteen days till the Quarter Sessions. In 
their Imprisonment, Hawkins the Priest, came to 
them, pretending he had no Hand in their Commit- 
ment, for which Deceit they reproved him, knowing 
that he had influenced the Magistrates on that 
Occasion. At Sessions they were called, and one of 
the Justices who committed them [Davies], being 
informed how the Priest had attempted to wipe off 
from himself the Imputation of their Imprisonment, 
openly said that the Priest would not let the Justices 
be quiet, till they sent them to Prison, So the 
Justices gave the Priest a public Reprimand for 
his Hypocrisy, and set the Women at lyiberty. 
But a few Days after, the Mayor, whom Alice Burket 
had displeased by some Words she spake to him in 
the Street, sent her again to Bridewell, and after 
she had been there two Days, sent her out of the 
Town by a Pass, but she had not gone far before 
the Officers left her to go whither she would. — Vol. 
I., p. 741. 

Anno 1661. — In Pembrookshire, on the 6th of the 
month called August, Lewis David and Susan his 
Wife, James Lewis, Alice Lewis, Evan John, and 
William Thomas [all] of Llandewy [Llanddewi Velf rey] 
were committed to Prison till the next Assizes, 
where they were required to give Security that they 
would not go to any more Meetings, which refusing 
to do, they were recommitted. Soon after, ten 
others were sent to the same Prison, viz., Thomas 
Simons^ [of Puncheston], and Jane his Wife, with 



1 Ursula was the daughter of Thomas. Of the David and Francis 
Simons mentioned elsewhere as suffering for their faith, the first was 
certainly the son of Thomas, and there seems no reason for doubting 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 19 

their three Sons, Hugh, John, and Evan ; Ursula 
Simons, Laurence Edward [? Puncheston], Henry 
Edward, David Edward, and Margaret Edward. 
The Usage they met with was very cruel, being 
imprisoned among Felons and Murderers, who took 
away their Food, pickt their Pockets, and many 
Ways abused them : The Hardships they endured in 
Winter for want of Fire, having no Place to make 
any in, was very pinching to several of them, who 
were both aged and sickly, and had their Hands and 
Feet much swelled, and their Bodies looking black : 
This they endured two Winters, and after about 
eighteen Months Imprisonment were brought to 
Trial at the Assizes, where the Evidence against 
them was found insufficient to convict them of 
being at the Meeting for which they were indicted ; 
wherefore the Jury acquitted them, and they were 
speedily after discharged from their long unjust 
Confinement. 

On the 2ist of September, William Bateman and 
Sarah his Wife, James Jones, Henry Relief and 
Elizabeth his Wife, Morgan Eyron [? Eynon], and 
Joane his Wife, all of Haverford-West, were taken at a 
Meeting, and refusing to give Bail that they woiild 
have no more such Meetings, were committed to 
Prison, and kept their [sic] till the Assizes a Year 
after, where the Men were fined 5/. a piece, and the 
Women five marks each, for Non-payment of which 
they were sent to Bridewell, except William Bate- 
man, whose Fine they levied by Distress of hi-s 
Goods. — Vol. I., p. 747. 

.... Edmund Williams, David Simonds, John 

that the second was also. Thomas married Catherine, the daughter 
of WiUiam Probert of Trevigan in the parish of Llanrhian, so that he 
must have been twice married if Besse's ' Jane ' is correct. He died 
in 1673, and was buried at Puncheston. His son Hugh married Anne 
Thomas of Llanddewi Velfrey, and another son Evan, who married 
Jane, the daughter of David John, died in 1682, and was also buried 
at Puncheston. — Information supplied by Mr. Francis Green. 



20 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

Howel, and Richard Poole were taken at a meeting 
in the House of William Bateman in Haverford- 
West, and committed to the Town-Gaol, and two 
Days after, being brought before the Magistrates, 
the}" sent the former three to the House of Correction 
and ordered Richard Poole to remain in Prison till 
the Wind served to send him to Ireland, where he 
dwelt, and then to be whipped and sent thither. , . . 
—Vol. I., p. 748. 

Anno 1662. — On the 8th of September, James 
Picton^ was committed to Carmarthen Castle, under 
Sentence of Premunire for refusing to Swear, and 
from thence, after four Months, removed to the 
Gaol at Haverford-West, where he remained Prisoner 
many Years. — Vol. I., p. 748. 

Owen Ellis . . . was also excommunicated for 
refusing to pay 2d. for a Demand of Tithe for Cheese. 
— Vol. I., p. 749. 

Anno 1672. — In this Year, by King Charles the 

Second his Letters Patent, were discharged 

out of Carmarthen Castle, James Picton, who had 
lain in close Confinement there ten Years under 
Sentence of Premunire. — Vol. I., p. 755. 

Anno 1662. — In the Month called August, Nell 
Woolford,^ Mary Edoe, Elizabeth Luntly, Nell 
Griffith, and Catherine Lockier, all of Haverford- 
West, were brought before the Judge of Assize, who 
committed them to close Prison for refusing to 
take the Oath of Allegiance. 

In September, Humphry Williams and Rebecca 
his Wife, Abigail, the Wife of William Gray, John 
Howel, and Rebecca Williams, jun., as they were 



1 James Picton belonged to Swansea, a Quaker stronghold down 
to the igth century. He wrote A just plea against Swearing and against 
the National Worship of England (London, 1663). 

2 A Wolford was mayor three times, and sheriff four times between 
1655 and 1695 ; an Eddowe was sheriff in 1661. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 2i 

going to a Meeting in Haverford-West, were taken 
in the Street, and imprisoned some Days. — Vol. I., 
p. 749. 

Anno 1663.— William Fortune, John Davis, and 
Humphry Williams, were imprisoned some Days in 
the Month called April, for appearing at the Assizes 
in Pembrookshire with their hats on. — Vol. I., p. 

750- 

Anno 1666.— In this Year Hugh Lloyd, of Haver- 
ford-West, died a Prisoner for his Testimony against 
Swearing : For which cause also, Edward Lord^ was 
a Prisoner at Haverford-West. And in the same 
Year Hugh Simonds and Laurence Edwards were 
committed to Prison for Absence from the National 
Worship. — Vol. I., p. 751. 

Anno 1670. — In this Year also, many of this 
People suffered very grievous and exorbitant Dis- 
tresses for their religious Meetings, of which we have 
the following Instances, viz. : — 

I. Thomas Simonds, of Pincheston in Pembrook- 
shire, for suffering Meetings at his House, had his 
Cattle taken away at one Time worth 24I., which 
were sold for 8/. At another Time, some Household 
Goods of his worth 26s. were sold for 7s. And at 
another Time, Corn, Hay, and Thatch, taken from 
him to the value of 20/., were sold for 5/., of which 
one Third was ordered at Sessions to be given to 
the Poor, but they, conscious of the Sufferer's 
Innocence, from whose Charity they had often found 
Relief, refused to receive any of that Money when 
tendered them. 

II. William Thomas, of Llandewy, being fined 
5s., was met on the Highway by the chief Constable, 
a petty Constable, and an Informer, who demanded 
the Horse he rode upon ; he asking for their Warrant, 

1 Of Rudbaxton. In 1675 he was fined £5 for refusing to be sworn 
in as bailiff, and twice suffered excessive distraint for tithes. 



22 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

was answered with, Sirrah, do you question the 
King's Power ? And at the same Time was struck 
on the Head and Shoulders with a great Staff, and 
pluckt from his Horse, the Constables looking on, 
but not daring to gainsay the Act of their Master, the 
Informer. The Horse was taken away for a 5s. 
Fine, and afterwards sold for 3/. is. ^d. Beside 
which, they took from him a Pan worth i/. is. 

III. Lewis David, for 20I. Fine, had his Corn and 
Hay seized to the Value of 25/. and sold for 8^., being 
all the Effects he had in the County of Pembrook, 
but he having an House and Land in Carmarthen- 
shire, the Justices sent a Certificate thither, by 
which his Cattle, Corn, Hay, and Bedding there, 
were seized to the Value of 36/. more, which the^^ 
also sold for 8/., so that having taken the Value of 
61I. for a Fine of 20I. they yet pretended to want 
4I. of their first demand. — Vol. I., p. 752. 

Towards the end of the reign of Charles II., the sufferers 
heard that there was, across the sea, a pleasant land where 
they could enjoy freedom of worship, where the atmos- 
phere was Friendly, and where fertile farms could be 
had almost for the asking. This pleasant land was 
Pennsylvania,^ owned and ruled by the Quaker of highest 
social standing, William Penn. 

Penn's father, the great admiral Sir William, had died 
leaving him a claim against the Government of nearly 
£15,000 — money lent and salary unpaid. The son, 
anxious to find a place where the prisoners could be at 
rest and hear no more the voice of the oppressor, asked 

1 Penn had intended calling his province New Wales, because it 
was mountainous and also, perhaps, because that name would continue 
the chain of New England, New Amsterdam (New York), and New 
Jersey. The secretary of the Privy Council, however, being an Epis- 
copalian Welshman, objected to even a verbal connection between 
his native land and a Quaker settlement. Penn, therefore, remember- 
ing that the country was wooded as well as mountainous, suggested 
Sylvania. To this the King proposed to prefix Penn in honour of the 
admiral. The admiral's son demurred, but he was over-ruled, and 
Pensylvania was finally fixed on. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 23 

the King to give him, as payment, a tract of unoccupied 
land in America. Charles, whose treasury was often 
empty, thought a grant of uncounted miles which brought 
him nothing (and which in strict justice did not belong 
to him) would be an easy release from a troublesome 
debt, so Penn obtained (on 5th March, 1681) the charter 
which he sought. 

Without settlers the province would have been as value- 
less to him as it had been to the King, and settlers were 
accordingly invited. Of the Nonconformists who natur- 
ally accepted the invitation none accepted more readily 
and freely than the Quakers, and of the Quakers none 
more readily and freely than the Welsh. Their persecution 
having been specially severe, their desire for liberty and 
peace was specially keen. It was also their desire to pre- 
serve their nationality : they were willing to live near the 
English settlers, but did not want to live amongst them. 

They sent a committee of a dozen of their leading men 
(of whom Lewis David of Llanddewi Velfrey was one) to 
represent their views to Penn. When they met him in 
London they found him quite compliant. He promised 
to give them exclusive title to a barony where they ;ould 
keep up their old language and their old customs, and 
they promised to try to dispose of 40,000 or more acres. 
Seven ' companies ' of them bought 30,000 acres almost 
at once, the remainder being afterwards sold in smaller 
lots to individuals. The only ' company ' which con- 
cerns us immediately was headed by Lewis David, who 
paid £60 for a lot of 3000 acres (conveyed to him by deed 
dated March 2nd, 1681^). He in turn (by deeds dated 
May, 1682) conveyed 

500 acres to William Howell of Castlebythe, 

1000 acres to Henry Lewis of Redstone, 

500 acres to Rees Rotheroe of Llanwenog, Cardigan- 
shire, 

1 The facts respecting the dealings in land are summarised from C. 
H. Browning's Welsh Settlement of Pensylvania. (Browning gives a 
reason for this spelling of the name.) 



24 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

250 acres to Evan Thomas of Llanycefn, and 
250 acres to Maurice Scourfield of Narberth/ 

retaining the remaining 500 acres for himself. He did 
not emigrate till about 1690, and when he did he left some 
of his children behind. After holding a prominent posi- 
tion in the settlement he died in March, 1708, and was 
buried at Merion. 

The settlers had frequent dealings in land among 
themselves ; by 1702 there had been so many changes 
in the holdings and the holders that a new surve}^ became 
necessary. This showed that parts of the original grant 
to Lewis David were then occupied by — 

1. David Hugh (of whom I know nothing more). 

2. Henry, John David, and Nathan Thomas, who 

who may have been related to William Thomas 
of lylanddewi. 

3. John Lewis, sen., and John Lewis, jun., who prob- 

ably belonged to the Llanddewi family. 

4. Richard Hayes, who is said to have come from 

Ilmiston (? Uzmaston). 

5. Maurice Llewellyn of Castlebythe, and 

6. David Rees (probably the David Rice of ' near 

Redstone,' in Glenn's list). 

Henry Lewis of Redstone, by deed dated May loth, 
1682, bought for £25 1000 acres on which he settled soon 
afterwards. In 1684 he sold 250 acres to John Lewis, 
and in 1695, Henry Lewis, jun., sold 100 acres to John 
Lewis, jun., and 50 acres to Richard Hayes. Hayes had 
already bought 50 acres from William Howell, and 160 
from John Burge, clothier, of Haverfordwest, who also 
sold 250 acres to William Kelly, weaver, of the same town. 

Henry Lewis, sen., called his new home by the Welsh 

1 Maurice Scourfield, dying in 1682, did not emigrate. John, son to 
him and Dorothy, daughter of Henry Bowen of Haverfordwest, con- 
veyed these 250 acres, by deed dated April 22nd, 1699, to Owen Tho- 
mas. (This is an inference made with the aid of information from Mr. 
Francis Green, from the contradictory statements of Mr. Browning 
and Mr. Glenn.) 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 25 

name of his old home, Maencoch.^ He held, at one time 
or other, nearly every possible office, civil or religious, 
in the community. His will, made in 1688, and witnessed 
by Lewis David, Griffith Owen, and Thomas Ellis, was 
proved in 1705. He left Maencoch to his wife (Margaret 
Protheroe, whom he had married in 1670), and after 
her to his sons Henry and Lewis. He also provided for 
his son Samuel, and for his daughter Elizabeth (who had 
married Richard Hayes, jun., in 1697). 

Richard Hayes, sen., said to be of Ilmiston (? Uzmas- 
ton), and his wife Issett, are described as ' aged Friends ' 
when they left Pembrokeshire in 1687. He died in 1697 
leaving his estate to his wife, and after her to his son 
Richard (who had married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry 
Lewis of Redstone). He also gave legacies to his son 
John, and to his cousin Sarah James. Richard Hayes 
jun., ' having received a better education than was 
usual among the early emigrants, and being withal a 
man of excellent business qualifications, was almost 
constantly occupied in some public employment.' His 
daughter Hannah married in 1727, James Jones, who 
was born in Wales in 1699. 

William Jenkins, ' emasculator,' of Tenby, was born 
in 1648. He married in 1678 Elizabeth, daughter 
of Lewis Griffith of Tenby. In 1681 he bought 1000 
acres which he seems to have sold again, because, when 
he emigrated in 1685, he settled on 250 acres which he 
had bought from John Poyer of Redstone. In 1698 he 
removed to Abington, where Jenkinstown preserves his 
name to this day. After serving as justice and Member 
of Assembly he died on June 7th, 1712. 

The ' Welsh Tract ' is now almost a part of Philadelphia, 
but the love of the original settlers for their hen wlad 
is brought to mind by such place-names as Merion, 

1 Mr. Glenn, innocent of Welsh, says that Maencoch was ' probably 
a corruption of Maenclochog, a parish in Pembrokeshire, nine miles 
from Narberth.' — Merion, 290. 



26 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

Radnor, Montgomery, Bryn Mawr, Gwynedd, Uwchlan, 
Tred5'£fr3-n, Haverford, St. Davids, and Narberth ; and 
it is interesting for us to note that the farm-house built 
by Maurice Llewellyn and called Castle Bythe in memory 
of his Pembrokeshire home was still standing a few years 
ago.^ 

After the passing of the Toleration Act, when zeal was 
no longer fanned by persecution, Quakerism began to 
decline, and it has continued to decline almost steadily 
ever since. To state the various reasons why, so far from 
increasing, it has failed to maintain its numbers would 
be irrelevant, but I may say that, while some of them 
were inherent in the s^^stem, others might have been re- 
moved without damage to its frame- work. Of the causes 
which were matters more of policy than principle, the 
chief was the rule that any member marrying out of the 
body should be disowned. The disastrous effects of this 
rule were actual and potential : it lost to the society 
thousands of actual members, and, in their children, 
thousands more of potential members. 

In Pembrokeshire all the causes operated on a com- 
munity already depleted by emigration. The rapid loss 
of strength after the emigration is illustrated by the 
fact that, whereas between 1682 and 1691 three of the 
ten Yearly Meetings^ for Wales were held in the county, 
only five of the ninety-six between 1692 and 1797 were 
held in Pembrokeshire. 

At the end of the 17th century there were meetings 
with or without houses at Haverfordwest, Redstone, 
Puncheston, Jamestown (near Manorbier), Newport, and 
St. Davids. Regular meetings were discontinued at 
Puncheston in 1725, at Newport in 1726, at St. Davids 



1 For the names of some of the emigrants see Appendix II. 
* The places of meeting were : Redstone, 1682 ; Haverfordwest, 
1684, 1691, 1715, 1749, 1781 ; Tenby, 1743 ; Pembroke, 1766. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 27 

in 1732, at Redstone in 1766, and at Jamestown in 1777,^ 
though meetings might be held in the derelict chapels when 
a travelling minister visited the county, and we hear of 
marriages celebrated in them even when they were nearly 
roofless.^ In January, 1714 (and again in June, 1723), 
the only meetings reported to be collecting for the 
' general service ' were Haverfordwest, Redstone, James- 
town, and St. Davids. 

As a kind of compensation for the loss which the 
Society suffered towards the end of the 17th century 
by emigration to America, there was a small immigration 
from America towards the end of the i8th century, 
when the Starbucks and other Friends came over to found 
Milford.^ Their meeting was started in the autumn of 
1794, and their meeting-house was opened on March 3rd, 
181 1. Even with this accession of strength there were 
only fourteen members in 1829, and no member had 
been admitted ' by convincement ' since 1800. I believe 
that the last member to be so admitted was George 
Phillips (universally known as ' the Quaker ' during my 
school-days at Haverfordwest), who was received in 1857 
into the Society whose traditional virtues he fully ex- 
emplified. 



1 These dates are taken from the Minutes of the Pembrokeshire 
Monthly Meeting, now preserved in Devonshire House. 

2 The burial ground for the Redstone district is at Trewern, half- 
way between Llanddewi Velfrey and Whitland ; that for the Punches- 
ton district at Martel, about half a mile east of Little Newcastle ; 
and that for the Haverfordwest district on the Mount, Portfield. A 
good many of the early Friends were buried at West Hook, though I 
do not know why that place was chosen, or whether the yard is still 
preserved. 

3 As I am dealing with the Pembrokeshire Quakers, the history of 
these Americans is beside my purpose. It has already been told in 
The Builders of Milford by Miss Flora Thomas, who had access to a 
very interesting series of private papers. 



28 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

APPENDICES. 



Of the sufferers named^ by Besse the following certainly 
belonged to the county of Pembroke : — 

Haverfordwest. William Bateman and his 
wife, Evan Bowen (Prendergast), John Burge, Mary 
Eddowe, Morgan Eynon (Besse has * Eyron ') and 
Joan his wife, James (Gawler says ' Jennit ') Jones, 
Francis Lloyd (Prendergast), Hugh Lloyd, Catherine 
Lockyer, Elizabeth Luntly, Peregrine Musgrave, 
Henry Relief and Elizabeth his wife, James Thomas, 
Nell Woolford. 

RuDBAXTON. Edward Lord. 

Llanddewi VeIvFrey. Lewis David and Susan 
his wife, Evan John,^ Alice Lewis, James Lewis, 
David Rice, William Thomas.^ 

LivAWHADEN. William Thomas (probably the 
preceding). 

1 Besse, probably copying faithfully the names that he found in 
the countless minor lists from which he compiled his ponderous record, 
often gives several spellings of the same name. In this Appendix I 
give the normal spellings. 

2 William Thomas was a frequent sufferer. Besse first mentions 
him under the year 1659 (Vol. I., p. 741), when he was imprisoned 
for ' standing before the minister in the steeple-house.' Gawler 
gives some further particulars (p. 23) : — 

' William Thomas of Llandvey in Pembrookshire for standing 
witness against Stephen Hughes, called minister, in the steeple-house 
of Llandivilio, for which he was apprehended and brought before 
John Elliot, called justice.' 

' Llandivilio ' is Llandissilio, to the living of which David Jones was 
instituted in 1657, at the instigation of his friend, the famous Stephen 
Hughes. Gawler adds : — 

' Though this man, Stephen Hughes, be accounted such a great 
priest in Pembrook and Carmarthen Shires, yet here he is made manifest 
to be a persecutor and a striker, who struck Evan John of the Parish 
of Llandeny in the county aforesaid, in the presence of William Thomas 
and George Howel of the said parish.' 

Though Gawler doubtless thought that he was writing the truth 
we are not bound to believe that Stephen Hughes was ' a persecutor 
and a striker ' because Quakers who had been victims to the zeal of 
some of the clergy were not likely to examine the evidence critically 
when they heard any ' priest ' accused of harshness. 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 29 

Narberth. John Husband, Evan Protheroe. 

Redstone. Thomas Ellis, Henry Lewis. 

RoBESTON Wathen. Harry Lewis, John Poyer. 

Tenby. David Hitchins, William Jenkins, James 
Lewis. (Gawler mentions Thomas Barrett as a 
Friend living here in 1659.) 

PuNCHESTON. David Lawrence, Thomas Simons 
and his wife and their sons Hugh, John, and Evan. 

Henry's Moat. Evan Simons (possibly the Evan 
Simons of Puncheston). 

SpittaIv. William Owen. 

CastIvE Bythe. Maurice Llewelyn, Mary Llewelyn. 

Wiston. James James. 

Llandissiuo. Richard Evan, George Lewis. 

LivANYCEFN. Thomas Griffith. 

Langolman. Lewis James. 

Ii^MiSTON (? Uzmaston). Richard Hayes. 

Re YN ALTON. Thomas Willis. 

Hacsket (? Hacket near Reynalton), John Harris. 

Besse does not say where the following lived, but, as 
they were imprisoned at Haverfordwest, we may presume 
that they lived in Pembrokeshire, except when we know 
them to be visitors : — 

Henry Clayton, Robert Cornock, Thomas David, 
John Davis, David Edward, Henry Edward, Laurence 
Edward, Margaret Edward, Henry Evan, William 
Fortune,^ Abigail the wife of William Gray, Howel 



1 William Fortune may have been the father of the George Fortune 
respecting whom the Men's Meeting held at Haverfordwest on ' the 
1 6th 5" [July] 1703 ' passed the following curious resolution : — 

' In as much as we have had information of George Fortune dis- 
orderly walking & y* he do not in sevrall respects answer y^ profesion 
he have made of truth not wth standing he have often admonished & 
counseld by sevrall frds & in o' monthly meeting in y« 3" last sent 
2 frds from the meeting to advise him and to let him know y' frds 
desired him to be at y^ meeting y^ 4" following, he not answering y^ 
s*^ request & slighting all advice & endeavours y* have been used for 
his good do persist in his obstinat will & slights frds & meetings there- 
fore we can not have unity wth him or esteem him as one of y'' [our] 
communion unless he repent & forsake y® evill of his way.' 



30 The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 

Griffith, Rice Harris, John Hilline, John Holmes 
(PHolme), Elizabeth Howel, John Howel, Thomas 
Kent, James Lewis, John Lewis, Griffith Morgan, 
Maurice Owen, Philip Price, David Simons, Francis 
Simons, Ursula Simons, Richard White, Thomas 
William, David Williams, Edmund Williams, Hum- 
phry Williams, and Rebecca his wife, Rebecca Wil- 
liams, jun. 

Visitors : Alice Birkett, Elizabeth Holme (? John 
Holme), James Picton, Richard Poole. 

The following probably lived in the county : — 

Maurice Cole, John Evans, Edward Griffith, John 
Griffith, Joseph Griffith, William Hillay, David 
Jones, Griffith Jones, Owen Lewis. 

The following possibly lived in the county : — 

Arthur Bewes, Amos Davies, Evan Davies, Rice 
Evans, Maurice Humphrey, Elizabeth John, Morgan 
John, Susan Mansell, John Meredith, Pierce Morris, 
Philip Price, John Reynolds, William Reynolds, 
John Richards, Ellis Roberts, John Robins, John 
Williams. 

2.— C6e emigrants* 

The following names of Pembrokeshire Friends who 
emigrated are taken from a list (unfortunately 'not 
intended to be exhaustive ') in Glenn's Welsh Founders 
of Pennsylvania : — 

Haverfordwest. Janet Humphries, maid to 
George Painter, emigrated 1683. David Jones, 
husbandman, em. 1699 — 1700. Samuel Jones, 
husbandman ; doubtless the Samuel John con- 
cerning whom there is a testimony in the ' Memorials 
of deceased Ministers.' He is there said to have 
been born in 1680, em. 1709, d. 16/10/1766 



The Quakers of Pembrokeshire. 31 

Francis Lloyd (B),^ shoemaker, em c. 1686. George 
Painter, em. 1683. 

Llanddewi VeIvFREy. Lewis David (B). Rees 
Hent, yeoman, em. 1688 ; returned to fetch his 
family, 1694. Alice Lewis (B), d. of James Lewis, 
em. 1 710, m. Hugh Evans. John Lewis, yeoman, 
her brother, em. 1710. John Rice (given in Glenn's 
list as from ' near Redstone '), a minor, s. of David 
Rice ; em. 1696 ' with the consent of his parents.' 

Narberth. John ScourjBeld. 

Redstone. Thomas Ellis (B), em. 1683 ; Francis 
Jones, em. 171 1 ; Daniel Lewis, em 1701-2 ; Henry 
Lewis. 

Tenby. William Jenkins (B), ' emasculator.' 

PuNCHESTON. David Lawrence (B), em. 1683 with 
Thomas Ellis, whose d. he m. 

Castle Bythe. William Howel, em. c. 1683. 
Maurice Llewelyn (B), gentleman, b. 1645, em. 
1686. 

Li.ANDissii.io. Francis Howel, m. Margaret Morti- 
mer, em. 1684, d. 1696. 

Ilmiston (PUzmaston). John Hayes, husbandman, 
s. of Richard Hayes, sen., em. 1687 ; Richard Hayes, 
sen. (B), yeoman, em. 1687, d. at an advanced age 
in 1697 ; Richard Hayes, his wife Issett, and his 
sons Richard and John. 

L1TT1.E NewcastIvE.^ Morgan David, yeoman, em. 
before 1694. 

Bayvii,. James Rowland, gentleman, of Rhos y 
Bayvil, em. 1700 ; John Rowland, his brother, 
em. before 1715. 

The following are simply said to be of ' co. Pembroke ' : 
Griffith John, a minister, b. 1683, em, 1709, d. 1778. 

1 (B) one of the sufferers mentioned by Besse. 

* Glenn says ' Lithrens Castle,' but I know of no place of that name 
in the county, and Little Newcastle is about as far west as Castle 
Bythe is east of the centre at Puncheston, and there is a Quaker burial 
ground near it. 



32 The Qiiakcrs of Pembrokeshire. 

John Lewis (B), yeoman, em. 1683, d. 1704. 
Thomas Owen, yeoman, em. before 1692 ; Philip 
Price (B), husbandman, em. before 1692 ; Owen 
Thomas came to Penn. on a visit, 171 9, and is sup- 
posed to have stayed ; Simeon Thomas, husband- 
man, em. 1708. 

The following names mentioned by Browning are not 
in Glenn's list : — 

From Redstone, Henry, Samuel, and Elizabeth, 
children of Henry Lewis. 
From Llangefn. Owen Thomas. 

Probably from Llanddewi. Henry, Nathan, and 
John David Thomas ; John Lewis, sen. and jun. 
Place unknown. David Hugh, Griffith Owen. 



Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen 

(Continued from Vol. VIII.^ p. 66.) 

TBaptisms. 



Mar. 27. 
Apr. 15. 
Apr. 22. 
May 8. 
May 9. 
May 23. 
May 23 
May 25 
May 25 
May 26 
Jun 13 
Jun. 21 
Jul. 6. 



1671. 

Mary d.^ of Edward Gower. 

Mary d. of John Williams, esq. 

Henry s. of John Watter. 

Rowland s. of John Gallon. 

David s. of Gharles Lenoy. 

Elizabeth d. of John Okeley, alderman. 

Evan s. of David William of Priory Street, tailor. 

Robert s. of David Lewis, tyler, Priory Street. 

Elen d. of Thomas Harry of King Street. 

Sara d. of Mervill Bevans of Dam Street. 

Evan s. of Thomas Rees of Frances.^ 

Richard s. of Thomas Rees of Frances.* 

Elizabeth d. of Robert Hugh. 



. 1 A uniform system has been adopted as in the case of the marriage 
entries of this parish, published in the two preceding volumes. For 
economy of space the letter s. is used as a contraction for son, and 
the letter d. for daughter, and ds. for daughters. The early portions 
of the Register being in Latin, it has been impossible to be certain 
as to the correct translation of several names owing to the fact that 
the Latin word is often the equivalent of two or more EngUsh names. 
Thus Jacobus may mean James or Jacob ; Maria is the equivalent of 
Mary or Maria, while Riceus is indifferently used for Rees, Rice, or 
Richard, though in Welsh documents it generally means Rees or Rice. 
In the following translation the words mentioned above have been 
respectively translated James, Mary, and Rees, unless there were 
good reasons for adopting the other synonyms. In the Registers and 
Transcript Registers some entries have been inserted out of order of 
date, but have been in this translation put in their proper places. 
In connection with the baptismal entries the reader should consult 
Parish Registers in West Wales, published in West Wales Historical 
Records, Vol. VII., p. 165. 

* i.e., of the Franchise. The borough of Garmarthen was divided 
into five wards, namely King Street Ward, St. Mary Street Ward, 
Gell Street Ward, and the Upper Franchise and Lower Franchise. 
It is not clear whether the Upper or the Lower Franchise is referred 
to in this entry. 



34 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Jul. 13. Elizabeth d. of David Davids of Dam Street. 

Jul. 31. Thomas s. of Thomas Rees of Trevechan. 

Jul. 31. Thomas s. of Rowland Moris. 

Jul. 31. Richard, s. of David Richard. 

Aug. 6. Anne d. of Evan David Harry of Frances.^ 

Aug. 20. Jonathan s. of Richard Watkin. 

Sep. 7. George s. of Evan Thomas, glazier. 

Sep. 10. Matilda d. of Richard Evans of Frances.^ 

Sep. 24. Nicholas s. of John Edwards. 

Sep. 24. Charles s. of Maurice Harry. 

Sep. 26. Margaret d. of Jenkin Rees, hatter. 

Oct. 1. William s. of Watkin John Gwyn of Frances.^ 

Oct. I. Katherine d. of David Rees, tailor. 

Oct. I. John s. of John Williams, mason. 

Oct. I. Michael s. of Rees David of the Gorse. 

Oct. 8. Thomas s. of William Jones, drover. 

Oct. 8. Robert s. of Evan Morgan, 

Oct. 12. Thomas s. of Thomas Bevans, clerk, vicar of Llandilovaure. 

Oct. 23. Rees s. of Howell Rees of Frances.^ 

Oct. 28. Katherine d. of Thomas Rees, tucker. Priory Street. 

Oct. 31. Charles s. of John Williams of Foeslase. 

Oct. 31. James s. of Richard Woods. 

Nov. 16. Walter s. of Walter Harryes, corvicer. 

Nov. 23. Richard s. of Thomas Bowen, apothecary. 

Nov. 24. Burgess s. of Richard Weekes. 

Dec. 5. Richard s. of Okeley Leigh. 

Dec. 27. Robert s. of John Dempsy. 

Dec. 31. Amy d. of Thomas Rees. 

Jan. 2. Robert s. of Grif&th Moris. 

Jan. 31. Martin s. of Howell David. 

Jan. 31. George s. of George Evans, dyer. 

Feb. 2. Lewis s. of Teg Rudderch, mariner. 

Mar. 19. Daniel s. of David John, carpenter. 

Mar. 19. David s. of David John, carpenter. 

Mar. 23. Thomas s. of Henry David Jenkin. 

1672. 

Apr. 9. Ester d. of Owen David. 

Apr. 14. Thomas s. of Henry Jenkin. 



1 i.e., of the Franchise. The borough of Carmarthen was divided 
into five wards, namely King Street Ward, St. Mary Street Ward, 
GeU Street Ward, and the Upper Franchise and Lower Franchise. It 
is not clear whether the Upper or Lower Franchise is referred to in this 
entry. 



Baptisms, 1672. 35 

Apr. 14. Mary d. of John Griffith. 

Apr. 14. David s. of Thomas Hugh. 

May 16. Christopher s., and Jane d. of John Williams. 

May 27. Elizabeth d. of George David. 

Jun. 6. Elizabeth d. of Morgan Matthew. 

Jun. 8. Charles s. of Richard Low. 

Jun. 16. Catherine d. of Thomas Brookes. 

Jun. 30. Thomas s. of William James. 

Jul. 10. James s. of John Phillip. 

Jul. 15. Mary d. of Thomas David. 

Jul. 21. Roger s. of Rees Thomas. 

Jul. 28. George s. of Richard Lloyd. 

Jul. 28. Thomas s. of John Thomas. 

Aug. II. Anne d. of Richard Price. 

Aug. 16. Edward s. of Thomas Jones. 

Aug. 18. Richard s. of Maurice David. 

Sep. 10. Sage d. of Griffith Humphrey. 

Sep. 13. Charles s. of Charles de Lanoy. 

Sep. 15. David s. of Lewis Evan. 

Sep. 26. John s. of John Edwards. 

Oct. 2. Thomas s. of John Jones. 

Oct. 6. David s. of Evan Morgan. 

Oct. 13. Maud d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Oct. 19. Margaret d. of Thomas Harry. 

Oct. 27. Margaret d. of William Jones. 

Nov. 17. Lettice d. of Griffith Lewis. 

Nov. 24. Anne d. of John Games. 

Dec. I. Rachel d. of Thomas William. 

Dec. 5. David s. of Robert Smart. 

Dec. 8. Edward s. of John Rees. 

Dec. 22. Jane d. of John William. 

Dec. 29. Phillip s. of Thomas Rees. 

Jan. 5. Jane d. of William Vaughan. 

Jan. 8. Edward s. of Edward Gower. 

Jan. 12. Rees s. of Thomas Rees. 

Jan. 12. Elenor d. of John Walter. « 

Jan. 16. Grissel d. of Thomas William. f-% 

Jan. 21. Rees s. of Charles Lewis. j^f^-^O*"* 

Feb. 9. Roger s. of Thomas Harry. ^^X/''' 

Feb. 19. Margaret d. of Robert Hugh. ^^ 

Feb. 23. Margaret d. of Richard Evan. 

Mar. II. Sara d. of Gwalter Thomas. 

Mar. 16. Hester d. of Thomas Richard. 

Mar. 20. Maud d. of Thomas David Mredyth. 



36 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 



1673. 

Mariamne d. of Richard Weekes. 

Edward s. of John Read. 

Thomas s. of Jenkin Rees. 

Richard s. of Richard Phillips. 

Thomas s. of William Davy. 

Blanch d. of Griffith Samuel. 

Sara d. of Griffith Rees. 

George s. and Elizabeth d. of George Ketchmet. 

Sage d. of Richard John Rees. 

David s. of Richard Thomas. 

Mary d. of Evan John. 

Catherine d. of Richard Eynon. 

Gwalter s. of Gwalter David. 

Ruth d. of Griffith Thomas. 

John s. of Owen Thomas, clerk. 

Anthony s. of Martin Lewis. 

Jane d. of Mredyth John. 

Daniel s. of Daniel Richard. 

Anne d. of Matthias Jones. 

Sydney d. of Thomas Watkins. 

Elyzabeth d. of David Rees. 

Edward s. of Thomas William. 

Rebecca d. of Richard Woodes. 

Mary d. of David Lewis. 

Richard s. of Evan Hugh. 

Margaret d. of Stephen Weeden. 

Ginnett d. of Roger William. 

Anne d. of Rowland Morris. 

Jane d. of Evan David Hary. 

Catherine d. of Morris James. 

Emu4a d. of Gwalter Haries. 

Rebecca and Sarah ds. of Robert Lewis. 

John s. of John Phillips. 

Catherine d. of Thomas Harry. 

Thomas s. of Richard Chamberlaine. 

Elizabeth d. of Thomas Bevan, clerk. 

Sarah d. of Thomas Hugh. 

Gwalter s. of William Jones. 

Charles s. of Evan Morgan. 

Jane d. of Roger Powell. 

John s. of Thomas Rees. 

Richard s. of Lewis Eynon. 

Rees s. of John Williams, esq. 

Catherine d. of Robert Griffith. 



Apr. 


7- 


Apr. 


7- 


Apr. 


14. 


Apr. 


iS. 


Apr. 


27. 


Apr. 


29. 


May 


4- 


May 


15- 


May 


29. 


Jun. 


IS- 


Jun. 


IS- 


Jun. 


26. 


Jun. 


29. 


Jul. 


13- 


Jul. 


18. 


Jul. 


19. 


Aug. 


31- 


Oct. 


14- 


Oct. 


19- 


Oct. 


19- 


Nov. 


, I. 


Nov. 


, 2. 


Nov. 


, 2. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


23- 


Nov. 


21. 


Nov. 


23- 


Dec. 


7- 


Dec. 


9- 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


28. 


Dec. 


28. 


Dec. 


29. 


Jan. 


7- 


Jan. 


9- 


Jan. 


13- 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


30- 


Feb. 


I. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


IS- 


Feb. 


IS- 



Baptisms, 1673. 37 



Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


22. 


Mar. 


I. 


Mar. 


13- 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


29. 


Apr. 


5- 


Apr. 


5- 


Apr. 


5- 


Apr. 


6. 


Apr. 


27. 


Apr. 


30- 


May 


3- 


May 


10. 


May 


17- 


May 


24. 


May 


25- 


May 


25- 


Jun. 


13- 


Jun. 


24. 


Jun. 


25- 


Jun. 


30. 


Jul. 


9- 


Jul. 


19- 


Jul. 


26. 


Jul. 


26. 


Jul. 


27. 


Jul. 


29. 


Aug 


. 14. 


Aug 


. 30. 


Aug 


• 31- 


Sep. 


6. 


Sep. 


26. 


Sep. 


27. 


Oct. 


4- 


Oct. 


18. 


Nov 


. 10, 


Nov 


• 19 


Nov 


• 19 


Dec 


. 6. 



Morgan s. of John Rees. 
Rachel d. of John Morris. 
John s. of David William. 
Richard s. of Griffith Thomas. 
David s. of William Eynon. 
Mary d. of Henry David Jenkin. 
David s. of John Edward. 
Dorothy d. of Oakle Leigh. 

1674. 

Roger s. of Thomas Brooks. 
Richard s. of John David. 
Anne d. of Lewis Evan. 
Catherine d. of John Jones. 
Sara d. of Charles de Luney. 
John s. of Richard Harry. 
Sara d. of Martin Beynion. 
Mary d. of William Eynon. 
Mary d. of Griffith Lewis. 
Sara d. of Griffith Evan. 
Mary d. of Thomas Harry. 
Mary d. of Thomas David. 
Rees s. of Harry John. 
William s. of David Rees. 
Elizabeth d. of Thomas Bowen. 

Katherine d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Sage d. of Thomas Pontun. 

Albon s. of Griffith Evan. 

William s. of Mervil Bevan. 

John s. of Thomas John. 

Rees s. of Grif&th Moris. 

Margaret and Sarah ds. of Morgan Llowarch. 

Sara d. of John Rydon. 

William s. of Jenkin David. 

John s. of William James. 

Thomas s. of Richard Philip. 

Edward s. of Thomas Bevan. 

Lewis and Jennett s. and d. of John Jenkin. 

Rees s. of Owen David. 

Jenett d. of Jenkin John. 

William s. of William Jenkin. 

James s. of John Griffith. 

Lewis s. of John Jones. 

Eleanor d. of Howell Thomas. 

John s. of David Davies. 



38 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Dec. 8. Evan s. of John Thomas. 

Dec. 25. Christmass s. of William James. 

Jan. 7. Stephen s. of Steephen Weeden. 

Jan. 17. Grace d. of Henry Atherton, doctor of medicine. 

Jan. 17. Lettice d. of Lewis Jones. 

Feb. 7. Thomas s. of Thomas Jones. 

Feb. 7. Mary d. of John Collon. 

Feb. 14. Elizabeth d. of Robert Lewis. 

Mar. 7. Maud d. of Thomas Rees. 

Mar. 7. Anne d. of William Eynion. 

Mar. II. Job s. of Moris William. 

Mar. 19. Katherine d. of Samuel Rees. 

1675. 

Apr. 4. John s. of Richard Weeks, clerk. 

Apr. 18. John s. of Thomas David Mredith. 

Apr. 24. David s. of Griffith Humphrey. 

May 6. Sara d. of Edward Jones. 

May II. Elizabeth d. of Lewis Griffith. 

May 13. Thomas s. of Martin Beynon. 

May 15. Sara d. of John Griffith. 

May 18. Joan d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Jun. 4. Anne d. of Nicholas Roberts, clerk. 

Jun. 16. Rachel d. of John Philips. 

Jun. 29. Margaret d. of Thomas David. 

Jul. I. David d. of John Williams, alderman. 

Jul. 4. Gwenllian d. of Thomas Walter. 

Jul. 9. Jane d. of Morgan Thomas. 

Jul. 15. Stephen s. of Walter Thomas. 

Jul. 18. David s. of Thomas Rees. 

Jul. 31. Richard s. of Richard Bruer. 

Aug. 3. Mary d. of David Griffith. 

Aug. 4. Anne d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Aug. 6. Edward s. of Moris James. 

Aug. 8. Mary d. of Walter Harris. 

Aug. 26. William s. of Theophilus Bevans. 

Aug. 29. William s. of Griffith Thomas. 

Aug. 30. Griffith s. of Griffith Reed. 

Sep. 5. Jonathan s. of Richard Kradocke. 

Sep. 5. Richard s. of John Moris. 

Sep. 10. John s. of Lewis Evan. 

Sep. 12. Elizabeth d. of Eynon John. 

Sep. 14. Margaret d. of Richard David. 

Sep. 16. Sara d. of Richard Watkin. 

Sep. 19. David s. of Howell David. 



Baptisms, 1675. 39 

Sep. 19. Ester d. of Thomas David. 

Sep. 26. Rowland s. of Rowland Moris. 

Sep. 26. Lucy d. of Griffith Moris. 

Sep. 26. Margaret d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Sep. 27. Elizabeth and Margaret ds. of Moris Hugh. 

Sep. 30. Elizabeth d. of David Rees. 

Oct. 3. Anne d. of David — . 

Oct. 10. John s. of Moris Harry. 

Oct. 24. Mary d. of William Day. 

Oct. 31. Thomas s. of Thomas Harry. 

Nov. I. Rowland s. of David ap David. 

Nov. I. John s. of David Rees. 

Nov. 2. Sara d. of Mathias Jones. 

Nov. 5. Nicholas s. of John Reed. 

Nov. 7. David s. of William James. 

Nov, 18. Edward s. of David John. 

Nov. 21. Mary d. of Thomas Rees. 

Dec. 10. John s. of Evan Morgan. 

Dec. 14. John s. of Jenkin Rees. 

Dec. 26. Mary d. of Roger WilUam. 

Jan. 2. Elizabeth d. of Oakeley Leigh. 

Jan. 2. Sara d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Jan. 2. Henry and Elizabeth s. and d. of Evan Hugh. 

Jan. II. Elizabeth d. of Edmond Meyricke, vicar. 

Jan. 13. Morgan s. of Walter David. 

Jan. 14. Sara d. of John Ryder. 

Jan. 16. Richard s. of William Jones. 

Jan. 28. Thomas s. of Richard Woods. 

Feb. 2. Richard s. of Charles Lewis. 

Feb. 13. Thomas s. of James Thomas. 

Mar. 9. Anne d. of James Philips. 

Mar. 10. Richard s. of Edward Gower. 

Mar. 12. Marya d. of Robert Griffith. 

Mar. 19. Elizabeth d. of Jenkin John. 

Mar. 19. Alice d. of Morgan Llowarch. 

Mar. 19. Elinor d. of John William David. 

1676. 

Mar. 31. Margery d. of Thomas William. 

Apr. 2. Margaret d. of Thomas William. 

Apr. 6. Richard s. of William Thomas. 

Apr. 10. David s. of Job Rees. 

Apr. 18. Catherine d. of Thomas John. 

Apr. 20. EUzabeth d. of John W^atkins. 

Apr. 21. Harry s. of Thomas Harry. 



40 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Apr. 23. Mary d. of Griffith Rees. 

Apr. 30. Margaret d. of John William. 

May 5. Anne d. of Thomas David Mredith. 

May 9. - Hugh s. of John Ryder. 

May 18. John s. of William Jenkin. 

May 18. Mary d. of John Games. 

May 21. William s. of Samuel Rees. 

Jun. 4. Margaret d. of Edward Hugh. 

Jun. II. Catherine d. of Roger Powell. 

Jun. II. Mary d. of John David. 

Jun. 18. Jane d. of Thomas Jenkin. 

Jun. 21. Jane d. of Richard Evan. 

Jun. 29. Jonathan s. of Griffith Harry. 

Jul. 5. William s. of William Moris. 

Jul. 8. Jane d. of Harry David Jenkin. 

Jul. 18. William s. of Humphrey Panton. 

Jul. 27. Mary d. of Richard Eynon. 

Aug. 3. William s. of Hugh David. 

Aug. 6. Mary d. of Howell Thomas. 

Aug. 10. William s. of Thomas Bowen. 

Sep. 10. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Rees. 

Sep. 20. Rees s. of Thomas Newsham. 

Sep. 24. Dority d. of Lewis Richard. 

Oct. 6. John s. of Richard Philips. 

Oct. 9. Mary d. of John Watkin. 

Oct. II. Samuel s. of John Shadock. 

Nov. II. Thomas s. of Daniel Richard. 

Nov. 12. Thomas, s of Walter Thomas. 

Nov. 12. William s. of Edward Lloyd. 

Nov. 26. Sara d. of Thomas Rees. 

Dec. 5. Anne d. of David Richard. 

Jan. 4. Elizabeth d. of Thomas John. 

Jan. 7. James s. of Thomas Bevan. 

Jan. 20. Elizabeth d. of Howell David. 

Jan. 28. John s. of Richard John Rees. 

Feb. I. Sage d. of William Eynon. 

Feb. 4. Althamia d. of Charles de Lanoy. 

Feb. 16. Elenor d. of David Lewis. 

Feb. 18. Philip s. of Mathias Jones. 

Feb. 18. Mary d. of Theophilus Bevans. 

Feb. 18. Mary d. of Thomas Rees. 

Feb. 27. John s. of John Awbrey. 

Mar. 4. Lodowicke s. of Thomas Gwyn. 

Mar. 6. Roger s. of Richard Weeks, clerk. 

Mar. 13. Rachel d. of Thomas Richard. 



Mar. 


16. 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


19. 


Mar. 


20. 


Mar. 


20. 


Mar. 


21. 


Mar. 


25- 


Mar. 


28. 


Mar. 


29. 


Apr. 


5- 


Apr. 


19. 


Apr. 


22. 


Apr. 


22. 


Apr. 


28. 


Apr, 


29. 


May 


I. 


May 


6. 


May 


27. 


Jun. 


3. 


Jun. 


21. 


Jun. 


22. 


Jun. 


24. 


Jun. 


27. 


Jun. 


28. 


Jul. 


II. 


Jul. 


20. 


Jul. 


22. 


Jul. 


29. 


Aug, 


• 19- 


Aug, 


. 26. 


Aug 


. 30. 


Sep. 


9- 


Sep. 


23- 


Sep. 


30. 


Oct. 


8. 


Nov 


• 4- 


Nov 


• 5- 


Nov 


. 6. 


Nov 


. II. 


Nov 


. II. 


Nov 


. II. 


Nov 


.11. 


Nov 


. 20. 



Baptisms, 1676. 41 

Jonathan s. of Martin Bynon. 
Maud d. of Lewis David. 
William s. of Thomas William. 
Catherine d. of John Rees. 
Margaret d. of David William. 
Thomas s. of Stephen Wooden. 

1677. 

Sage d. of William Gwynn. 

Siscill d. of David Jones. 

Richard s. of Thomas Griffith. 

Elenor d. of John David. 

David s. of Thomas Lloyd. 

Moris s. of Thomas Smith. 

Elizabeth d. of Job Rees. 

Mary d. of Lewis William George. 

Elizabeth d. of John Philips. 

Thomas s. of Edward Jones. 

Margaret d. of Richard Harry. 

Richard s. of James Philips. 

Margaret d. of Owen David. 

John s. of William Evan. 

Anne d. of John Ryder. 

Anne d. of Griffith Morgan. 

William and Lettice s. and d. of John William. 

Grace d. of John Lewis. 

Lucy d. of David Rees. 

Thomas s. of William David. 

Sarah d. of Evan Morgan. 

Isaac and Jacob sons of David Davies. 

Jane d. of John Thomas. 

Sarah d. of Robert Rees. 

Anne d. of William Moris. 

Jane d. of Grifiith Harry. 

Jane d. of Richard Thomas. 

Catherine d. of Thomas Ponton. 

Elizabeth d. of William Jones. 

Maud d. of James Evan. 

Anne d. of Samuel Rees. 

Thomas s. of Thomas Rogers. 

Thomas s. of David William. 

Richard s. of John Watkin. 

William s. of William James. 

Alice d. of Grifl&th Vaughan. 

Mary d. of Moris James. 



42 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Nov. 22. George s. of Richard Jeanes. 

Nov. 30. Catherine d. of William Tucker. 

Dec. 2. Sarah d. of David Rees. 

Dec. 3. Evan s. of Howell Thomas. 

Dec. 9. Margaret d. of Hopkin Rees. 

Jan. 6. Thomas s. of Edward Lloyd. 

Jan. 17. Sarah d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Jan. 20. Griffith s. of Richard Woods. 

Jan. 24. Lettice d. of Anthony Jones. 

Jan. 25. Richard s. of Richard Philips. 

Feb. 12. Richard s. of Richard John Rees. 

Feb. 17. Richard s. of William Jenkin. 

Feb. 17. William and John sons of Eynon John. 

Feb. 22. Hannah d. of David Griffith. 

Feb. 22. Jane d. of Robert Griffith. 

Feb. 23. Robert s. of John Gallon. 

Mar. 3. Jane d. of Richard Watkins. 

Mar. 9. Benjamin s. of John Thomas. 

Mar. 10. Thomas s. of John Awbry. 

Mar. 12. John s. of John Ryder, junior. 

Mar. 14. Elizabeth d. of Mathew Jones. 

Mar. 24. Edward s. of Richard Griffith. 

1678. 

Mar. 25. Mary d. of Thomas Harry. 

Mar. 26. Mary d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Mar. 28. Mary d. of John Jenkin. 

Mar. 28. David s. of John Thomas. 

Apr. 14. Jane d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Apr. 18. Rees s. of Moris Hugh. 

Apr. 25. Richard s. of Nicholas Roberts, clerk. 

Apr. 27. Griffith s. of Griffith Humphrey. 

May I. Dorothy d. of Evan Hughes. 

May 7. Sara d. of Griffith Lewis. 

May II. Catherine d. of John Griffith. 

May 12. Jane d. of Anthony Jones, hatter. 

May 19. Dorithy d. of Harry David Jenkin. 

May 21. Jane d. of Thomas John. 

May 29. David and Anne s. and d. of Richard David, 

Jan. 2. Hugh s. of Griffith Samuel. 

Jun. 9. Mary d. of Moris Griffith. 

Jun. 12. Robert s. of Walter Thomas. 

Jun. 19. William s. of Jenkin Rees. 

Jun. 21. William s. of Ambrose Nicholas. 

Jul. 17. Emmet d. of John Lewis. 



Baptisms, 1678. 43 

Jul. 26. Bridgett d. of John Rider, senior. 

Aug. 18. Mary d. of Jenkin John. 

Aug. 18. Margaret d. of Humphrey Puntan. 

Aug. 25. John s. of John Morris. 

Sep. 15. Charles s. of Charles Lewis. 

Sep. 17. John s. of James Thomas. 

Oct, 3. Owen s. of Owen Martyn. 

Oct. 6. Sidney d. of John David. 

Oct. 20. Morgan s. of Thomas William. 

Nov. 5. Mary d. of Jonathan Scurlock, gent. 

Nov. 6. Anne d. of Griffith Thomas, junior. 

Nov. 28. Thomas s. of Thomas Lloyd. 

Dec. 5. Wickham s. of Thomas Rogers. 

Dec. 8. William s. of Griffith Eynon. 

Dec. 10. Robert s. of Job Rees. 

Dec. II. Anne d. of William Lloyd, junior. 

Dec. 12. David s. of Anthony Jones, gent. 

Dec. 13. Elizabeth d. of William David. 

Dec. 24. Smithyeard s. of Thomas Allen. 

Dec. 29. Jane d. of Griffith David. 

Jan. I. William s. of Griffith Thomas 

Jan. 12, Sarah d. of William Nicholas 

Jan. 19. Walter s. of John William. 

Jan. 26. Ambrose s. of Thomas Lewis. 

Jan. 30. Evan s. of Thomas David Mredith. 

Feb. 2. Hugh s. of Thomas William. 

Feb. 3. Mary d. of Martyn Beinon. 

Feb. 4. Sarah d. of John William. 

Feb. 7. Margery d. of George Oakley. 

Feb. 9. Margaret d. of John Rees. 

Feb. 14. Charles s. of Oakeley Leigh. 

Feb. 16. James s. of Edward Hugh. 

Feb. 24. Edward and Jane s. and d. of Thomas Harry. 

Feb. 28. Lettice d. of Roger Powell. 

Mar. 2. Henry s. of Thomas Griffith. 

Mar. 2. Dority d. of John Walter. 

Mar. 3. Anthony s. of Thomas Fisher. 

Mar. 12. Walter s. of William David. 

Mar. 13. Elizabeth d. of John Awbrey. 

Mar. 13. Richard s. of Thomas Richard. 

Mar. 16. Grace d. of John Lewis. 

Mar. 16. Lettice d. of Richard Joseph. 

1679. 

Mar. 28. John Philips s. of John Philips. 

Mar. 30. William s. of Thomas David. 



44 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Mar. 30. Theophilus s. of Theophilus Bevans. 

Mar. 30. Maud d. of John Thomas. 

Mar. 30. Jane d. of William Moris. 

Apr. 3. Edward s. of James Philip. 

May 4. David s. of Lewis David. 

May 4. Dority d. of David William. 

May 4. Elizabeth d. of Richard Philip. 

May 4. Lucy d. of Rowland John. 

May 13. Thomas s. of John Lewis. 

May 17. Thomas s. of Rowland Moris. 

May 21. Mary d. of Joseph William. 

Jun. 18. David s. of Thomas John. 

Jun. 20. Mary d. of Mathias Jones. 

Jun. 27. John s. of Stephen Weeden. 

Jul. 5. John s. of James Thomas. 

Jul. 10. William s. of Thomas Bowen. 

Jul. 14. Thomas s. of John Thomas. 

Jul. 29. Elenor d. of Moris Bowen. 

Aug. 3. Alice d. of William Griffith George. 

Aug. 5. Elizabeth d. of Griffith Lewis. 

Aug. 13. Anne d. of Richard Lloyd and Margett Morgan. 

Aug. 17. Elizabeth d. of William John. 

Aug. 30. John s. of Einon John. 

Sep. 6. John s. of Nicholas Roberts, M.A., clerk. 

Sep. 16. Altham s. of John Vaughan. 

Sep. 17. Antony s. of Thomas Rees. 

Sep. 21. Edward s. of Maurice James. 

Sep. 24. John s. of Edward Lloyd. 

Sep. 30. Robert s. of William Evan. 

Oct. 8. Jane d. of Griffith Moris. 

Oct. 27. Dority d. of John Thomas. 

Nov. 9. John s. of Richard Griffith. 

Nov. 9. Jane d. of William David. 

Nov. 12. Catherine d. of Howell David. 

Nov. 13. Susanna d. of Griffith Evan. 

Nov. 18. Mary d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Nov. 21. Anne d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Nov. 30. Elizabeth d. of Morgan Evan. 

Dec. 2. Rawleigh d. of Griffith Vaughan. 

Dec. 3. Sydney d. of Thomas Punton. 

Dec. 10. Mary d. of Moris Hugh. 

Dec. 14. EHzabeth d. of Charles de Lanoy. 

Dec. 26. Sara d. of Lewis Thomas. 

Jan. I. Elizabeth d. of John Griffith. 

Jan. 4. John s. of Robert Griffith. 

Jan. 7. John s. of Nathaniel Wooldrige. 



Baptisms, 1679. 45 

Jan. 8. Sara d. of Thomas Rogers. 

Jan. 9. William s. of Thomas Lloyd. 

Jan. 16. Daniel s. of Thomas Warren. 

Jan. 16. Moris and Rees sons of John Grififith. 

Jan. 18. William s. of Owen David. 

Jan. 25. Margarett d. of Richard Woods. 

Jan. 27. Sara d. of Edward Jones, gent. 

Jan. 27. Zacarias s. of Thomas David. 

Feb. 15. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Philip. 

Feb. 17. Evan s. of Richard Eynon. 

Feb. 17. Jane d. of George William. 

Mar. 6. Lettice and Mary ds. of Moris William. 

Mar. 7. Rice s. of Walter David. 

Mar. 8. Richard s. of David Thomas. 

Mar. 19. Judith d. of William Thomas. 

Mar. 21. Hugh s. of George Hugh. 

Mar. 23. Samuel s. of Hugh John. 

1680. 

Mar. 25. Sarah d. of Lewis Griffith George. 

Mar.' 29. Thomas s. of John Rider. 

Apr. 4. Edward s. of William Thomas. 

Apr. II. Lucius s. of Oakley Leigh. 

Apr. 20. Jeremias s. of David Philip. 

May I. Lettice d. of Thomas David Rees. 

May 30. Diana d. of James Philips. 

Jun. 4. Griffith s. of Richard David. 

Jun. 13. John s. of John Mugle. 

Jun. 15. Robert s. of David Thomas. 

Jun. 24. Mary d. of Thomas Fisher. 

Jun. 24. Catherine d. of Joseph William. 

Jun. 27. Elizabeth d. of William Lloyd. 

Jun. 30. Margaret d. of Hugh Griffith. 

Jul. II. Richard s. of Jenkin Rees. 

Jul. II. John s. of Thomas David Jenkin. 

Jul. 15. Bonaventure, illegitimate s. of William Lloyd and Mary — . 

Jul. 16. John s. of Evan Griffith. 

Jul. 18. Frances d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Jul. 20. Evan s. of David Lewis. 

Jul. 25. David s. of John Evan. 

Jul. 29. Elenor d. of Samuel Rees. 

Jul. 29. Elizabeth d. of Richard John Rees. 

Aug. 3. Thomas s. of William Rees. 

Aug. 18. Catharine d. of Griffith Thomas, senior 

Aug. 20. Lewis s. of John William. 

Sep. 3. Elizabeth d. of John Thomas. 



46 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Mary d. of Stephen Weeden. 

Mary d. of Jonathan Scurlocke. 

Mary d. of Richard Jeanes. 

Chatharine, illegitimate d. of John Richard. 

Thomas and Margarett s. and d. of David Evan. 

Jane, illegitimate d. of Evan — . 

Mary d. of David William. 

Elizabeth d. of Grif&th Evans, clerk. 

Alice d. of Richard Griffith. 

Thomas s. of Theophilus Bevans. 

Sydney d. of Moris Hugh. 

William s. of Griffith Evan. 

Sarah d. of Howell Thomas. 

Elenor d. of George Oakley. 

Anne d. of Richard Thomas. 

Robert s. of John David. 

Sarah d. of Edward Hugh. 

Elizabeth d. of Jenkin David. 

Jane d. of William — . 

Elenor d. of Robert Jones. 

Sydney d. of William Nicholas. 

Margaret d. of John David. 

Thomas s. of William David. 

Rees s. of William Eynon. 

Griffith s. of Martyn Bynon. 

Mary d. of Francis Jones. 

William s. of Rees Richard. 

Martha d. of Grif&th Williams. 

Francis s. of Grif&th Eynon. 

William s. of David Thomas. 

Robert s. of Edward Loyd. 

Margaret d. of Griffith Moris. 

Mary, illegitimate d. of Thomas Grififith of Abergwily, and 

Elizabeth Robert. 
John s. of William Grif&th George. 
Thomas s. of William Griffith. 
Thomas s. of Thomas Rogers. 
John s. of Harry Dax, tailor. 
John s. of John Oliver. 
Griffith s. of William Davy. 
Mary d. of Antony Jones. 

1681. 

Mar. 25. Mary d. of John David. 

Apr. 4. John s. of Howell David. 

Apr. 4. Margaret d. of Grif&th Thomas, junior. 



Sep. 


13- 


Sep. 


19- 


Sep. 


22. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


21. 


Nov 


• 4- 


Nov 


• 4- 


Oct. 


25- 


Nov 


• 7- 


Nov, 


. 14. 


Nov, 


, 16. 


Nov, 


• 17- 


Nov, 


. 21. 


Nov, 


. 21. 


Nov, 


. 28. 


Dec. 


2. 


Dec. 


5- 


Dec. 


7- 


Dec. 


14. 


Dec. 


15- 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


26. 


Dec. 


27. 


Dec. 


27. 


Dec. 


30. 


Jan. 


I. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


7- 


Jan. 


16. 


Jan. 


23- 


Feb. 


I. 


Feb. 


4- 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


7- 


Feb. 


10. 


Feb. 


20. 


Mar. 


6. 


Mar. 


13- 



Baptisms, 1681. 47 

Apr. 14. Richard s. of Richard John Rees. 

May 1. Philip s. of William Thomas. 

May 3. Griffith, illegitimate s. of Griffith David Rees. 

May 6. De Lanoy s. of Hopkin Rees. 

May 7. David s. of Thomas Richard. 

May 8. Rees s. of Griffith Morgan. 

May 9. Grisel d. of David Eynon. 

May 14. Edwyn s. of John Lewis. 

May 29. Elizabeth d. of Jenkin David. 

May 29. William s. of William Philip. 

Jun. 13. Sara d. of David Robert. 

Jun. 14. Richard s. of John Richard 

Jun. 15. John s. of Thomas John. 

Jul. I. Robert s. of Robert Griffith. 

Jul. 3. William s. of Thomas Howell. 

Jul. 3. William s. of John Eynon. 

Jul. II. Edward s. of James Philip, Kilymanlloyd. 

Jul. 28. John s. of Thomas David. 

Jul. 30. Lewis s. of John Moris. 

Aug. 14. Elenor d. of Henry David John. 

Aug. 21. Thomas s. of Rees Thomas. 

Aug. 24. Margaret d. of Griffith Morgan. 

Aug. 24. Rees s. of Richard John Rees. 

Aug. 28. Thomas s. of Moris James 

Sep. 4. David s. of Job Rees. 

Sep. 7. Elizabeth d. of Roger Powell. 

Sep. 8. Sage d. of John Rudderch. 

Sep. 16. Edward s. of John Bann 

Sep. 23. Catherine d. of Humphrey Puntan. 

Sep. 25. Jonathan s. of Griffith Humphrey. 

Oct. 19. Rebecca d. of Thomas Harry. 

Nov. 2. Margaret d. of William Morgan. 

Nov. 2, Dority d. of Thomas John. 

Nov. 7. Henry, illegitimate s. of John David. 

Nov. 17 Sheldon s. of Thomas Lyons. 

Nov. 17. Prissilla d. of Thomas Fisher. 

Nov. 24. Elizabeth d. of John David. 

Nov. 27. Mary d. of WUliam Jenkins. 

Nov. 30. Jane d. of John Awbrey. 

Dec. 2. David s. of Thomas Griffith. 

Dec. 2. Jonathan s. of Thomas Allan, 

Dec. 9. Evan s. of Walter David. 

Dec. 9. John s. of John Thomas. 

Dec. 12. Thomas s. of Richard Thomas, 

Dec. 29. Elizabeth d. of John Muggle. 

Jan. I. Jane d. of William Husband. 



48 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Jan. 13. Robert s. of Robert Jones. 

Jan. 15. Edward s. of Edward Lloyd. 

Jan. 17. Evan s. of William Evan. 

Jan. 23. Mary d. of Humphrey Sixe. 

Jan. 24. William s. of John Thomas. 

Jan. 24. Mary d. of Walter Thomas. 

Jan. 28. Mary d. of Thomas Rogers. 

Jan. 30. Sydney d. of John David. 

Feb. 2, Mary d. of William Moris. 

Feb. 5. Margaret d. of John Moris. 

Feb. 12, John s. of William Howell. 

Feb. 12. Robert s. of Hugh Rees. 

Feb. 15. Joan d. of Thomas Grif&th. 

Feb. 17. William s. of Thomas John. 

Feb. 20. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Grifath. 

Feb. 26. John s. of Thomas Bowen. 

Feb. 26. John s. of James Thomas. 

Mar. 2. Sara d. of Joseph William. 

Mar. 2. John s. of Thomas David. 

Mar, 12. Mary d. of James Thomas. 

Mar. 12, Jane d. of Griffith Vaughan. 

Mar. 14. Mary d. of Rowland Morris. 

1682. 

Apr. 7. Alice d. of Hopkin Rees. 

Apr. 9. Elizabeth d. of Martyn Beynon. 

Apr. 19. William s. of John Thomas. 

Apr. 21. Walter s. of Griffith John. 

Apr. 21. Nash s. of Oakeley Leigh. 

Apr. 23. Anne d. of John Evan. 

May 4. Hester d. of Mathew Jones. 

May 8. William s. of William Nicholas. 

May 14. Evan s. of Moris William. 

May 19. William s. of Thomas William. 

May 25. John s. of David Phillipps. 

May 28. Antony s. of Thomas Rich[ard]. 

Jun. 6. Richard s. of Lewis Thomas. 

Jun. 21. Richard s. of Richard Woods. 

Jun. 21. Susanna d. of Jenkin Rees. 

Jun. 22. Elizabeth d. of Richard Watkin. 

Jun. 23. Anne d. of Samuel Rees. 

Jun. 25. Griffith s. of Edward Hugh. 

Jun. 26. Anne d. of Charles de Lanoy. 

Jul. 2. David s. of Stephen Weeden. 

Aug. 18. Elizabeth d. of Griffith William. 



Baptisms, 1682. 49 



Aug. 20. Margaret d. of Richard Lloyd. 

Aug. 20. Elinor d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Aug. 22. John s. of Howell David. 

Aug. 23. Thomas s. of Griffith Lewis. 

Aug. 27. Jonathan s. of Thomas Robert. 

Sep. 10. Charles s. of Robert Griffith. 

Sep. 14. Matilda d. of Eynon John. 

Sep. 15. Elizabeth d. of George Oakly. 

Sep. 24. William s. of Evan Griffith. 

Sep. 25. Jenkin s. of David William. 

Sep. 26. Martha d. of John Ryder, senior. 

Oct. 22. Benjamin s. of John Griffith Phillip. 

Oct. 22. Sara d. of John Thomas. 

Nov. I. Stephen s. of Thomas Howell. 

Nov. I. John s. of John Lewis. 

Nov. 12. Dority d. of David Edward. 

Nov. 12. Elinor d. of John Lewis, soldier.^ 

Nov. 19. John s. of Griffith William. 

Nov. 21. Richard s. of Evan David. 

Nov. 24. Jane d. of George Hughes. 

Dec. 10. William s. of Thomas Rees. 

Dec. 17. Daniel s. of John Richard. 

Jan. 4. Thomas s. of Thomas Rees. 

Jan. 7. Antony s. of Griffith Morgan. 

Jan. 14. Richard s. of John William. 

Jan. 16. Anne d. of Richard Rees. 

Jan. 21. Margaret d. of Francis Jones. 

Jan. 23. Elizabeth d. of Antony Jones. 

Feb. 4. John s. of Thomas Warren. 

Feb. 5. Elizabeth d. of David Robert. 

Feb. 9. Thomas s. of Richard Lewis. 

Feb. II. Mary d. of Rowland John. 

Feb. 17. Walter s. of John Ryder, junior. 

Mar. 8. Rees s. of Joseph William. 

Mar. 9. Anne d. of Walter Rees. 

Mar. 13. Thomas s. of Martyn Beynon. 

Mar. 15. Rees s. of David Thomas. 

Mar. 20. Rowland s. of Thomas Bowen. 

1683. 

Mar. 25. John s. of Maurice Hugh. 

'Mar. 27. Rachel d. of William David. 

Apr. I. Benjamin s. of John William. 



1 This word is supplied from the transcript Register. 
D 



50 Register of Si. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Apr. 5. Mary d. of John Griffith. 

Apr. 14. Margaret d. of Maurice John Rees. 

Apr. 22. Sarah d. of James Thomas. 

Apr. 29. Humphrey d. of Thomas Harry. 

Apr. 29. Lucy d. of Griffith George. 

May I. Thomas s. of Nathaniel Wooldridge. 

May 13. George s. of John David. 

May 13. Anne d. of Jenkin David. 

May 14. Robert s. of Thomas Pikes. 

May 20. Anne d. of Henry Griffith. 

May 30. Mary d. of Thomas Lloyd. 

May 10. Anne d. of Griffith John. 

May 24. Anne d. of Richard Thomas. 

Jul. I. Elizabeth d of William Beane. 

Jul. 4. Elizabeth d. of Theophilus Bevans. 

Jul. 10. Margaret d. of Thomas Lyons. 

Jul. 17. Richard s. of Lewis David. 

Jul. 24. David s. of John Morgan. 

Jul. 26. Richard s. of Thomas David. 

Aug. 12. Margaret d. of Maurice John Rees. 

Aug. 14. William s. of John Griffith. 

Aug. 21. William s. of Thomas Rogers. 

Aug. 26. John s. of Maurice James. 

Aug. 27. David s. of Griffith Lewis. 

Aug. 27. Dorothy d. of Thomas David Jenkin. 

Sep. 2. Sarah d of John Philip, iron smith.^ 

Sep. 18. Matilda d. of Philip Jones. 

Sep. 23. Elizabeth d. of Richard Lewis, iron smith/ 

Oct. I. Rees s. of Walter Lloyd. 

Oct. 5. Anne d. of Rees Thomas Jenkin. 

Oct. 14. Lettice d. of Griffith Thomas, junior. 

Oct. 14. Elizabeth d. of William Griffith. 

Oct. 20. John s. of Owen Martin. 

Oct. 30. John s. of John Walter Rees. 

Nov, II. Elizabeth d. of Griffith David. 

Nov. 23. Catherine d. of David William. 

Dec. 2. John s. of Henry David Jenkin. 

Dec. 12. Francis s. of John Drue. 

Dec. 13. Margaret d. of John Williams of Talley, esq. 

Dec. 18. Elizabeth d. of William Jenkin. 

Dec. 25. John s. of George Richard. 

Jan. 5. David s. of John Thomas. 

Jan. 13. William s. of John Mugle. 

1 This word is supplied from the transcript Register. 



Baptisms, 1683. 



51 



Jan. 13. Richard s. of David Philip. 

Jan. 30. William s. of John Philip. 

Feb. 9. David s. of John Williams. 

Feb. 10. Sarah d. of Robert Griffith. 

Feb. 10. Sarah d. of William Husband. 

Feb. 19. Bonaventure s. of Richard Griffith. 

Mar. 2. William s. of William Evan.' 

Mar. 16. Honora d. of George Oakley. 

Mar. 16. Mary d. of John Evan Lewis. 

1684. 

Apr. I. Walter s. of Thomas Griffith Philip. 

Apr. I. Jane d. of John Bann. 

Apr. 4. Jane d. of Lewis Powell, notary public. 

Apr. 6. John s. of Thomas David Meredith. 

Apr. 8. Hester d. of William Moris, corvicer. 

Apr. 27. David s. of John Richard, corvicer. 

Apr. 29. Sheldon s. of Oakly Leigh. 

May 3. Margaret d. of David Robert. 

May 8. David s. of Rowland Moris. 

May 10. Lewis s. of Stephen Weeden. 

May II. Margaret d. of John Rhyddro. 

May 24. Tabitha d. of Howell David. 

May 25. Mary d. of John William. 

May 29. Robert s. of William Rees. 

Jun. 12. Sara d. of William Husband. 

Jun. 17. Elenor d. of John David, saddler. 

jun. 22. Jonathan s. of John Moris Mathew. 

Jun. 29. Letice d. of Jenkin Rees, hatter. 

Jun. 30. Edwyn s. of John Lewis, corvicer. 

Jul. 20. Benjamin s. of Thomas John. 

Jul. 22. Samuel s. of Samuel Rees. 

Jul. 23. Humphrey s. of Griffith Humphrey. 

■'^ug. 3. Jenet d. of David Davies. 

Aug. 4. John s. of Griffith Williams, clerk. 

Aug. 10. Thomas s. of David Lewis, chamberlain. 

Aug. 18. Diana d. of David John, drummer. 

Aug. 24 John s. of Daniel Thomas. 

Aug. 27. William s. of Robert Evan. 

Aug. 29. Catherine d. of George Harys. 

Sep. 7. Sara d. of William Coal. 

Sep. 7. Mary d. of Richard David. 

Sep. 21. David s. of William Morgan, hatter. 



1 This entry is not in the Register, 



52 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Sep 28. Thomas and Mary s. and d. of Richard Lloyd, corvicer and 

jailer for co. Carmarthen. 

Oct. I. Jane d. of William Thomas. 

Oct. I. Catherine, illegitimate d. of John Price and Jane Evan. 

Oct. 3. John s. of Thomas Lloyd, gent. 

Oct. 12. Mathew s. of Thomas Griffith. 

Oct. 20. John s. of James Morgans, gent. 

Nov. 2. Sara d. of Robert William. 

Nov. 6. Henry s. of David Rees, clerk. 

Nov. 10. Elenor d. of Thomas John, tanner. 

Nov. 19. William s. of George Lloyd, hatter. 

Dec. 14. Thomas s. of Griffith Morgan, corvicer. 

Dec. 19. Sara d. of Richard Woods, saddler. 

Dec. 23. Thomas s. of Thomas Rogers, corvicer. 

Jan. 3. Thomas s. of Joseph William. 

Jan. 13. Samuel s. of John William. 

Jan. 16. Joan d. of Thomas Manwaring, gent. 

Jan. 21. John s. of Edward Lloyd, hatter. 

Jan. 22. Edward s. of Richard Thomas, junior, hatter. 

Jan. 24. Maud d. of Roger Powell. 

Jan. 25. Moris s. of James Thomas. 

Jan. 25. William s. of Richard John Rees. 

Feb. 8. Elizabeth d. of Edward Hugh. 

Feb. 8. Mawd d. of David Edward. 

Feb. 15. Rees s. of David Eynon. 

Feb. 15. Anne d. of Walter Rees Howell. 

Feb. 19. Bonaventure s. of Rees Richard. 

Feb. 26. Jenett d. of Richard Lewis. 

Feb. 27. Anne d. of Thomas Bowen, apothecary. 

Mar. I. Jonathan s. of George Oakley. 

Mar. I. Anne d. of John Evan Lewis. 

Mar. 2. William s. of Theophilus Bevans, gent. 

Mar. 15. George s. of Richard Rees Howells. 

Mar. 19. Jenett d. of James Thomas. 

1685. 

Mar. 29. Sara d. of George David, corvicer. 

Apr. I. Anne d. of John Philips, alderman. 

Apr. 12. Catherine d. of George Hughes. 

Apr. 12. Walter s. of Griffith Lewis, labourer. 

Apr. 15. Jane d. of Thomas John, tanner. 

Apr. 24. Anne d. of Walter Thomas, glover. 

May 3. William s. of Moris Bowen. 

May 3. David s. of Lewis David. 

May 14. Elizabeth d. of John Griffith David. 



Baptisms, 1685. 53 



May 


17- 


May 


24. 


May 


28. 


Jun. 


21. 


Jun. 


28. 


Jul. 


19. 


Jul.: 


26. 


Jul.: 


26. 


Jul.: 


26. 


Aug. 


2. 


Aug. 


16. 


Aug. 


16. 


Aug. 


19. 


Aug. 


22. 


Aug. 


25- 


Aug. 


30. 


Aug. 


30. 


Sep. 


6. 


Sep. 


17- 


Sep. 


18. 


Oct. 


7- 


Oct. 


II. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


25- 


Oct. 


25- 


Nov. 


, 6. 


Nov. 


• 13- 


Nov, 


• 15- 


Dec. 


I. 


Dec. 


8. 


Dec. 


13- 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


20. 


Dec. 


23- 


Dec. 


24. 


Jan. 


3- 


Jan. 


3- 


Jan. 


7- 


Jan. 


15- 


Jan. 


16. 


Jan. 


24. 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb 


. 6. 


Feb, 


, lO. 


Feb 


. 10. 



Hanna d. of William James. 

Margaret d. of David Evan. 

Lewis s. of John Williams, plasterer. 

Elen d. of Evan Griffith. 

Mary d. of John Richard, currier. 

Elizabeth d. of John ab John. 

David s. of William Thomas. 

Edward s. of John Bann. 

Mary d. of Lewis Thomas. 

John s. of Thomas William. 

Frances d. of William Moris, corvicer. 

Catherine d. of William Lewis. 

Lettice d. of John Jones, weaver. 

Thomas s. of William Nicolas. 

Sara d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Cicill d. of Richard Muggle. 

John s. of Thomas David. 

Richard s. of William Griffith George. 

Mary d. of Antony Willicot. 

Elizabeth d. of Thomas Kensey. 

Edward s. of James Morgan, gent. 

Richard s. of Thomas John. 

William s. of George Harrys. 

Catherine d. of John Ryder, junior. 

Sara d. of Moris James, tanner. 

Lewis s. of Eynon John. 

Elizabeth d. of Nathaniel Wooldridge. 

Mary d. of Moris John. 

Elizabeth d. of Richard Joseph. 

David s. of William Gwynn. 

Sara d. of John Lewis, labourer. 

Elenor d. of Harry John, smith. 

William s. of David Thomas, hooper. 

William s. of James Thomas, labourer. 

John s. of David Lewis. 

John s. of Richard Thomas, senior, hatter. 

John s. of Griffith Williams, gent. 

Anne d. of Richard Thomas, junior, hatter. 

Mary d. of Richard Lewis, smith. 

Sara d. of Thomas Rees. 

Mary d. of Thomas Harry. 

Richard s. of Moris Hugh. 

Mary d. of Richard Woods, saddler. 

Elizabeth, illegitimate. 

Rees s. of Evan David. 

Jane d. of Edward Lloyd, hatter. 



Feb. 


II 


Feb. 


II 


Mar. 


6. 


Mar. 




Mar. 


7- 


Mar. 


7- 



54 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Grif&th s. of John David, saddler. 
Lewds s. of Harry David John. 
David s. of Thomas Bowen, apothecary. 
John s. of William Griffith. 
Elizabeth d. of John Lewis, corvicer. 
Sage d. of Francis Jones, hatter. 

1686. 

Mar. 25. Jane d. of Thomas Lyons. 

Apr. I. John s. of Oakeley Leigh. 

Apr. 3. John s. of John Griffith Phillipp. 

Apr. 5. Elizabeth d. of Phillipp Jones, mercer. 

Apr. 5. William s. of Humphrey Richard. 

Apr. 7. Isaac s. of Jenkin Rees, hatter. 

Apr. 8. John s. of James Price, gent. 

Apr. II. Jonathan s. of George Harrys. 

Apr. 18. Bridget d. of Richard Bloome, gent. 

Apr. 28. Richard s. of David Philipps. 

May 4. William s. of John Ashton. 

May 5. Walter s. of Joseph William. 

May 13. Elenor d. of John Griffith, tyler. 

May 16. Anne d. of John Phillipps, alderman. 

May 16. Sarah d. of Thomas Jenkin. 

May 17. Jane d. of Job Rees. 

May 25. Mary d. of John Rees, currier. 

Jun. 13. Mariamne d. of Thomas Piks. 

Jun. 20. Elizabeth d. of William Griffith. 

Jun. 27. Evan s. of John Thomas, hatter. 

Jun. 29. WilUam s. of Thomas David, ta'lor. 

Jun. 29. Anne d. of William Lewis, corvicer. 

Jul. I. Mary d. of Thomas William. 

Jul. 6. Griffith s. of John Morgan. 

Jul. II. Moris s. of David William Bevan. 

Jul. 18. Robert s. of George Lloyd, hatter. 

Jul. 18. Sara d. of Lewis Harry. 

Aug. 6. Robert s. of William Evan. 

Aug. 8. David s. of Thomas Rees. 

Aug. 8. Mary d. of Humphrey Aubrey. 

Aug. 26. John s. of David Rees, clerk. 

Aug. 28. Thomas s. of Griffith Harrys, glover. 

Sep. 4. Jenett d. of Thomas Robert. 

Sep. II. Jane d. of Samuel Rees. 

Sep. 12. — d. of Johannis Bealth. 

Sep. 12. Elizabeth d. of David William, hatter. 



Baptisms, 1686. 55 

Sep. 18. William s. of Thomas Lewis, hooper. 

Sep, 18. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Lloyd, mercer. 

Sep. 25. Frances d. of Thomas Rogers, corvicer. 

Sep. 26. Griffith s. of Moris John Rees. 

Oct. 3. Catherine d. of Evan Morgan. 

Oct. 5. Mary d. of Edward Rees ab Rees. 

Oct. 8. John s. of John Morgan, gent. 

Oct. 10. David s. of William David, corvicer. 

Oct. 12. Mary d. of John Muggle. 

Oct. 17. Mary d. of Thomas Kensay. 

Oct. 28. Martyn s. of Martyn Beynon. 

Oct. 31. Joan d. of Daniel Thomas. 

Oct. 31. Hester d. of Thomas Griffith Philip. 

Nov. 7. Rachel d. of Jeremiah William, hooper. 

Nov. 7. Jane d. of George Thomas. 

Nov. 14. Mary d. of William Thomas. 

Nov. 20. Catherine d. of David Lewis, gent. 

Nov. 25. Jane d. of Samuel Richard David. 

Dec. 2. Charles s. of Henry Griffith. 

Dec. 16. George s. of William Gwynn. 

Dec. 16. Margery d. of Owen Philip. 

Dec. 19. Elizabeth d. of David John, drummer. 

Dec. 26. Mary d. of Griffith William Eynon. 

Dec. 28. Catherine d. of Thomas John. 

Dec. 31. — d. of Moris James, tanner. 

Jan. 4. John s. of Richard Lloyd, corvicer. 

Jan. 6. Owen s. of Evan Griffith. 

Jan. 9. John s. of John Jones, weaver. 

Jan. 13. William s. of William Lewis, glazier. 

Jan. 17. James s. of Richard Thomas, hatter. 

Jan. 21. Thomas s. of Richard Muggle. 

Jan. 23. Owen s. of Walter Rees Howell. 

Jan. 30. Edward s. of William Coal. 

Feb. 10. Howell s. of Evan David. 

Feb. 18. Mawd d. of Thomas Rees. 

Feb. 26. Mary d. of William Jenkin. 

Feb. 26. Mary d. of John Moris Mathew. 

Feb. 26. Richard s. of James Evan, miller. 

Feb. 28. Mary d. of Thomas John. 

Feb. 28. Mary, illegitimate d. of Edward Richard and Elizabeth Lewis. 

Mar. 2. Martha d. of Edward Mansell, gent. 

Mar. 2. Thomas s. of Howell David, hatter. 

Mar. 6. John s. of Henry Shaddock, smith. 

Mar. 22. Fortunatus, illegitimate son of Benjamin Demsey and 
Elizabeth Kendrick. 



56 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

1687. 

Antony s. of Thomas Bowen, chemist. 

Charles s. of Hopkin Rees, gent. 

Mary and Martha ds. of David John. 

George s. of George Hughes. 

Tabitha d. of John Lewis. 

Sara d. of Hugh David. 

Mary, illegitimate d. of Stephen David. 

Lewis s. of Richard Thomas. 

Thomas s. of Evan David. 

David s. of Thomas Griffith. 

Mary d. of William Rees. 

Elizabeth d. of Maurice John Lewis. 

Charles s. of Charles Delaney, alderman. 

Frances d. of Richard Jein. 

Alse d. of Roger Powell. 

Maurice s. of James Thomas. 

John s. of Robert John. 

Maurice s. of David John. 

Mary d. of Edward Hugh. 

Hanna d. of Thomas Harry. 

Jane d. of Griffith Williams. 

Rachel d. of William Moris. 

George s. of Rees Richard. 

Jane d. of John Rees 

Samuel s. of Thomas Manwaring, gent. 

Elizabeth d. of William Thomas. 

Joan d. of George David. 

Elizabeth d. of Rees Charles. 

Elizabeth d. of William Nicolas. 

Sarah d. of Grif&th John. 

John s. of John Evan Lewis. 

Margaret d. of Griffith Morgan. 

Richard s. of John Bann. 

Mary d. of Maurice John. 

Jane d. of Thomas Harry. 

Christmas s. of William Lewis. 

Sarah [?Jane] d. of James Price. 

Thomas s. of James Morgan. 

William s. of Charles John. 

William s. of Nathaniel Wooldridge. 

Hanna d. of Martyn Beynon, gent. 

William s. of Rees Lloyd. 

d. of Daniel Thomas. 

John s. of Evan Griffith. 



Apr. 


5- 


Apr. 


9- 


Apr. 


12. 


Apr. 


15- 


Apr. 


16. 


Apr. 


24. 


Apr. 


24. 


May 


I. 


May 


12. 


May 29. 


Jun. 


17- 


Jun. 


19. 


Jun. 


30. 


Jul. 


13- 


Aug. 


7- 


Aug. 


12. 


Aug. 


15- 


Sep. 


II. 


Sep. 


II. 


Sep. 


II. 


Sep. 


12. 


Sep. 


15- 


Sep. 


25- 


Oct. 


5- 


Oct. 


17- 


Oct. 


21. 


Nov, 


. 20. 


Nov 


• 25. 


Nov 


. 26. 


Nov 


. 29. 


Nov 


• 30. 


Nov 


. 30- 


Dec. 


2. 


Dec. 


7- 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec, 


. 25. 


Jan. 


15- 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan, 


, 24. 


Jan. 


24. 


Jan, 


, 24. 


Jan 


. 29. 


Jan 


• 29. 


Jan 


• 30- 



Baptisms, 1687. 57 



Feb. 


2. 


Feb. 


7- 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


16. 


Feb. 


21. 


Mar. 


IS- 


Mar. 


IS 


Mar. 


15' 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


19 



Jane d. of Richard Lewis. 
Mary d. of Richard Lewis. 
Mary d. of William Corbet. 
Evan s. of Richard Joseph. 
Thomas s. of George Harris. 
John s. of Sylvanus Jones. 
Charles s. of Robert Bevan. 
Jonett d. of John Richard. 
Thomas s. of George William. 
Elenor d. of William Lewis. 



1688. 



Mar. 31. Elizabeth d. of Edward Rees. 

Apr. I. David s. of Evan David. 

Apr. I. Mary d. of John Williams. 

Apr. I. Mary d. of Robert Lewis. 

Apr. 3. Jane d. of William David. 

Apr. 8. Elizabeth d. of John Bads. 

Apr. 10. Griffith s. of George Lloyd. 

Apr. 15. Thomas s. of Antony Jones, corvicer. 

Apr. 15. Hester d. of Thomas Pikes. 

Apr. 24. David s. of William Jenkin. 

Apr. 29. Martha d. of William Griffith. 

Apr. 29. Elizabeth d. of James Evans. 

May 6. Roger s. of William Jones. 

May 13. Jenett and Gwenllian ds. of Lewis Humphrey. 

May 13. Sarah d. of William Bevan. 

May 31. John s. of William Harrys. 

Jun. 3. Priscilla d. of Carmen Walter. 

Jun. 9. David s. of Thomas John. 

Jun. 10. Edward s. of Francis John. 

Jun. 17. Bonaventure s. of William Cole. 

Jun. 24. Mary d. of Rees Thomas Jenkin. 

Jul. 15. Stephen s. of William Thomas. 

Jul. 17. Jane d. of Humphrey Aubrey. 

Jul. 22. Joan d. of James Thomas. 

Jul. 22. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Williams. 

Jul. 29. Thomas s. of William David John. 

Jul. 30. Mary d. of John Philips, gent. 

Aug. I. Anne d. of Gwalter Thomas. 

Aug. 10. John s. of John Lewis. 

Sep. 23. Johanna d. of Richard John. 

Oct. 2. Griffith s. of Thomas Rees. 

Oct. 2. John s. of Maurice Rees. 



58 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Oct. 4. Roger s. of John Williams. 

Oct. 7. John s. of Morgan Williams. 

Oct. 7. Charles s. of Daniel Thomas. 

Oct. 7. Sage d. of William Gwynn. 

Oct. 9. Rees s. of Thomas Manwayring, gent. 

Oct. 17. William s. of David Bevan. 

Oct. 17. Anne d. of John Thomas. 

Oct. 21. Robert s. of John Morgan. 

Oct. 23. Richard s. of Richard Muggle. 

Oct. 30. Thomas s. of John Rees. 

Nov. II. John s. of Richard John David. 

Nov. 25. Roger s. of Thomas Lewis. 

Nov. 25. Stephen s. of Richard Jones. 

Dec. 2. Thomas s. of Jeremiah William. 

Dec. 9. Thomas s. of Moris Bowen. 

Dec. 14. John s. of John David. 

Dec. 18. Mary d. of Moris Hugh. 

Dec. 30. Richard s. of John Harrys. 

Jan. 3. Mary d. of John Scurlocke, gent. 

Jan. 8. Eynon s. of Thomas John. 

Jan. 8. Anne d. of Philip Jones. 

Jan. 27. William s. of Thomas Harry. 

Jan. 30. Edward s. of Thomas Rees. 

Feb. 13. John s. of Richard Woods. 

Mar. 3. Antony s. of William Morrice. 

Mar. 6. Catherine d. of David Vaughan. 

Mar. 24. Elizabeth d. of Owen Lewis. 

1689. 

Apr. I. d. of Grif&th Morgan. 

Apr. 2. s. of John Richard David. 

Apr. 15. David s. of David Philips. 

Apr. 21. Moris s. of William David. 

Apr. 21. Thomas s. of Antony Lloyd. 

May 2. Elenor d. of Thomas Jenkin. 

May 2. Sara d. of Thomas Lewis. 

May 15. Dorothy d. of Stephen Weeden. 

May 9. Anne d. of Nathaniel Wooldrig. 

May 12. Sage d. of Thomas Griffith. 

May 20. Jane d. of John Muggle. 

May 25. Jane d. of John Shadock. 

May 30. Richard s. of Lewis Humphrey. 

Jun. 9. Elizabeth d. of William Morgan. 

Jun. 16. Elizabeth d. of John Walter. 



Baptisms, 1689. 59 

Jun. 21. Elizabeth d. of Edmond Copner, clerk. 

Jun. 23, Sara d. of Richard Thomas. 

Jun. 28. Henry s. of John Evans, clerk. 

Jun. 30. Grif&th s. of Rees Harrys. 

Jul. 5. Alice d. of Thomas Denham. 

Jul. 25. John s. of Thomas Davy. 

Aug. 3. Edmund s. of Hector Harrys. 

Aug. 4. Daniel s. of Edward John. 

Aug. II. John s. of Richard Rees Howell. 

Aug. II. Blanch d. of John Moris Mathew. 

Aug. II. Mary d. of William Thomas. 

Sep. 26. Mary d. of John Griffith David. 

Oct. 6. Richard s. of Edward Lloyd. 

Oct. 16. Coursey s. of Thomas Bowen, apothecary. 

Oct. 17. Antony s. of David William. 

Oct. 20. Catherine d. of Jenkin Rees. 

Oct. 31. William s. of William Harry. 

Nov. 5. Sara d. of Thomas John, tanner. 

Nov. 14. Anne d. of Robert Lewis. 

Nov. 23. Vaughan s. of John Philips. 

Nov. 28. Mary d. of John Bath. 

Nov. 30. Anne d. of William Thomas. 

Jan. 3. Elizabeth d. of Francis Thomas. 

Jan. 5. Antony s. of Charles John. 

Jan. 5. Elizabeth d. of Griffith Williams. 

Jan. 12. Thomas s. of Thomas Rees. 

Jan. 14. Thomas s. of Evan David. 

Jan. 16. John s. of James Thomas. 

Jan. 21. Jonathan s. of John Scurlock. 

Jan. 23. Mary d. of Maurice William. 

Feb. 2. Mary d. of John Lewis. 

Feb. 2. Margaret d. of William Dennis. 

Feb. 16. Elizabeth d. of James Morgans. 

Feb. 17. Joan d. of John Jones, gent. 

Feb. 23. Richard s. of John Rees. 

Feb. 23. Mary d. of Hugh David. 

Mar. 4. Franklein s. of Stephen Morgan. 

Mar. II. Anne d. of Richard John Richard. 

Mar. 17. Richard s. of Richard Lewis. 

Mar. 20. Benjamin s. of Edward Howell. 

Mar. 21. Peter s. of Antony Lloyd, Butcher. 

1690. 

[Note : The entries for this year are missing.] 



6o Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

1691.1 

Mar. 25. William and Mary, children of Richard John. 

Mar. 29. John s. of Thomas Dicks. 

Mar. 29. fil' of Edward Lloyd. 

Apr. 19. Elizabeth d. of Isaac Williams. 

Apr. 20. Esther d. of David Philips. 

Apr. 23. Frances d. of David Bond. 

Apr. 26. Jonathan s. of Evan David. 

Apr. 26. Elizabeth d. of David Eynon. 

May I. Lettice d. of Evan Davies. 

May 3. Honor d. of Richard Lewis. 

May 3. John, natural s. of Richard Wood. 

May 10. Mary d. of Martin Beynon. 

May II. Elizabeth d. of David William. 

May 14. Lettice d. of John Michael. 

May 16. Anne d. of Evan Griffith. 

May 19. John s. of Thomas Rees. 

May 31. Thomas s. of John Richard David. 

May 31. Margaret d. of William Jenkins. 

Jun. 21. Charles s. of Philip Jones. 

Jun. 21. Martha d. of Rees Thomas Jenkin. 

Jun. 24. Margaret d. of WilUam Griffith. 

Jul. 2. Martha d. of Hector Harries. 

Jul. 5. Thomas s. of Thomas Harry. 

Jul. 5. William s. of William Bevan. 

Jul. 9. Henry s. of William Harry. 

Jul. 14. Maud d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Jul. 17. Lettice d. of Robert Harry. 

Jul. 19. Thomas s. of Thomas Rogers. 

Jul. 19. Anne d. of John James. 

Jul. 26. Katherine d. of John Lloyd. 

Aug. 16. David s. of Maurice John. 

Aug. 16. David s. of Richard Thomas. 

Aug. 16. Mary d. of John Richard. 

Aug. 28. David s. of William Evan. 

Aug. 28. John s. of William Robert. 

Aug. 30. Robert s. of John Davies. 

Sep. 3. William s. of Charles John. 

Sep. 13. Henry s. of Thomas David Bevan, 

Sep. 13. David s. of William Thomas. 

Sep. 13. John s. of Hopkin Daukins. 

Sep. 13. John s. of Howell Thomas. 

Oct. 7. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Griffith. 

^ The entries for this year are missing in the Register, and are sup- 
plied from the transcript. 



Baptisms, 1691. 61 



Oct. 8. David s. of Maurice ap Rees. 

Oct. 13. Samuel s. of John Jackson. 

Oct. 18. Elizabeth d. of Morgan Lewis. 

Oct. 18. William s. of John Morrice Mathew. 

Oct. 24. Roger s. of Roger Baill. 

Oct. 25. Thomas s. of William Cole. 

Oct. 25. Richard s. of John Walter Rees. 

Oct. 27. Althamia d. of Rees David. 

Nov. I. Elizabeth d. of Richard Lewis. 

Nov. I. Honora d. of William Lewis 

Nov. I. Sarah d. of David John. 

Nov. 4. Bridget d. of John Ma . . . 

Nov. 7. Thomas s. of Philip Jones. 

Nov. 8. James s. of [FitzGeraldJ. 

Nov. 12. Mary d. of Griffith . . . 

Nov, 17, Jonathan s. of Tho . . . 

Nov. 19. Elizabeth d. of . . . Morgan. 

Nov. 20. John, natural s. of Richard Stephen. 

Nov. 26. John s. of William Lewis. 

Nov. 29. Rachel d. of John . . . 

Dec. 7. Rachel, natural d. of . . . 

Dec. 13. John s. of William . . . 

Dec. 17. ... fil' of Maurice Hugh. 

Jan. 8. Anne d. of John Thomas. 

Jan. 10. Margaret d. of John James. 

Jan. 10. Mary d. of . . . Richard. 

Jan. 21. Anne d. of Humphrey Richard. 

Jan. 21. Matherine d. of . . . Lloyd. 

Jan. 24. Margaret d. of Gualter Hughes. 

Jan. 27. Jane d. of John Rees. 

Jan. 31. Richard s. of David Robert. 

Jan. 31. Samuel s. of . . . 

Feb. . . Elizabeth d. of . . . Lewis. 

Feb. . . John s. of . . . 

[Several illegible entries occur here. 

Mar. I. Maurice s. of . . . 

Mar. II. Anne d. of John . . . 

Mar. 20. Anne d. of Richard Jones. 

Mar. 22. Elizabeth d. of Thomas Powell. 

Mar fil' of James David. 

1692. 

Mar. 25. Thomas s. of Charles Evan. 

Mar. 30. Anne d. of Thomas Richard. 

Apr. 3. Gualter s. of Richard Rees Howell. 



62 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Apr. 5. Jonathan s. of Stephen Morgan. 

Apr. 5. Sara d. of Maurice James. 

Apr. 17. Mary d. of David Philips. 

Apr. 18. Anne d. of Thomas Jenkins. 

Apr. 21. Sylvanus and George sons of Daniel Jones. 

Apr. 25. John s. of George Morrice. 

May I . Elizabeth d. of Gualter Harry. 

May 3. Sarah d. of Henry Rees. 

May 8. Rebecka d. of Rees Lloyd. 

May 8. Bridget d. of Griffith Morgan. 

May 8. James s. of Henry Shaddock. 

May 15. Charles s. of David Bond. 

May 22. Maurice s. of Thomas Griffith. 

May 22. Anthony s. of Thomas Lewis. 

May 29. Margaret d. of Richard Lloyd. 

May 30. Jane d. of John Beth. 

May 31. Elizabeth d. of Hector Harryes. 

Jul. 7. Hannah d. of John Aubrey. 

Jul. 10. John s. of Thomas John. 

Jul. 10. Humphrey s. of James Evan. 

Jul. 20, Margaret d. of William David. 

Jul. 31. Thomas s. of George David. 

Aug. I. Lewis s. of John Murfil. 

Aug. 2. Elizabeth d. of William Jones. 

Aug. 7. Martha d. of William Meredith. 

Aug. 14. William s. of John Rees. 

Aug. 21. George s. of Richard Thomas. 

Aug. 23 John s. of Abraham John. 

Aug. 28. Elizabeth natural d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Sep. II. Jane d. of Richard John. 

Sep. II. Mary d. of Griffith Lewis Philip. 

Sep. 20. Francis s. of Thomas Rogers. 

Sep. 29. Thomas s. of John Giles. 

Sep. 29. Elizabeth d. of Morgan John. 

Sep. 30. Maurice s. of Maurice Morrice. 

Oct. 4. David s. of Thomas John. 

Oct. 9. Mary d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Oct. 9. John s. of WilUam Lewis. 

Oct. 16. William s. of John Jones. 

Oct. 18. Gualter s. of Evan William. 

Oct. 20. Mary d. of James Corbet. 

Oct. 23. Evan s. of John William. 

Oct. 23. John s. of John ap John. 

Oct. 30. Thomas s. of David William. 

Nov. 5. Margaret d. of Thomas Lewis. 



Baptisms, 1692. 63 

Nov. 18. John s. of George Butterwicke. 

Nov. 20. Jonathan s. of John Losky. 

Nov. 27. Anne d. of James Philip. 

Dec. 4. Mary d. of Maurice John. 

Dec. 15. Lettice d. of Stephen Evan. 

Dec. 15. Anne d. of Mathias Harry. 

Dec. 25. Frances d. of David Hugh. 

Dec. 27. Mary d. of William Robert. 

Dec. 28. Edward s. of Griffith John. 

Jan. 6. Edward s. of Philip Jones, clerk. 

Jan. 8. John s. of David Thomas. 

Jan. 15. Mary d. of Griffith Morgan. 

Jan. 29. Richard s. of Maurice David Bevan. 

Jan. 29. Elizabeth d. of Richard Harry. 

Feb. I. Richard s. of Peter Evan. 

Feb. 5. John s. of Griffith Rees. 

Feb. 9. David s. of John Morrice Mathews. 

Feb. 16. John s. of John Walter Rees. 

Feb. 24. Vaughan s. of John Philips. 

Feb. 26. David s. of Morgan Hancock. 

Mar. I. Elizabeth, Priscilla, Hannah, and Martha, ds. of John John. 

Mar. 17. Jane d. of David John. 

Mar. 19. John s. of Richard John David. 

Mar. 19. Ellu d. of Thomas Rees. 

1693.1 

Mar. 29. Jonett d. of John ap John. 

Mar. 31. Anne d. of Griffith William, gent. 

Apr. I. Sylvanus s. of Daniel John. 

Apr. 5. Ailitha d. of John Edwards, gent. 

Apr. 5. Jonathan s. of Jenkin Rees. 

Apr. 9. Mauld d. of David Evan. 

Apr. II. Joseph s. of Robert Bevan. 

Apr. II. Mary d. of Thomas Rees. 

May I. -Vincent and Gualter, natural sons of John Maddock by 

Anne Morrice. 

May 4. Esther d. of James Morgan. 

May . . Mary d. of William Morgan. 

May 14. Mary d. of Thomas Morgan. 

May 28. Daniel s. of Evan David. 

May 28. Katherine d. of Rees William. 

Jun. 4. Mawd d. of John David. 

Jun. . . Mary d. of John Bynon. 

"■ The entries for this year are missing from the Register, and have 
been supplied from the transcript. 



64 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Jun. II. Jane d. of John James. 

Jun. 18. Gwenllian d. of Lewis Humphrey. 

Jun. 19. Lucy d. of John David. 

Jun. 23. Aron s. of George Ashton. 

Jun. 26. William s. of Gualter Harry Griffith. 

Jun. 26. Moris s. of William David. 

Jul. 2. Thomas s. of John Donne. 

Jul. 4. Griffith s. of James Thomas. 

Jul. 13. William s. of William Harry Rees. 

Jul. . . Benjamin s. of John Yarnall. 

Aug. 8. Richard s. of William Thomas. 

Aug. II. Benjamin s. of Humphrey Richard. 

Aug. 12. John s. of Francis Jones. 

Aug. 20. William s. of John Richard. 

Aug. 27. Rees and Mary children of Maurice Powell. 

Aug. 27. David s. of . . . Charles. 

Aug. 27. Morgan s. of Thomas John. 

Sep. 3. Morgan s. of David Harry. 

Sep. 6. David s. of John Morgan. 

Sep. 6. Martha d. of William [Tery]. 

Sep. 10. Philip s. of Evan PhiUp. 

Sep. 10. Lucy d. of Edward John. 

Sep. 12. Mary d. of Thomas Lewis. 

Sep. 19. Dorothy d. of William David. 

Sep. 20. Anne d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Oct. 6. David and John sons of John Scurlocke. 

Oct. II. William s. of Lewis Bowen. 

Oct. 18. Thomas natural s. of John Muggall. 

Oct. 24. Mary d. of Robert Evan. 

Nov. 7. Sarah d. of Rees David Rees. 

Nov. 8. Josiah s. of Roger Bayle. 

Nov. 12. David s. of Morgan John William. 

Nov. 12. George s. of John Howell. 

Nov. 14. David s. of Morgan Rees. 

Nov. 14. Thomas s. of Gualter Hughes. 

Nov. 26. Sarah d. of Griffith Thomas. 

Nov. 27. Jane d. of Charles John. 

Dec. 2. George natural s. of George Evan. 

Dec. 10. Jane d. of James Paine. 

Dec. 25. Jonett d. of William Thomas. 

Jan. I. Thomas s. of John Newsham. 

Jan. 9. John s. of John Evans. 

Jan. II. Mary d. of Griffith Joseph. 

Jan. 14. Richard s. of Edward Rees. 

Jan. 28. Martha d. of Thomas Harry. 



Baptisms, 1693. 



65 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 28 
Mar. II 



4- 
II. 

17- 
22. 

23- 

27. 



Anne d. of Rouland David. 

William s. of David John. 

Thomas s. of Griffith Morgan. 

Lattice illegitimate d. of Thomas David. 

Hester d. of Philip Jones, clerk. 

Mary d. of David Griffith. 

David s. of Anthony Lloyd. 

David s. of Thomas Rees. 



Apr. 2. 
Apr. 6. 
Apr. 10 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 29 
May 13 
May 13 
May 20 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 28 
Jun. I. 
Jun. 3. 
Jun. 17. 
Jun. 24. 
Jul. 7. 
Jul. 15. 
Jul. 15. 
Aug. 7. 
Aug. 12. 
Aug. 14. 
Aug. 19- 
Aug. 28. 
Sep. 2. 
Sep. 2. 
Sep. 3. 
Sep. 19. 
Sep. 22. 
Oct. 7. 
Oct. 7. 
Oct. 14. 
Oct. 14. 



1694.1 

Elizabeth d. of Evan Griffith. 

Thomas s. of John Aubrey. 

Francis s. of Francis Lloyd. 

Thomas s. of John William. 

Thomas s. of William Thomas. 

John s. of David Andrew. 

Jane d. of Humphrey Aubrey. 

Richard s. of George David. 

Mary d. of Thomas Powell, mayor of the town. 

Anne d. of John Richard David. 

Thomas s. of Richard Philip. 

Maud d. of Maurice William. 

Mary d. of Peter Evan. 

William s. of Thomas William. 

John s. of Edward Lloyd. 

John s. of William Griffith. 

Thomas s. of John James. 

Elizabeth d. of Henry Grifftth. 

Elizabeth d. of John Pikes. 

Hector s. of Isaac Bernard. 

Thomas John Jones. 

Thomas s. of John Jones. 

Gualter s. of Maurice William. 

Elen d. of Evan William. 

William s. of Robert Lewis. 

William s. of Henry David. 

James s. of John Glasby. 

David s. of Thomas Griffith Philip. 

Katherine d. of Thomas Rogers, alderman. 

David s. of John Edwards, gent. 

Richard s. of John Evan. 

Richard s. of William Nicholas. 

Martha d. of Th. Bevan. 



^ The entries for this year are missing from the Register, and have 
been supplied from the transcript. 
£ 



66 Register of St. Peter, Carmarthen. 

Oct. 21. Martha d. of Richard Lewis. 

Oct. 21. Mary d. of John Lloyd. 

Nov. 4. William s. of WUliam Jenkin. 

Nov. 8. Elizabeth d. of Edward Howells, gent. 

Nov. 29. Hannah d. of John Ashton. 

Dec. 12. William s. of Maurice David Bevan. 

Dec. 22. Mary d. of Richard Joseph. 

Jan. 5. fil' of William Morrice. 

Jan. 13. Jane natural d. of Elizabeth Lumley. 

Jan. 13. Sarah d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Jan. 13. Mary d. of Samuel Orchard. 

Jan. 21. John natural s. of Elizabeth Lions. 

Feb. 10. fir of George Butterwicke. 

Feb. 17. Sarah d. of Lewis Richard. 

Mar. 3. William s. of Maurice Hugh. 

Mar. 3. David s. of Evan David. 

Mar. 8. Jonett d. of John Thomas. 

Mar. 10. Mary d. of Thomas Griffith. 

Mar. 10. Mary d. of John Thomas. 

Mar. 17. John s. of Evan Griffith. 

1695-1698. 

[Note : The entries for the years 1695 — 1698 inclusive are missing.] 



[To be continued in Vol. X.'\ 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



By FRANCIS GREEN. 



The recent discovery of a mass of ancient treasures in 
Egypt makes one long for a similar event in this country, 
which would throw light on the social life of the early 
inhabitants of West Wales. Unfortunately, there is 
little probability of a hoard on such a scale being found, 
and investigators have perforce to fall back on such 
meagre records as are at present available. The subject 
is one of very large scope, and it is proposed in this 
article to merely touch on a few of the items coming 
under the heading, and to deal more particidarly with 
Pembrokeshire. 

One of the most important factors in the life of the 
residents of any country is the S3^stem of land tenure 
prevailing in their land. It seems clear from such evidence 
as is available, that in very early days the tribal system 
prevailed in Wales, that is to say the land was vested 
in the tribe and not in the individual, but by the time 
of Howell Dda this sj^stem seems to have become some- 
what modified, and the land appears to have been divided 
into estates belonging to groups of families, each group 
being called a Gwele or bed. The succession of land on 
the death of an Uchelwr or chief of a house in the time 
of Howell Dda, is very clearly explained in the Welsh 
People as follows : — 

' The land of the deceased was first of all divided between 
all his sons. If there were no buildings on the land, the 
youngest son was to divide all the patrimony, and the 



68 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

eldest was to choose which portion he would take, and 
each in seniority chose unto the youngest. If there were 
buildings on the land, the youngest brother but one was 
to divide the Tyddynau (homesteads), and the youngest 
was to have his choice among them ; and after that he 
was to divide all the patrimony, and by seniority they 
were to choose unto the youngest. That division was not 
final, but onl3^ continued during the lives of the brothers. 
After the brothers were dead their sons (first cousins) 
divided the patrimony again per capita, and not per 
stirpes ; the heir of the youngest brother divided, and 
the heir of the eldest" brother chose, and so by seniority 
unto the youngest. This division again was not final, 
but only continued till all the first cousins were dead ; 
when that time arrived there was a final division per 
capita among the second cousins, i.e., the great-grand- 
children of the original head of the Gwele.' 

The Gwele system, or a modification of it continued 
long after the advent of the Normans into Pembroke- 
shire, and in 1326 was still in existence in that county 
as well as in Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire, side by 
side with land held by Norman tenure. For how long 
the Gwele system continued to exist in Pembrokeshire 
is unknown, but there is no doubt that, as the joint 
owners and beneficiaries of such holdings realised the 
disadvantages of the S3'stem, it gradually disappeared, 
and the writer can recollect no trace of its continuance 
after the reign of Richard III. As might be expected, 
the Gweli tenure disappeared earlier in the south half of 
Pembrokeshire than in the north portion. Thus the 
Black Book of St. Davids shows that the Welsh tenure 
had apparently died out in Lamphey by 1326, while at 
Lawrenny there is mention made of only one holding 
which, in 1326, was obviously held under the system. 

The Norman invaders on landing in Pembrokeshire 
naturally seized upon good defencible positions and en- 
trenched themselves with banks and ditches. Having 
made good their foothold they proceeded to strengthen 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 69 

their camps. If timber was available they probably- 
erected wooden pallisades on the tops of the banks, and 
this explains the reiterated statements in the Annales 
Cambrics that the castles were burnt, and very shortly 
afterwards were rebuilt, in an incredibly short space of 
time if the defences had been built of masonry. Con- 
siderably later on stone-built castles were erected. 
There is no record that there were any stone-built build- 
ings in use in West Wales at the time of the Norman 
invasion, or for many years later on, and this absence of 
masonry indicates the set-back in civilization, which had 
occurred after the departure of the Romans from Britain, 
whose substantial stone and brick buildings must have 
been familiar to considerable numbers of the native 
population of England and Wales. 

As the Norman lords gradually established their 
authority over the area immediately round their forts, 
they made small grants of land to their followers, who 
built their houses in close contiguity to the forts. This 
system was advantageous alike to the lords and their 
tenants. The latter in the event of an attack by the 
Welsh were able to seek refuge in the forts, and the 
former thus secured much-needed reinforcements for 
their garrisons. Such grants were no doubt made on 
condition that the tenants should serve, when required, 
in the armies of the Norman landlords. As time rolled 
on traders and small manufacturers, such as w^eavers and 
artizans, settled alongside of the lord's tenants, and 
gradually these settlements became small towns, some 
of which obtained charters giving them certain privi- 
leges. That the above system v/as followed is evident 
from the existing records, which show that the regular 
garrisons of the Edwardian castles in Wales were ex- 
tremely small and entirely inadequate to repel an as- 
sault, and it is obvious that the defence relied on rein- 
forcements from the tenants residing outside of and 
close to the castles. 

For some years after the invasion of Pembrokeshire 



70 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

b}' the Normans, the Welsh inhabitants of the county 
must have been in desperate straits. Their property 
was constantly being destroyed in the struggle between 
the rival Welsh lords, and in addition there were steady 
encroachments being made by the Normans. It is 
singular that this unequal struggle was maintained so 
long. The Normans were frequently shut up in their 
forts, sometimes in dire peril, and at best could at times 
only hold such lands as were practically in sight of their 
strongholds. This may partially be accounted for by 
the fact that it was difficult to get reinforcements owing 
to the feudal system prevailing in England, under which 
the lords there had enough to do to supply their own 
quota of men required for the numerous wars then pre- 
vailing. 

But in time the Normans were able to extend their 
sphere of influence, and to apportion their captured 
possessions amongst their followers to be held under the 
Norman tenure. In some cases, however, for instance in 
Kernes, the Norman lords came to terms with the Welsh 
landowners, and the latter were permitted to hold their 
lands, or such portions of it as they were allowed to re- 
tain, according to the Welsh tenure, which as pointed out 
above was a modification of the tribal system. Norman 
and Welsh tenures thus existed side by side in man^^ 
individual lordships, not onl}^ in Pembrokeshire, but also 
in Glamorganshire. 

Now under the feudal law the land was held to belong 
to the king, who made grants of it to his lords usually 
by knight's service, and these lords in turn made grants 
of portions of the land to their esquires and others on 
very similar terms, and these again often leased the 
land or made grants copyhold or otherwise to sub-tenants. 
Tenants holding by knight's service had to provide a 
certain number of men to serve their landlords in the 
wars, and in addition to this obligation were subject 
to scutage, attendance at fortnightly courts of the manor 
or lordship to which their lands belonged, wardship and 
marriage. 



Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 71 

Scutage was a money payment towards furnishing the 
king's army, and usually amounted to from one to three 
marks per knight's fee. Under wardship the chief lord 
was entitled to the custody of the heir of a deceased 
tenant, and to the rents of his lands until such heir came 
of age, and the chief lord was also entitled to the marriage 
of an heiress of a deceased tenant while she was under 
age, that is to say she could not marry without his consent. 
As a matter of fact the consent was usually given on pay- 
ment of a sum of money by either the aspirant to the 
hand of the lady, or what was often the case to the lands 
of the lady, or else by the father of the aspirant. This 
right of marriage was strictly enforced until the abolition 
of the feudal laws in 1660, and runaway matches were 
then rather dangerous and apt to land the enterprising 
couple into difficulties. In addition to these duties 
some lands were subject to heriots, that is to say the land- 
lord on the death of his tenant was entitled to the best 
horse, ox, or even jewels, the particular article forming 
the heriot being prescribed by the custom of the manor 
to which the land belonged. 

The Norman lords generally divided their lands into 
manors, and the tenants of these manors held their land 
by copyhold ; in other words they usually had no title 
deeds, but when one of them died his heir attended the 
court of the manor, and was admitted as tenant of the 
land previously held by his deceased father, by his name 
being substituted in the rolls of the manor, a fee of course 
being paid for the same. In like manner, when a tenant 
sold his land, he and the purchaser attended the court 
and the vendor having surrendered the land to the lord 
of the manor, the purchaser was admitted, and his name 
entered on the roll in place of that of the vendor. 

The tenants held their land according to the custom 
of the manor and many of these customs were extremely 
curious. For example, the custom of Talley manor in 
Carmarthenshire is that even at the present time, the 
youngest son, or in default of sons, the youngest daughter 
inherits the land, not the eldest. 



72 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

The rights of the lord of a manor even after the Restora- 
tion were valuable. Thus the lord of Picton Castle in 
1685 was entitled to hold Courts leet, Courts Baron, and 
Views of Frank pledge. He was also entitled to heriots, 
deodands, waifs and strays, the goods of felons, fugitives, 
attainted persons, suicides and outlaws, and also to 
treasure trove, wrecks, escheats, fines and amercements, 
in a large number of parishes. In like manner the lord 
of Walwinscastle manor had similar privileges, and in 
addition had free fishery in the waters of Martin's Haven 
Pool, and was also entitled to royalties and to market 
days and markets in Walwinscastle, Sick, and Easting- 
ton. 

Now the clergy usually held their land by another 
tenure. Generally speaking they held either by Frank- 
almoin, under which no services were due to the grantors 
unless it were the prayers of the clergy for the donors, 
or else by socage under which a rent only was paid. As 
the holders of land under these tenures were exempt 
from military service, it is easy to realise that their 
tenants were better off than those holding under land- 
lords subject to knight's service, who were constantly 
liable to be called away to the wars. At the same time 
all the clergy did not hold under these tenures, for in- 
stance the bishop of St. Davids as baron of Llawhaden 
held that barony by knight's service, and there were 
others of the clergy who held on similar terms. 

The bishop of St. Davids was in effect a lord 
marcher prior to 1231, and it is highly probable that 
Norman customs and land tenure had been partially 
established in the lordship of Dewisland by Bernard, 
who was the first Norman to fill the see of St. Davids. 
It is recorded that Henry III. granted and confirmed 
to Adam (probably an error for Anselm), bishop of St. 
Davids, all the rights held by his predecessors, and this 
grant was confirmed by a charter of Richard II. to Adam 
Houghton, who was given by the same charter all the 
liberties enjoyed by any lords marcher in their lordships. 



Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 73 

Apparently this charter appUed not only to the bishop's 
lands in Llawhaden, but also to his possessions in Dewis- 
land. 

Considerable light is thrown by the Black Book of St. 
Davids on the tenures by which the bishop's tenants 
held their houses and lands in the year 1326. These 
tenants may be roughly classified into — 

1. Burgesses, i.e., tenants who held houses and lands in 

towns in the lordship. 

2. Those who held land outside of the towns. 

The burgesses may for our purpose be divided into 
two classes, (a) those who held their tenements and burg- 
age lands by deed, and [b) those who held their tenements 
without deeds. Presumably the last mentioned class held 
their property by copyhold, that is to say, their title 
consisted of entries in the court rolls of the manor, and 
it is more than probable that in the case of those burgesses 
who held by deed, such deeds were required to be enrolled 
on the manorial rolls. 

Tenants of land outside of the towns, in like manner 
held by deed or without deed, and rent payable in cash 
or in kind and other services were, generally speaking, 
payable by all tenants, whether in towns or in the country, 
and the Black Book of St. Davids states that such rentals 
(so far at all events as Trevine was concerned) were fixed 
in the time of Bishop Anselm. 

The limits of the town or borough of St. Davids is 
unfortunately not defined by the Black Book of St. Davids, 
and it might very well be supposed that the borough 
corresponded with the division of the parish known as 
Cylch-y-dre. For the information of those who are un- 
acquainted with the parish, it should be mentioned that 
the parish is divided into cylchs (circles), and these 
divisions still appear in the Rate Books of the parish. 

These divisions of the parish existed prior to 1268, as 
a statute of Bishop Adam Houghton states that Philip 
Caunton, archdeacon of Cardigan, asserted in a petition 
to the bishop, that his predecessors, as canons of St. 



74 Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 

Davids Cathedral, had enjoyed a certain prebend lying 
between the city of St. Davids and the sea (evidently the 
cylch, afterwards known as Cylch Gwaelod-y-mor) , which 
said prebend did not circularize amongst the canons as 
did the other prebends of the cathedral, but had from 
of old, been united to his archdeaconry. 

The divisions in question are known as Cylch-y-dre, 
Cylch Gwaelod-y-mor, Cylch Bychan, and Cylch Mawr. 
It seems clear, however, that if the borough in 1326 
corresponded with Cylch-y-dre, the cylch must have 
subsequenth^ been considerably enlarged, as the area of 
the borough at the former date is stated to have been 
only 73 acres 30 perches,^ while the acreage (of the 
cylch) given in a Rate-book for 1870 is 1515 acres. ^ 
Moreover, the Black Book of St. Davids states that 
the bishop had three water mills, i.e., ' the mill near 
{jiixta) the town of St. Davids ....'; this mill is 
evidently the one now known as Lower Mill, and was, 
therefore, outside of the borough of the City, whereas 
Lower Mill is now in Cylch-y-dre. 

The bishop of St. Davids undoubtedly owned the lord- 
ship of Pebydiauk, but it is not quite clear what this 
lordship comprised in earl}^ days. According to George 
Owen, the Elizabethan historian of Pembrokeshire, the 
lordship was given to the bishops of St. Davids (p. 39) by 
the ancient princes of Wales, that is to say, by Rhys ap 
Tewdwr in 1082, and in another place he states that the 
lordship of Pebydiauk corresponded with the present 
hundred of Dewisland. 

Now according to a MS. written in 1559, Pebidioc was 
a cantred (hundred), containing three commots called 
Mynyw, Pencaer, and Pebidioc, but unfortunately there 
is no accurate definition of the boundaries of these three 
commots. 

1 Welsh acres — A Welsh acre equalled about 2^ Statute acres, and 
on that basis the area of the old borough of St. Davids would have 
been in round figures 159 Statute acres. 

2 The figures do not include waste lands, commons and roads, and 
are said to be estimated. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 75 

Mynyw was undoubtedly the district in the immediate 
vicinity of the City of St. Davids, and Pencaer was 
obviously the Pencaer promontory ; the commot of 
Pebidioc must, therefore, have been the north-eastern 
part of what is now the Hundred of Dewisland. The 
question is whether the lordship comprised the Cantred 
of Pebidiauk or mereh' the commot of that name. Now 
the Black Book of St. Davids shows that the bishop held 
a substantial extent of land in the Pencaer promontory, 
and at the present time chief rents are claimed by the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners or their assignees, on a 
number of farms in the Pencaer district, including the 
farms of Caerlem, Llanwnwr, Trehowell, and Penys- 
gwern, and it may also be well to put on record that the 
farms above specified formed part of the bishop's manor 
of Trellys near St. Nicholas. This goes to bear out 
George Owen's statement that the lordship comprised the 
Hundred of Pebydiauk, but so far as can be judged by 
the Black Book of St. Davids, it is certain that he did 
not possess anything like the whole of the land in that 
lordship in 1326. 

How then did the bishop lose such a considerable 
portion of the land in his lordship ? It seems very prob- 
able that much of it was lost during the episcopacy in 
1099 — 1115 of Bishop Griffith. He presided over the 
see during a very critical period. His possessions in 
Pembrokeshire were hemmed in by the Norman invaders. 
The lordship of Pebydiauk had been ravaged in the 
time of his predecessor in 1097 by Gerald de Windsor. 
The pressure was no doubt continued, if not increased, 
when he was elevated to the see, and in the end Bishop 
Griffith was either persuaded or intimidated into grant- 
ing a considerable portion of his possessions in Pebydiauk 
as well as in other districts to the grasping Normans. 
Llanrhian in Dewisland, Cenarth .Mawr in Emlyn, and 
I^awrenny and Ucceton (Upton) in Pembrokeshire are 
especially mentioned as having been alienated. 

Bishop David Fitzgerald was another dilapidator of 



76 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

the episcopal possessions, who (according to his nephew 
Giraldus Cambrensis) impoverished the see with more 
modesty than some of those wlio went before or came 
after him, and judging by the poverty of the bishoprick, 
there must have been other bishops who were equally 
generous with the estate of the Church. These early 
benefactions to the laity and others were no doubt 
accountable for the decrease of the bishop's possessions 
in Dewisland as revealed by the Black Book of St. Davids. 
It has been previously pointed out that the tenants of 
the lordship of Pebydiauk held their land either by 
copyhold or by deeds which had-probably to be entered 
on the court roll of the lordship. Yet practically all 
land in the Hundred of Dewisland is now conveyed as 
freehold. Leet courts for the manor of the City of St. 
Davids and for the manor of St. Davids have in modern 
days been more or less regularly held until the year 1916, 
and at such courts presentments were solemnly made of 
any transfers of realty in those manors, and instructions 
given for the collection of fines for such alienations, but 
these fines were practically uncollectable, and the whole 
procedure of the court leets were a farce. How then 
was the change in the tenure of the land in these manors 
effected ? There is no record of the conversion of these 
copyholds into freeholds, so far as the writer of this 
article had discovered, and the only conclusion which 
can be suggested is that there was neglect on the part 
of the bishop's officers in days long since elapsed. Prob- 
ably after Bishop Barlow relinquished his residence in 
the palace at St. Davids, the manor courts were allowed 
to lapse, with the result that land-owners all began to 
transfer their holdings by a deed of bargain and sale, 
followed by a release, which was the ordinary method of 
conveying freehold property at the time, and this pro- 
cedure gradually led to the land being considered as 
freehold. It will thus be seen that the tenants of the 
lordship of Pebydiauk succeeded in converting their 
copyhold land into freehold without the aid of an Act 
of Parliament. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 77 

Another possible factor in the change was the creation 
by the bishop of mesne or sub-manors. This system, 
as previously pointed out, was also adopted by the Nor- 
man lords in Pembrokeshire, but the number of such 
manors existing in 1588 in Dewisland, far exceeded the 
number created in the other hundreds in the county. 
According to a list compiled in that year by George Owen, 
the Elizabethan historian, there were in all 58 manors 
in Dewisland, as against 22 in Castlemartin and 21 in 
Roose. At that date 35 of these manors in Dewisland 
had come into the possession of lay persons, and the MS. 
reveals that prior to 1588 changes in the manorial system 
in Dewisland had already taken place. Thus it is recorded 
that the manors of Brawdy, Pointzcastle, and Newgale 
{Nova Villa), which in times past had been separate 
manors, had been amalgamated into one manor, and one 
court was then held for the three manors. 

Amalgamation was also going on amongst the manors 
of lay persons. We find that John ap Rees of Rickard- 
ston, in the parish of Brawdy, a descendant of Sir Rees 
ap Thomas, K.G., had united the manors of Gwrid Mawr, 
Gwrid B3^chan, Mynith Gwin, and Trewylin, but it is 
more important to observe that there was already a 
tendency to abandon the holding of manorial courts. 
Thus Thomas Johnes had discontinued the courts of the 
small manor of Trevinart near St. Davids ; the lord of 
the manor of Tressyssylt in the parish of Granston had 
followed his example, and John Wogan had given up 
holding courts for the west part of the town of Stang- 
naveth (Llangloffan in the parish of Granston), but 
continued those for the other part of the borough. The 
amalgamation and abandonment of manorial courts was 
no doubt due to the fact that the expenses of such courts 
exceeded the fees received from holding the same. Later 
on other lords of mesne manors followed suit, and prob- 
ably the abolition of the feudal duties in 1660 sounded the 
death knell of most of the manorial courts in Dewisland. 

In connection with Pembrokeshire manors it is interest- 



yS Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

ing to note that in Elizabethan and Stuart times there 
was more than one property held of the king's manor of 
East Greenwich, co. Kent. For instance the Post Mortem 
Inquisition held on the death of Rowland Walter of Roch 
in 1622, shows that he owned a house and 6 acres of land 
in Drewston, in the parish of Nolton, and also a yearly 
rent of 4s. issuing out of a messuage in Treglemes in the 
parish of Llanhowell, held of the king's manor of East 
Greenwich. There are other examples which might be 
mentioned. The practice seems to have been that in the 
event of any unconsidered trifles in the way of real 
estate falling to the crown by way of escheat or otherwise, 
and of there being no crown manor in the neighbourhood, 
the property so accruing to the king was united to his 
manor of East Greenwich. Pembrokeshire was not unique 
in this as the advowson of Presteign co. Radnor, which 
in 1568 was owned by John Bradshaw of St. Dogmael's 
Abbey, was held of the manor of East Greenwich, and 
Devonshire lands in the parish of Ashbrittle were also 
held of the same manor. 

There appear to have been no very large estates in the 
lordship of Pebydiauk, but there are many traces of the 
old communal system of tenure still in existence, es- 
pecially in the parish of St. Davids. These are found in the 
extraordinary intermixture of land in farms in that parish. 

Land of different owners lying in a field without any 
division between the different parcels are a common 
occurrence, and in one case, which came under the 
writer's notice a few years ago, land of one owner lay in 
the centre of his neighbour's land without any means 
of access to it. This curious intermixture of land is no 
doubt the result of a final division of land held under the 
Gwele system on the disappearance of that tenure, and 
it is more than probable that the legal phrase defining 
a small piece of land as a ' parcel of land ' arose from the 
conveyance of the bits of old tribal lands. 

The owners of intermixed lands at an early date realised 
the inconvenience of their dispersed properties, and 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 79 

gradually began to consolidate their holdings by purchase 
from or by exchange with their neighbours. These 
purchases or exchanges in order to be legal required a 
proper conveyance, but there is good reason to believe 
that in many of such exchanges, deeds were not always 
executed, and that the parties to the transaction con- 
tented themselves with merely taking over and working 
the respective lands so exchanged. An instance of this 
came under the writer's notice some years ago, in which old 
plans showed that an exchange must have been made, but 
neither part}'' had any document relating to such exchange. 

But the prevalence of intermixed land was not limited 
to Dewisland. The same condition was also to be found 
in North Wales and in Shropshire and Herefordshire, as 
late as the 17th century. In Cardiganshire, and indeed 
in most parts of Wales in the first part of the 15th century, 
there were few really large estates, except those of the 
monastic houses and the bishop of St. Davids. It was 
after that date when the formation of important estates 
commenced in West Wales by the purchase of adjoining 
lands, a process which continued until a few years ago, 
when the current reversed, and large landowners com- 
menced to sell their properties. 

When looking backwards into the past, one naturally 
wonders as to the kind of houses in which our ancestors 
lived. It seems pretty certain that available materials 
were the chief governing factors in the erection of their 
houses, as indeed they are at the present day. As above 
indicated, houses built of stone or bricks and mortar were 
non-existent in Pembrokeshire between the departure 
of the Romans and the advent of the Normans, and so 
far as the poorer inhabitants were concerned, the same 
position existed for some centuries afterwards. Where 
timber was procurable, as in the south part of the county, 
the houses were most probably built of wood, where 
stones were available the walls may have been built of 
stone with clay used as a substitute for mortar, while 
jn the north-west part of the county, furze interwoven 



8o Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 

between stakes may have formed the walls of the dwell- 
ings. 

Another method of building was the Clom houses, 
the walls of which were constructed of clay mixed with 
straw. Clom is the equivalent of the Danish Klam or 
the German Klamm, which means a sticky substance, 
and this suggests that this kind of construction was 
introduced either b}" the Flemish or the Norse settlers in 
the county. In most cases the roofs were probably 
thatched with rushes or straw, but in districts where thin 
flags or slates were obtainable, these materials may have 
been utilized as a covering for the houses. 

In picturing the homes of the early inhabitants of 
Pembrokeshire, we must, even in respect of those of the 
wealthier portion of the community, adopt a system of 
considerable reduction when comparing them with dwell- 
ings of modern times. The houses of the leading families 
in the county, with the exception of the Norman castles 
and the residences of the bishop, even up to the middle of 
the 14th century, were considerably smaller and infinitely 
more uncomfortable than the present day houses of well- 
to-do persons, and naturally the dwellings of the poorer 
persons were much smaller still, and entirely devoid of 
what are now considered almost necessities. People 
packed in much closer then than in the 20th century, 
and there were no sanitary inspectors to interfere with 
a householder who had a large family. 

In early days the windows of even the wealthy were 
either open to the weather, or glazed with horn 
or oiled paper. Glass when obtainable was an expensive 
luxury even for the rich, and at a much later date was 
almost beyond the means of the inhabitant of a cottage. 
This probably accounts for the tiny window apertures 
which are still sometimes to be seen in the ruins of ancient 
cottages. Under such circumstances it is easy to realize 
that the cottages must have been extremely cold in 
winter, and this no doubt accounted for the diminutive 
size of the windows, and also the practice of dividing 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 8i 

the door in half. This was formerly a very common 
practice in Dewisland, and had two advantages, as it 
enabled the occupant of the cottage to close the lower 
half of the door, and thus keep out pigs and other animals, 
while the upper half of the door could be kept open to 
admit light and much needed fresh air into the dwelling. 
The writer has often wondered whether the old Welsh 
cupboard bedsteads were not a relic of the days when 
cottages devoid of window panes must have been ex- 
tremely draughty, as in this style of bedstead the occu- 
pant was able to shut himself up in the bedstead by sliding 
the doors and thus exclude the chill winds. 

It will now be interesting to see what scale of wages 
was paid in Pembrokeshire in olden days. Some interest- 
ing light on this subject is found among the records of 
St. Davids Cathedral. The MS. in question is a copy of 
the weekly accounts of payments made in the year 
1384-5, presumably by Hugh de Pickton, the supervisor 
of the fabric of the cathedral in that year. The original 
MS. has long since disappeared, but fortunately for 
posterity a copy of it has been preserved and bound up 
in a volume (now entitled Liher Communis) containing 
the accounts of the common fund of the Upper Chapter 
of the Cathedral for a much later date. The account of 
Hugh de Pickton is in a MS. called Communicata, 
which is here used to mean entries or stated account 
relating to the common fund of the Upper Chapter, the 
upkeep of the fabric, as is shown by the statutes, having 
been a first charge on the common fund of that Chapter. 

This account has been previously published in Jones 
and Freeman's History of St. Davids Cathedral, but as it 
was published in Latin with contractions intelligible 
only to experts, and a few errors have occurred in the 
edition printed in that work, and the contents are par- 
ticularly interesting on account of its local lights, an 
English translation of it with notes by the writer is given 
below for the benefit of the general public. In the docu- 
ment several difficulties confronted the translator. For 



82 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



instance several of the Latin words used in the MS. have 
different interpretations. Thus sera means either a lock, 
a bar, or a bolt, and in the text harra (a bar) is also used, 
and it is, therefore, necessary to rely on the context for 
the proper meaning of the word. Then there is matter 
illegible by wear or age, and obsolete measures are 
mentioned whose exact capacities have long since been 
forgotten. In the translation given below, words or 
letters enclosed in square brackets indicate suggestive 
or explanatory matter ; a dash indicates a blank in the 
original, and dots represent illegible matter. 



COMMUNICATA. 

[Me]morandum that on Friday before the feast of John ante [Por]tam 
Latinam,^ Hugh de Picton was sworn in as supervisor of the Fabric 
of the church of St Davids, Anno Domini 1385. 

Communicata, dated the second day^ after the said feast, namely the 
15th day of [May], for the preceding week : — s d 

David Bole for five days working in the quarry 

David Yrist for five days . . 

Jak. Coce^ for five days 

Jak. Skynner for three days 

Philip Rosse for a week 

Item. In the same week for iron for making ' wegges 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making the same and repair 

ing other tools^ 
Item. One man making and repairing the aforesaid tools 

for one day 

For two new irons for 

For one hatchet .... 

Item for making a bar* 

Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for fastening on a shovel' 

Total . . 92 



1 The feast of St. John ante Latinam was on 6 May. 

« Sic in MS. 

3 Probably a phonetic rendering for Cooke or Cock. 

* What appears to be a cross precedes the word ' wegges,' but it is 
almost illegible ; it may be a numeral. Wegges is probably intended 
for wedges. 

6 Instrumenta. 

* Barrae. 
' Schoul. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



83 



Communicata, dated 22 May, for the preceding week : — 

[David] Bole for four days . . 

[J]ohn Rowe for four days.. 

[J]avyn Coce for the same period. 

[J]ak. Skynner for four days 

[P]hilip Rosse for a week . . 

[WJilliam ap Phillip Vawrer for his truckle* for four days 

[Llewelyn] Siglo for mending a tool 

Total 



7 3 



Communicata, dated last day of May, for the preceding week : — 

[David] Bole for six days . . . . . . . . . . i 

[J]ohn Rowe for the same period.. .. .. .. i 

[J]avin Coce for the same period . . . . . . . . i 

[J ak] Skynner for the same period .. .. .. .. i 

for the week . . . . . . . . . . i 

[William ap] Phillip for one truckle* for 6 days . . . . 3 

for one truckle* for 4 days carrying . . . . 2 

Ll[ewelyn] Siglo for repairing divers tools 



The mason for making 



Total 



Communicata, dated 5 June, for the preceding week : — 



Item, two men, namely, David Yrist and Javin Coke for 
three days carrying coal^ from the house of the arch- 
deacon of Kermerdyn 

Total . . 



I 6 



1 Trocklo. It is impossible to say what kind of a vehicle this word 
represents. It was no doubt the vehicle known as a ' truckle ' in 
Pembrokeshire. This is indicated by the census of Pembrokeshire 
compiled by George Owen of Kemes in 1599, from the muster books, 
which classifies carts and truckles together, and shows that there 
were 60 carts and truckles in the parish of St. Davids at that date. 
On the other hand in Cardiganshire a truck would appear to have 
been a measure in weight. Thus in the rent roll of the property in 
Cardiganshire of the Earl of Essex in 1577, the rents of oats in the 
grange of Blaenaeron amounted to 36 trucks. 

^ Carbones, 



84 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Communicata, dated 12 June, for the preceding week : — £ s 6. 

John Rosse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

John Skynner for five days . . . . . . . . 13 

David Yrist for five days . . . . . . . . . . 13 

Javyn Coke for five days . . . . . . . . . . 13 

Thomas Draws for one day travelling^ . . . . . . ^^ 

William ap Phillip Vawrer for one truckle^ for five days 2 6 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for repairing tools . . . . i 

Item. For one Pyckard^ full of lime stones* . . . . 120 

WiUiam Kyley for the carriage of the same from Port- 

cleyes* to the churchyard . . . . . . . . 40 



Total* 



I 13 io\ 



Communicata, dated 19 June, for the preceding week : — 

Phillip Rosse . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 

John Skynner for four days with the Sabbath . . . . 12 

John Coke for the same period . . . . . . . . 12 

Thomas Draws for the same period . . . . . . 12 

Walter ap David for the same period . . . . . . 12 

William Vawrer for one truckle^ for the same period . . 23 

Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for repairing tools . . . . . . i 



Total . . 82 

Communicata, dated 26 June, for the preceding week : — 

.Phillip Rosse . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 

John Skynner for four days . . . . . . . . 10 

Thomas Draws for the same period . . . . . . . . 10 

Phillip Goch for the same period . . . . . . . . 10 

John Coke for the same period . . . . . . . . 10 

Gitto ap David Thomas for the same period working in . . 

the quarry, and for his truckle'^ . . . . . . 30 

WUHam Vawrer for one truckle^ for the same period . . 20 

Ll[ewellyn] Syglo for repairing tools . . . . . . 4 



Total . . 10 6 



1 Eundi. 

2 See note i, p. 83. 

3 A pickard was a boat of 15 tons or upwards used on the River 
Severn. It is mentioned in a statute of 34 and 35 Hen. VIII. See 
note 6, p. 86. 

* Lapidibus calcinis, literally chalk stones, but no doubt in this 
case, lime stones. 

5 The harbour now known as Porthclais, about a mile from the 
cathedral. 

« This total is as given in the original, but is erroneous. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



85 



Communicata, dated 3 July, for the preceding week : 
Phillip Rosse 

John Skynner for four days 
Thomas Draws for the same period 
Phillip Goch for the same period . 
John Coke for the same time 
Walter ap David for 1 J days 
William Vawrer for one truckle^ for i\ days 

Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making and one new sledge 

And to the same for repairing divers tools 
And for one pykard' of lime stones from Solvach 
And for the carriage of the same . . 
Item. Goch Delyn for 2 J days 

Total 
Communicata, dated 10 July for the preceding week : — 
William Sayrer for the week 
Rys ap Wild for the week . . 
Jo. Makmourch for five days 
Jev[an] Degan for the week 
Robert ap Morgan for the week 
Robert Sydes for five days 
Labourers : Phillip Rosse for the week 

Thomas Drawes for the week 

Phillip Coke for the week 

Goch Delyn for the week 

David Kyogyn for five days 

Phillip Coch for the week 

Javyn Bach for seven days 

David Bach for two days 
Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making nails* and mending tools 
William Vawrir for one truck for four days 
Item. David Yrist for making two canopies® of lime 

stones 

Item. For one flagon* of ale' for the men travelling to 
LynstuUe* 

Total 



I 13 

2 
2 
I 

2 
2 



1 See note i, p. 83. 

* Sleggo. 

3 See note 3, p. 84, also note 6, p. 86. 

* Clavorum. 
^ Cibar. 

* Lagena. 

' Servisics. 

* LynstuUe has not been identified. 
Llanstinan. 



Possibly it may have been 



86 Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 

Communicata, dated 17 July, for the preceding week : — ^^ s d 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . , . , . . . 12 

Javjm Coke for six days . . . . . . . . . . 16 

David Bach for the same period . . . . . . . . 16 

William Vawrir for his truckle^ for the same period . . 3 o 

Item. Paid in the same week for 15 poles of timber for a 

scaffold and 15 ' Hoselstanes '^ from Ireland . . 3 9 

And for the carriage of the same from Porthglays' to 

the church of St Davids . . . . . . . . 2 

Item. In the same week riding to Tenbygh* for lead and 
iron to be bought for the use of the church of St. Da- 
vids ; for a horse hired for three days . . . . . . 10 

Expenses for horse and self at the same time . . . . 20 

Item in the same week, for making 12 ' flakes'^ for the 
scaffold 

Item, for the carriage of the same 

Item. For one ' cimba '* of lime stone 

Item. For the carriage of the same 

Item for making' the same 

Item. In the same week, for 29 pieces* 3 lbs. of iron 

bought at Tynby, the price of each piece being yjd. . . 183 

Besides for lead bought at the same place and time 

namely 33 peices,* 6 lb.. .. .. .. ..149 

Item. For coal' bought, 40 bushels^" at 2d. per bushel. . 6 8 

For carriage of the same from Portheleys^^ to the church- 
yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 

For making one p' ' bockets '^^ . . . . . . . . 2 



2 o 

1 o 

2 o 

4 o 

5 6 



Total . . 417 



1 See note i, p. 83. 

* The meaning of this word is obscure. 
5 See note 5, p. 84. 

* Tenby, about 30 miles from St. Davids by road. 

5 A ' fleak ' was probably a thin rope used for binding the poles of 
a scaffold. 

6 A cymba was a small boat of apparently much the same tonnage 
as a pickard ; at all events the load brought on this occasion cost the 
same as that brought by a pickard. See note 3, p. 84. Cywfca in Horace 
and Virgil was especially applied to the boat of Charon the mytho- 
logical ferryman over the Styx. 

' i.e., burning the limestones into lime. 

* Peicia. 

* Carbones. 
10 Busc'. 

" See note 5, p. 84. 

^* P'bockets. The meaning of this word is obscure. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



87 



Communicata, dated 24 July, for the preceding week : 

[Labourers] : John Makmurch for five days 

William Sayrir for the same period 
Moris Sudys for the same period . . 
Jevan Degan for the same period 
Robyn ap Moris 

Wylliam Stevene for the same period 
Ryse ap William for the same period 
Wylo Rugs for the same period 
Phillip Rosse for a week . . 
Jevyn Coke for the week . . 
David Bach for five days . . 
Howel Forth for four days 
Phillip Goch for the same period 
Goch Delyn for the same period . . 
Alys Arthur for the same period . . 
Jevan ap End . . . for one truckle^ 
. . . days 

Item. For one truckle^ for i\ days 

Ll[ewellyn] Syglo for making nails and repairing tool . . 

Item. The same week. For 14 poles of timber bought 
from William Vysear of Kermerdyn . . 

Item. For the carriage of the same from Portheleys^ to 
the church 

Total . . 



I 10 


I 10 


I lO 


I 10 


I 10 


I 10 


I 10 


I 10 


12 


12 


I 3 


10 


10 


10 


10 



for 



I 3 
9 

[I 8] 



I 18 o 



Communicata, dated the last day of July, for the preceding week : — 



Masons : John Makmurth for five days. . 

Willam Sayrir for the same period . . 
Robyn Sudys for the same period 
Jevan Degan for the same period . . 
Robyn ap Moris for the same period 
Wylliam Selone for the same period 
Rys ap Wyld for the same period 

Labourers : PhilUp Rose for the week . . 
Javyn Coke for the week 
David Bach for four days . . 
Howell Forth for the same period 
Goch Delyn for the same period 
Elys Arthur for the same period 
Thomas Drawys for the same period 



1 See note i, p. 83. 



2 See note 5, p. 84. 



88 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



Labourers [continued.) £ s d 

Roger Seys for two days . . . . . . 6 

Robert Caxon for two days . . . . . . 6 

Reydner Soket for one day . . . . . . 3 

Goch Morydych for one day . . . . 3 

Jevan ap Owen for one truckle^ for four days . . . . 20 

David for one truckle^ for the same period . . 20 

Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for repairing tools and making nails for 
the scaffold 



Total^ 

Communicata, dated 7 August, for the preceding week 
Masons : John Makmonyrch, for the week 
Wylliam Sayrir for the week 
Rys ap Wylliam for the week 
Robyn ap Moris for the week 
Wylliam Stephen for the week 
Robin Sudys for the week 
Jevan Degan for the week 
Labourers : Phillip Rosse for the week 

Javyn Coke for the week 

Thomas Drawys for the week 

Howell Forth for the week 

Elys Arthur for the week 

Roger Seys for the week 

Robert Cayon 

Goch Morydych for the week 

Phillip Goch for the week 

Goch Delyn for the week 

Jevan for the week 

David Bach for the week 

Wylliam ap Phillip Vawr for his truckle^ for five days 

Jevan ap Owyn for one truckle^ for six days 

Item. One new sieve 

Item. To the masons for a fee ; namely ' Archage' for ale' 

Ll[ewelyn] S[yglo] for making nails* and mending tools 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

6 
o 
4 

4 
[2] 



Total . . I 19 



1 See note i, p. 83. 

* Sic in original, but it is erroneously added up. 

3 The meaning of ' archage ' is not clear. Area is the Latin equiva- 
lent for a chest or shrine, but probably in this case archage may have 
been a fee for ' turning an arch.' 

* Clavorum. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 89 

Communicata, dated 14 August, for the preceding week : — ;(] s d 

Masons : John Makmorth for the week . . . . . . 22 

Robyn ap Mo[ris] for the week . . . . . . 2 2 

Wylliam Sayrir for the week . . . . . . 2 2 

R . . . . Wylliam for the week . . . . . . 22 

Wylliam Stevens for .... days . . . . [8] 

Labourers : Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . 12 

Jevyn Kock for . . . . . . 12 

Goch Merideth for . . . . 12 

Jevan Duy for the same period . . . . 12 

David Bach for the same period . . . . 12 

Jevan ap Owyn for one truckle^ for four days . . . . 20 

Wylliam ap Phillip Vawr for one truckle^ for 4^ days . . 23 

Ll[ewelin] Syglo for mending tools . . . . . . 1 



Total .. 19 6 
Communicata, dated 21 August, for the preceding week : — 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 



Total . . 12 

Communicata, dated 28 August, for the preceding week : — 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . • 12 

Item. Expenses in the same week, of a horse sent to Ha- 
verford* and Pembroch for nails and other tools and for 
making hinges and hooks* . . . . . . . . 16 

Item. For a horse hired for three days on the same occasion i o 

Item. In the same week for the carriage of 29 pieces 
3 lbs of iron from Angle to Pembroch and for making 
the said hinges and hooks . . . . . . . . 6 



Total .. 42 
Communicata, dated 4 September, for the preceding week. 
Work within the Church : John Makmurch for the week, 

making carpets* in the chapel of St. Andrew* . . 22 

Jak. Hakkerfor the week .. .. .. .. .. 28 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 



Total 



1 See note i, p. 83. 

* St. Davids is 16 miles from Haverfordwest, and from the latter 
town to Pembroke via Canaston Bridge is 21 miles, but if the horse 
were ferried across the haven at Burton, the distance would be 9 miles 
from Haverfordwest. 

3 Hingges ei hocys. 

* Scamna. 

* The chapel of St. Andrew is the north transept through which 
the chapel of St. Thomas is now entered. 



90 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Communicata, dated 1 1 September, for the preceding week : — s d 

Within the Church. Jak Hakker for the week .. ., 28 

Phillip Rosser for the week . . 12 

Item in the same week. About hauling stones at Barn- 

dy,^ 4d. for ale^ . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 



Total .. 42 

Communicata, dated 18 September, for the preceding week : — 

Within the church : Jak. Hakker for the week . . . . 28 

John Mackmorth for the week . . 22 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . 12 

Item. The same week : About .... stones at Barndy^ . . 4 

For the carriage of four truckloads of sand to the church 3 



Total . . 67 

Communicata, dated 25 September, for the preceding week : 

Within the Church. Jak Hakker for the week . . . . 28 

John Makmorth for the week . . 22 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . 12 

Item. In the same week. Jevan ap Owyn for the carriage 

of two truckle-loads of stone from Karvey' . . . . 2 

Item. The same week. John Arthur for one truckle for 
2^ days carrying stones from Karvey and from the 
quarry near St Davids to the church . . . . . . 13 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making four hooks* for the 
doors of the dwellings^ of the clergy, made from old 
iron from the stock of the church . . . . . . 4 

To one man for blowing for the same* . . . . . . i 



Total . . 7 10 

Communicata, dated 2 October, for the preceding week : — 

Within the Church : Jak Hakker for the week . . . . 28 

John Makmorth for two days . . 8 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . , 12 



1 Possibly Brawdy. 

* ServisicB. 

3 Now known as Caerfai which is half a mile from the cathedral 
close. 

* Hookys. 
6 Loggis. 

* i.e., blowing the smith's bellows. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Item. In the same week. For three quarters^ of iron 

bought at Ramsey" 

For the carriage of the same to the church 
Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for mending the tools of the said 

Jak Hakker, during five weeks . . 
Item. John Arthur for one truckle' for two days 

Total . . 



91 



£ s 


d 


14 


6 




6 




4 


I 





I 


10 



Communicata, dated 9 October, for the preceding week : — 

Within the Church . John Makmorth for the week . . 22 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . 12 

John Arthur for one truckle for the 

week, carrying from the said quarry to the wall* . . 30 

Total . . 64 



Communicata, dated 16 October, for the preceding week : — 

John Makmourth for the week . . . . . . . . 22 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 

John Arthur for one truckle for three days carrying from 

the said quarry to the wall . . . . . . 16 

Item. For making two doors for the chambers of the 

clergy, John Owyn and Buelth . . . . . . . . 16 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making four hinges and nails 

for the said doors . . . . . . . . . . 6 

And two men labouring . . . . . . . . . . 2 

Item. John Hakker in part payment of one ^ . . 6 8 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for mending tools . . . . i 

Item. David Hew for 200 flags stones* . . . . . . 20 

Item. Henry Fisher for 40 planks' . . . . . . i 10 o 

For carriage of the same . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Total ..269 



1 Quariilibus. 

' Ramsey Island is off the west coast of Pembrokeshire, and was 
formerly owned by the bishop of St. Davids, but it is difi&cult to see 
how supplies of iron would be available there. 

3 See note i, p. 83. 

* The wall surrounding the cathedral close. 

^ A blank occurs here followed by the word ' cept.' 

• Lapid tabulent'. 
' Rostris. 



92 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Communicata, dated 23 October, for the preceding week : — £ s d 

John Makmorth for the week . , . . . . . . 22 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 

Item. In the same week. Jevan Goch and David Cappan 

for one ' pikard '^ of lime stone'*. . . . . . . . 20 

Item in the same week. Expenses of self and horse rid- 
ing to Haverford and Pembroch on divers affairs of 
the Church, 3 days . . . . . . . . . . 16 

And hire of horse for the same time . . . . . . 10 

Item. For the carriage of lead and rosin from Angle^ to 

Pembroke on the same date . . . . . . . . 10 

Item. For two new locks* with keys^ for the said doors i 4 

Item in the same week. For two new rings with knockers* 

for the said doors . . . . . . . . . . 4 



Total . . I 10 4 

Communicata, dated 30 October, for the preceding week : — 

John Hakker in part payment of his account,' namely 

for ' . . . . cristynk de leggs clericorum solidi '* . . 6 8 

John Makmorth for work in the same week . . . . 22 

Phillip Rosse for the week.. .. .. .. .. [12] 

Item in the same week. Robin Hoper for the carriage of 

stones from Karvey* to the church . . . . . . 10 

Item in the same week. Four men working the windlas^" 

raising up the said stones for nine half days . . . . 6 

Item. For two flaggons^^ of ale^* consumed when about 

that work . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for repairing tools and two hinges 
and two hooks for the door of the 'croyste'^^ and 
making nails^* . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 

1 See note 3, p. 84. 

2 See note 4, p. 84. 

' Angle, about ten miles by road from Pembroke. 

* Seris. 

* Clavihus. 
^ Clappis. 

' Taxa usually means a tax or church due. In the present connec- 
tion it is probably the equivalent of an account or bill. 

8 This sentence is intelligible, a portion of it being missing in the 
document. 

9 See note 3, p. 90. 

10 Wyneas. 

11 Lagena. 
1* ServisicB. 

13 Croyse means a pilgrim. The word here no doubt means the door 
by which the pilgrims entered the cathedral. 
1* Clavorum. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



Communicata, dated 30 October [continued.) 

Item. To the said Ll[ewelyn] for repairing a lock^ and a 
key'' for the said door 

Total . . 

Communicata, dated 6 November, for the preceding week :- 

Within the Church. John Makmurth for three days 
PhilUp Rosse for the week . . 



93 



s d 



12 3 



I I 

I 2 



Total . . 

Communicata, dated 13 November, for the preceding week 

Within the Church. To Christian, the glazier, for a week 
reparing the great South window, under an agreement 
made by Morgan ap Eynon 
John Makmorth for the week 
Javyn Bach for the week 
William ap Eynon for two days 
Phillip Rosse for the week 
Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for repairing tools 

Total' . . 

Communicata, dated 20 November, for the preceding week 

Christian, the glazier, for the week 

John Hakker in part payment of his bill. . 

leuan Bach for the week in the quarry 

William ap Eynon for a week in the same 

Phillip Rosse for a week 

Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making nails* and repairing locks^ 
of the Church broken by robbers 

For 10 lbs. of lime® for different requirements of the 
Church, bought at Haverford . . 

Item. Buelth for the reparation of the gates of the Trea- 
sury and for fitting a bolt and making two bars' to 
other doors in the Church, namely one day 



3 o 

3 4 

I 3 

I 3 

I 2 

I 4 
3 



Total 



1 Serri. 

2 Clavo. 

3 sic in original, but it is erroneously added up. 
* Clavorum. 

^ Serarum. 

® In the text the word Chalch is used. 

' Barrae. 



94 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Comniunicata, dated 27 November, for the preceding week : — j^ s d 
Christian, the glazier, for the week . . , . . . 30 

John Hakker, in part [payment] of his bill^ . , . . 3 4 

Jak Lokyer for the week, making new locks with keys for 

the chancel* .. .. .. .. .. .. 150 

Item. For a horse hired to go the Haverford for tools^ of 
the said Jak Lokyer, and the expenses of a boy with the 
said horse . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Item. For i\ pieces* of iron namely , bought for 

making keys . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Item. Two masons for walling up* divers windows of 
the Church on account of the danger of robbers, and 
divers doors, namely in the aisles of the Church : — Ro- 
bert Sydys for a week . . . . . , . . . . 22 

Jevan Degan for a week . . . . . . . . . . 22 

Walter Sud5^s for a week, attending [on the mason] . . 16 

Phillip Rosse for a week , . . . , . . . . . 12 

Javyn Bach for a week . . . . . . . . . . 13 

WilUam ap Eynon for a week . . . . . . . . 13 

David Jon Yrys for the week . . . . . . . . 13 

For the carriage of four truckle loads of sand for the said 

work . . . . . . . . . . , . . . 4 

Item. Robin Hoper for the carriage of one ' pikard ' full 

of lime stones from Portheleys* to the churchyard . . 40 

Item. Jak Hakker for making a neck band' for the use 

of the fabric . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 

Item. In the same week. For two flaggons of ale con- 
sumed when drawing the said stones at Karvey . . 4 
Item. Goch Delyn for one day hauling at Karvey^ on 

the same date . . . . . . . . . . . . 2J 

For two keys for the locks of the said Church . . . . 3 

Total . . I 19 6j 

Communicata, dated 4 December, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 



1 See note 7, p. 92. 

2 Capam. 

3 Instrumenta. 

* Peicia. 

^ Obstruentibus . 

* See note 5, p. 84. 
' Col. trochi. 

8 See note 3, p. 90. 



Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 95 

Cammunicata, dated 4 December [continued.) £ s 6. 

Item in the same week. To Stephen Rhyn, David ap 

Marres, and Robin ap Walter for the carriage of three 

cart-loads^ of fire-wood from Porstyly* . . . . 20 

Item. William ap Eynon, cutting up the same wood for 

one day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 

Item. For William in bread and ale consumed when about 

the firewood on the same date . . . . . . 4J 

Item. To John Coker for six long boards^ for making the 

north door of the Church . . . . . . . . ^2 



Total . . 9 II i 

Communicata, dated 1 1 December, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week , . . . . . 3 o 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . , 12 

Item. John Tokyr for making two iron bars* for the 

round window in the chancel of the Church® . . . . 6 

Item in the same week. Robyn Hoper for the carriage of 

stones from Karvey® to the Church, 2^ days . . . . i oj 

Item. For 20 squared logs of wood' bought from Master 

John, the carpenter, at the price of gd. each, total . . 150 

For the carriage of the same from Portheleys,* namely 

3 cart-loads' . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 

For carriage of the same from the house of the said John 

to the Church . . . . . . . . . . , . 2 



Total . . I I 4i 

Communicata, dated 18 December, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Jak Hakker for part of his bill^** 6 8 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 

Phillip Brown, working for one day in the quarry of Kar- 

vay* 2i 

1 Carucata. 

2 i.e., Priskilly in Mathry parish, about eleven miles from St. 
Davids. 

3 Burdis, 

* Barrae. 

5 There is now no trace of a round window in the Presbytery. The 
only indications of circular windows in the Cathedral are in the west 
end of the nave. 

6 See note 3, p. 90. 
'' Lignis quadratis. 

* See note 5, p. 84. 

* Carrectis. 

" See note 7, p. 92. 



96 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



Communicata, dated i8 December {continued.) 

Item. For drink^ consumed on the same date, because 

there were 8 men working on that date 
Item. Master John, the carpenter, for three weeks, ma- 
king doors for the Church, receiving 4s. per week 
Item. Buelth for three weeks, receiving per week 2s. 6d., 

total 

for four weeks, receiving 2s. 6d. per week, total. . 

Item. Jenkyn Oweyn about the same date, for one week 

and four days 
Master John for two weeks and four days about 

the same date, receiving per week is. 6d., total 
Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making nails for two days for 

the same doors 

Item. Two men working with him about that . . 

Item. For drink for the aforesaid men on the said days 

in the forge 



7 
10 



Totar . . 
Communicata, dated 25 December, for the preceding week 

Christian, the glazier, for the week 

John Hakker for one day, making two holes for the bars' 
at the door ' 9 ducens aq . . . '* 

Phillip Rosse for a week 

Jak Lokyer for making four hinges for the north door of 
the Church, with keys belonging to them 

Item. One man working for three days . . 

Item. For burning charcoal^ bought in the same week 
for the use of the Church 

Item, for the carriage of the same . . 

Item. Jak Hakker for for a week stones at 

Karvey® for the use of the Church his agree- 
ment 

Item. Jak Hakker for a new key and for repairing the 
lock at the door of the chapel of St. Mary' 

Item. David Yryst on the vigils of the birth of our Lord 
for one day the Church, because Rosse was oc- 
cupied elsewhere 



6 2 



Total 



I II 5h 



1 Potus. 

2 Sic in original, but it is erroneously added up. 

3 Barrae. 

* See note 8, p. 92. 

5 Carbonum. 

6 See note 3, p. 90. 

' This is the chapel now known as the Lady Chapel. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 97 

Communicata, dated i January, for the preceding week : — £ s d 

Bartholomew for i J days working about the same doors 7 J 

Item. Buelth for the same time, about the same [doors] 7^ 
Item. John Oweyn for .'the same time, about the same 

work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7I 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . 12 



Total . . 3 oj 

Communicata, dated 8 January, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Item. Bar[tholomew] for the week, about the said doors 2 G 

Item. Buelth for the week, about the same [doors] . . 26 

John Owen for the week, about the same. . . . . . 26 

Jak Hakker for repairing the other door before the altar 

of St. Thomas,^ one day . . . . . . . . 6 

Item. For two pieces 3 lbs of Spanish iron bought from 
Jevan ap Phillip for two bars^ made for the door be- 
fore the altar of St Nicholas' . . . . . , . . i 10 

Item. Henry Smith of Vistobeston* for making the afore- 
said [bars] . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Item. David Yryst for working with him one day . . 3 

Item. For drink at that time in the forge . . . . 2 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making nails for half a day for 

the said doors . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 

Item. For drink at that time . . . . . . , . i 

Item. For hauling stones from Karvay® for the use of the 

Church, namely, labourers of the bishop, for drink . . 2 

Item Robyn Hoper for the carriage of the same [stones] . . 

at that time, namely, two truckle-loads . . . . 2 



Total . . 149 

Com.municata, dated 15 January, for the preceding week : — ;^ s d 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making keys for the said doors 

one day . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 

Item. David Yryst working with him on the same day 

for one day . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 

1 The chapel of St. Thomas is on the north side of the Cathedral. 

* Vectibus. 

3 The chapel of St. Nicholas (known also as the Wogan Chapel) 
lies on the north of Bishop Vaughan's chapel. 

* Probably it should be read ' Henry, the smith, of Scoveston,' 
in the parish of Llanstadwell. 

s See note 3, p. 90. 

G 



98 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Communicata, dated 15 January (continued.) £ s 6. 

Item. For drink at that time . . . . . . . . i 

Item in the same week, hauling stones at Karvey,^ in 

drink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 

Robyn Hoper for the carriage of four truckle-loads of 

stones . . . . . . . . . . , . . . 3 



Total . . 57 
Communicata, dated 22 January, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

John Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 

John Oweyn for one day, . . . timber at Poskily^ for 

making a gate in the ramparts' . . . . . . 6 

Item. David ap Ridderch for the carriage of the same . . 8 

Item. For bread and ale* for them at that time . . 3 



Total .. [5 73 

Communicata, dated 29 January, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Jak Hakker for one day, searching for stones at Karvey^ 
for the use of the Church, in addition to his contract 
for an increased bill* . . . . . . . . . . 6 

Item. Robin Hoper for the carriage of the said [stones] 

to the Church . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 



Total .. 4 II 

Communicata, dated 5 February, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 3 o 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

John Makmorth for the week, repairing the north part 

of the wall® . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 

John, the carpenter, for making gates for the wall . . 168 

John Hakker for part of his bill* for the dwellings' .. 13 4 
Item. To the same John for divers repairs in the Church, 

during I ^ days .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 

1 See note 3, p. 90. 

* See note 2, p. 95. 

3 The wall surrounding the cathedral close. 

* ServisicB. 

6 See note 7, p. 92. 
« Vallis. 
' Loggis. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 99 

Communicata, dated 5 February (continued.) ;{; s d 

Item. Bartholomew and Buelth in payment of money 

in arrear from the feast of the birth of Our Lord, by the 

order of Morgan ap Eynon . . . . . . . . 20 

Item. Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for making nails^ for the said 

gates for half a day . . . . . . . . . . 3 

Item. Drink at the same time . . . . . . . . 1 

Item. Robin Hoper for the carriage of lime and sand to 

the said gate, one day . . . . . . . . . . 6 



Total . . 293 

Communicata, dated 12 February, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosser for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Item in the same week. John, the carpenter, for a horse 

hired for riding to Tynby on the affairs of the Church i o 

Item. Expenses of himself and horse for three days . . 16 



Total . . 6 8 

Communicata, dated 19 February, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Item in the same week, Stephen Phillip, Robyn ap Wal- 
ter, [and] David ap Riderch for the carriage of three 
cartloads* of firewood for the church from Porskyly' 2 o 

Item. David Lloyd, cutting down [trees] for one day . . 3 

Item. Bread and ale* for them during the time . . . . 4I 

Item. For one piece* 9 lbs of iron for the bolts® of the 
gates of the wall, and the carriage of the same from 
Haverford . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Item. John Wyner for repairing a key for the door of the 

choir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 



Total .. 8 3| 
Communicata, dated 26 February, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Item in the same week. For one new bought . . 8 

1 Clavorum. 

* Carrectis. 

3 See note 2, p. 95. 

* Servisim. 
fi Peicia. 

8 Set as. 



100 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Communicata, dated 26 Febniary [continued.) ^ s d 

Item. For 200 nails, namely, board nails bought for the 

use of the Church . . . . . . . . . . 16 

Item. For five new irons bought for shovels^ the price 

of each being 3^d. i 5i 

Item. For one bought from Ll[ewelyn] Syglo for 

the use of the Church . . . . . . . . . . 60 



Totaf . . 13 7 J 
Communicata, dated 5 March, for the preceding week: — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . , . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . . . 12 



Total . . 42 

Communicata, dated 12 March, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 



Total 



Total . . 4 

Communicata, dated 19 March, for the preceding week : — 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 3 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . i 

Item. David ap Dean for one ' pickard ' of lime stones' 
and for the carriage of a bar and nails and one piece* 
of lead to the gates of the close, for the use of the 
Church . . . . . . . . . . ..12 

Item. William Wylde for making the said bars namely 8, 
and four hooks* with nails for the said gates, namely 
III, which weighed 18 pieces, 11^ lbs, lod. per 
piece, the total being . . . . . . . . . . 15 

And to the said William for repairing an axe® belonging 

to the Church 
Item. For the carriage of the said pieces* of lead with 
the said bars from Portheleys' to the Church 



1 Shouelis. 

2 Sic in original, but it is erroneously added up. 
2 See note 4, p. 84. 

* Peicia. 

* Hocys. 

* Securis. 

' See note 5, p. 84. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. lOi 

Communicata, dated 26 March, for the preceding week : — ;£ s d 

Christian, the glazier, for the week . . . . . . 30 

PhiUip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 



Total . . 42 

Communicata, dated 2 April, for the preceding week : — 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Jak Lokyer for making three locks with one key for the 
gates of the walls of the Close, and four ' pegous ' and 
four iron ' lopys '^ with four iron plates for the same 

gates 50 

Item. For drink at the same time during the work . . 2 

Item. To David, the smith, of Wyston for four new iron 
bars for the north door of the Church, of his own iron 
and weighing 4 pieces* 12 lbs for each piece 2s. 4d., the 
total being .. .. .. .. .. .. 114 

Item. To the said David for 27 great nails for the gates 

of the Close . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 

Item. For the carriage of the same from Wyston to the 

church of St Davids . . . . . . . . . . 6 

Item. To the said David for drink . . . . . . 2 

Item. Jak Lokyer for repairing the of the 

which is done 2 



Totar .. 19 II 

Communicata, dated 9 April, for the preceding week : — 

Phillip Rosse for the week . . . . . . . . 12 

Item. For parchment bought for this roll . . . . 6 

Item. To Hugh Felton for his fees for this year .. i 10 o 



Total . . Ill 8 

The sum total' of these six rolls of Communicata above 

(infra) ;^45 10 loi 

After reading the above account the reader will no 
doubt be struck by the curious names of the workmen 
mentioned. Bole is probably the equivalent of Ball, but 
Yrist is a name which the writer has never previously 



1 Possibly staples. 

2 Peicia. 

* Sic in original, but it is erroneously added up. 



102 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

come across. It is probably an error of the transcriber 
of the MS. Possibly the name was Yriet, attempted as 
the rendering of Wyrriot. Llewelyn Syglo is a curious 
combination. Perhaps S^'glo was a nick-name, equating 
Siglo shaking. 

Vawrer may have been an epithet relating to the size 
of the father of the workman, but it is interesting to note 
that there was a Jenkin Vawer, a shearman in Haverford- 
west, whose son William Vawer, a cardmaker and sheriff 
of Bristol in 1558, was the founder of Vawre's charity 
in Haverfordwest. 

It appears from the account that the wages of a common 
day labourer was 3d. per day, except in winter, when his 
pay was reduced to 2^d. per day. Masons were paid 
about 4|-d. per day in summer. ' Master John, the 
carpenter,' received 4s. per week, but he was no doubt 
a superior artizan, as other carpenters were paid only 
5d. a day, and the next highest wages paid to any of the 
workmen was received by Christian, the glazier, whose 
pay was 3s. a week. 

How these wages compared with those paid in England 
will be seen from the following entries : — In 1384 a mason 
in Elham^ was paid 6d. per day ; in 1385 a carpenter 
at Oxford received 6d. per day ; in 1399 a mason in 
London got 8d. per day, and a carpenter at Hornchurch, 
5d. per day, while in 1400 a carpenter in Radcliffe was 
paid 4d. per day. 

In considering all these rates of wages it must not be 
forgotten that money was worth very considerably more 
than in the present day, and that the cost of food was 
correspondingly low. Thus in 1384 at Southampton, 
lambs were 8d. each, pigs, 3s. each, and sheep is. id. 
each ; a goose cost 4d., a duck 2d., and a hen 2d. Un- 
fortunately there are no similar prices available for 
Pembrokeshire for this period. 

One of the striking items in the account is the charge 

1 In Kent. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 103 

for the hire of a horse and travelling expenses. Thus 
for the hire of a riding horse for three days to go from 
St. Davids to Tenby and back — a distance of 68 miles — 
was only is., while the expenses of the horse and rider 
for the three days was 2s. Nowadays the hire of a horse 
for that period would be at least £2 los. for three days. 

It must also be remembered that at that time wages 
in Dewisland were fixed in the lordship of Pebydiauck 
by the bishop of St. Davids as lord of the manor, and 
the scale in 1384 was regulated by a Statute of Bishop 
Adam Houghton on 15 July, 1380, which enacted that 
no common workman in the lordship of St. Davids, 
who did not support a household, should take more 
than 2d. a day with food, or 3d. per day without food. 
Master workmen were to be paid 4d. per day unless the 
lord should think that they deserved more. Teamsters^^ 
with their carts^ were to be paid 6d. only as from old 
they had been accustomed to receive, and no teamster 
was to be paid more than id. for drawing a full cart-load 
from Porthclais to the cathedral or to the city of St. 
Davids, and in the event of their not loading their carts 
full, they were to be mulcted of one day's pa3\ 

The Statute further provided that when a bushel of 
barley was commonly sold for 6d. in the market place 
in the city of St. Davids, the price of ale sold for com- 
pulsory work for the lord of the manor should not exceed 
id. (per gallon), and when the price of barley exceeded 
lod. per bushel but did not exceed i6d. per bushel, the 
price of ale sold for such work was not to exceed 2d. 
The Statute also enacted that bread was to be sold at 
a just price according to legal weight, and the price of 
corn, as by the law in England. 

Another clause in the same Statute provided that in 
view of the tricks of dealers in the city of St. Davids and 
also outside the city, no one should buy victuals in the 
city before the third hour of the day, or purchase such 

1 Quadrigarii. * Quadrigis. 



104 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

victuals on the way to the market. ^Moreover, no one 
was to prevent provisions from being brought to the 
market and exposed for sale, and when provisions were 
being sold, the bishop, canons, and vicars choral of the 
cathedral were to have the preference over all other 
buyers. Workmen were by the same Statute prohibited 
from going to reap for pay outside the lordship in harvest 
time, if work were available within the lordship, under 
a penalty of a fine and imprisonment. 

It will be observed that, while in modern times the 
tendency is to establish a minimum rate of wages, the 
practice in early days was to fix a maximum scale, and 
this principle was apparently in force in Devonshire in 
1656, for which year the following maximum wages were 
settled by the justices at the Quarter Sessions for that 
county : — 

No common men, servants of husbandry, above 16 years and under 
21, to be paid more than £1 per annum, and above 21 years of age £^ 
a year. 

No woman under 14 shall take any wages but meat, drink, and 
clothes, and above 14 until 18 years old, not above 26s. and her main- 
tenance, and above 18 years of age, 40s. 

Husbandry labourers from AU-Hallowstide until Candlemas not 
above 4d. per day with meat and drink, or lod. without diet ; and 
from Candlemas to AU-Hallowstide the rest of the year, 5d. with meat 
and drink, or iid. without food and drink, beating, rooting, hay and 
corn harvest excepted, and then not above is. without meat, etc., or 
6d. with meat, etc. 

Women for hay and corn harvest 3d. with meat, etc., or 6d. with- 
out meat, for hay, and yd. for corn. 

Master carpenter, master plaisterer, mason, joiner, plumber, hellier, 
thatcher, pavior, and every of them having servants or apprentices, 
and able to take charge of the work, yd. by the day with meat, etc., 
and i4d. without meat, etc. 

A pair of sawyers by the day with meat, etc., i2d., and without 
meat 2s. 4d. All spinsters in private families shall take not above 6d. 
with meat, etc., by the week, and 2s. without meat, etc., by the week. 

Interesting light on the state of affairs in St. Davids 
is afforded by the entries mentioning the robberies which 
were committed in the City of St. Davids in that period. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 105 

The sanctity of the cathedral did not protect it from 
violation by thieves, and a little previous to November 
1385 burglars appear to have broken the locks of 
the Church, and such was their audacity that the cathe- 
dral authorities were reduced to walling up divers win- 
dows in the church on account of the depredation of the 
thieves, and presumably also divers doors in the aisles 
of the church. Unfortunately there is no record as to 
what booty, if any, was secured by the robbers. 

The subsequent accounts in the Liher Communis give 
very little information as to the wages paid in years 
subsequent to the Communicata. In the account for 1490 
of Master William Warren, the Communarius of the 
Cathedral, we learn that Thomas Knight was paid 6s. 
for working stones, and Jenkin ap Thomas, Thomas Hay- 
ward, Thomas John, and William Leya, his associates, 
4d. per day, while John the plumber and his associates 
were paid lod. per day for two days repairing the aque- 
duct. In the account of the same Communarius for 
1492, Thomas Kneaght and his associates were paid 
2s. 6d. for three days for working at the pavement of 
the Cathedral, and Henry Wadyn and his mate were 
paid 4s. 2d. for working at the wall of the churchyard, 
being at the rate of 9d. for each day. After this date the 
writer had found no entries showing the wages in North- 
west Pembrokeshire until the year 1708. From that 
year the diary of Rees ap Rees of Penrallt Kibwr, in the 
parish of St. Dogmaels, yeoman, more or less covers 
the period down to 1734. In this diary the owner has 
jotted down the following memoranda of his hiring of 
workpeople on the undermentioned dates : — 

1708. Oct. 27. Agreed with Anne Edward for her son for a whole year 
for ' a pair of close and a lam'.' 

1708. Nov. 30. Agreed with Thomas Evan for a year for iis. and a 

lamb. 

1709. Nov. 14. Agreed with John David for his son till Hollandtide, 

1710, for 14s. 6d. 
171 1. Oct. 3. Agreed with Anne Thomas for her son for a year for 
14s. and a lamb. 



io6 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

1734. Oct. 5. Agreed with Joshua James for his son James for a year 

for 24s. 

1735. Oct. 21. Paid David John Parry for the following work: — 20 

days in harvest in 1737 at 4d. per day ; other work, 41 days 
at 3d. per day ; 8 days at 2d. per day. 

The accounts of Abel Hicks of Tremanhire in the parish 
of Whitchurch in Dewisland, supplies to some extent the 
information for a later period. It appears that he relied 
to a large extent on dutywork by his tenants, but an 
account with one of them named John Woolkock give 
some useful information as to the rate of wages paid. 
In 1754 Woolkock was paid 3d. for half a day mowing 
r^-e grass, 5s. 6d. for 16^ days in harvest, and lod. for 
five da^^s work after the harvest. In April, 1757, the 
same person was paid 7d. for 3|- days digging in the 
garden and filling carts. In 1792 Henry Hicks (son of 
Abel Hicks) rented a house and garden to Elizabeth 
Griffiths, who agreed to reap and bind during harvest 
for 3d. per day, and to make hay and weed at id. per 
day. Another tenant bound himself to reap at 4d. per 
day. It is probable that all the above rates were some- 
what under the current wages as the work was in part 
payment of the rent. 

A servants-book of John Evans of Trevayog Hall 
in the parish of St. Nicholas supplies information as 
to the wages paid in the period 1807 — 1845, from 
which the following items are extracted, the hirings 
being in each case for the whole year : — 

1807. Oct. 18. James Price, £^ 5s. 

1807. Oct. 21. Phoebe Harrie, £2 5s., one pound of wool, and a 

flannel apron. 
1807. Oct. 22. Martha Perry (head maid servant), £^, one pound of 

wool, and a flannel apron. 
1810. Oct. 18. James Price, £q los., two pounds of wool, and the 

haulage of a load of culm. 
1815. Oct. 19. James Banner, £g. 
1815. Oct. 24. Jemima Prosser, £^, one pound of wool, and a flannel 

apron. 
1825. Oct. 18. David John, £?,. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 107 

1825. Oct. 18. Margaret Jenkins, £^, one pound of wool, and a flannel 

apron. 
1830. Oct. 17. Dorothy Howell, £2 los., and one pound of wool. 
1839. Oct. 19. James Griffiths, £8 los. 
1845. Oct. 20. David Evans, £g los. 
1845. Oct. 12. Anne John, £2 15s. 

As to the apparel of our ancestors in early times we 
have little information. There is a rude sketch on the 
margin of a document in the Public Record Ofhce, 
depicting the scribe's idea of a Welshman, but it is quite 
possible that this may have been an imaginary sketch. 
It is, however, safe to conclude that in 1281 Welsh woollen 
frieze largely composed the dress of the ordinary in- 
habitant of Pembrokeshire, and in fact in all other parts 
of Wales. A grant in that year by King Edward I. 
to the bailiffs and burgesses of Hay in co. Brecon of tolls 
on goods brought into that town, indicates the importance 
of the cloth trade in Wales, as no fewer than five items 
relate to cloth. Thus on every horse-load of cloth sold 
the toll was ^d., on every entire cloth sold, ^d., on every 
truss of cloth brought by cart, 3d., and on every horse- 
load of cloth or divers other small article, -^d. 

Whether the cloth brought into Hay was of Welsh 
manufacture is not certain, and it is equally uncertain 
as to when woollen manufactures were commenced in 
Pembrokeshire, it has been stated that Flemings soon 
after their arrival in the county started this industry in 
Tenby, and tradition asserts that they had two woollen 
factories in Tenby, one on the Castle Hill and another 
in Chimney Park, but however this may have been, it 
is certain that in 1326 there was a fulling mill at Cil- 
gerran, and in 1325-6 there was a similar factory at 
Camrose, and later records mention numerous other 
fulling mills in different parts of the county. 

But while Welsh homespun may be regarded as the 
ordinary wear of the inhabitants of the principality, 
it is clear from the tolls mentioned in the grant above 
referred to, that an inclination for richer raiment has 
already set in, as among the items is a toll of ^d. on cloth 



io8 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



of silk ^Yith gold samite/ diaper and baudekyn,^and Jd. on 
silk without gold and on cendalum,^ while id. was charged 
on every hundred of linen web, canvas, and Irish cloth. 

From this date till the beginning of the reign of James 
I., there is little information available as to the apparel 
of the inhabitants of Pembrokeshire, but it is certain 
that among the wealthier classes luxury in raiment 
had steadily increased. The inventory of the goods of 
Sir John Perrot at Carew Castle made on 27 April, 1592, is 
disappointing, the only items of personal apparel men- 
tioned being two pairs of pantoufles^ and three pairs 
of pinsons^, their total value being 6s., the explanation 
of this no doubt being that the inventory is not complete. 

There were dandies at that period as in modern times, 
and in 1603 some of the fashionable swells were equally 
reluctant to pay their tailors' bills, with the result that 
they were sued in the Great Sessions, and these bills, 
being fortunately preserved, are now available for our 
information th^ee hundred years afterwards. 

The bills in question, which are interesting not only 
as showing the cost of materials, but also affording light 
on the materials worn at that period, and also on other 
commodities, are given below. The plaintiff in each case 
was Richard Bateman, a mercer in Haverfordwest, 
who sued in 1603 Hugh Owen of Orielton, esq., for £3 17s. 
for the following goods supplied about 8 Sept., 1603 : — 

Hugh Owens, late of Orielton, esq., the 8th dale of Sept., ;/] s d 

1603, oweth for 13 yards of barge* @ I4d. per yard . . 112 6 

2f yards of sack-cloth' @ i4d. per yard .. .. .. 3 4 

i^ yards of buckram @ i6d. per yard 

17 yards of whalebone 

One ounce of silke 

Two pair of whalebone sleeves 



' Silk stuff sometimes woven with gold or silver threads. 

2 Silk cloth. 

3 A silken cloth. 

* Slippers. 

* Thin soled shoes. 

^ Barege, a thin dress woollen stuff. 

' A mourning cloth. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



i^ yards of French greene sayes^ 

J [yard] of buckram, is., and thread, lod. 

Green nicle and thrid 

One yard of buckram 

I J yards of sackcloth 

2^ yards of jeine^ fustian 

9 yards of whalebone 

Coulerd' silke 2d., thrid 3d. 

5j yards of broad bayes* 





109 


£ 


s 


d 




3 


9 




I 


10 
3 




I 


4 




I 


9 




3 


I 




I 


6 




r 


3 




13 


I 



£3 17 



In the next case Gelly Laugharne of Pembroke, gent., 
was sued for £4 i8s. 46.. for the undermentioned goods 
supplied about the 22 Sept., 1603. Gelly Ivaugharne was 
the son of Thomas Laugharne, the brother of Francis 
Laugharne of St. Brides : — 

Gelly Laugharne of Pembrock, gent., the 22 Sept., 1603, ^ s d 
oweth unto Richard Baetman for yf yards of millian* 
fustian @ 3s. 4d. per yard . . 

Two dozen of purled lace 

Nine dozen green silk buttons . . 

10 skeynes of silke 

1 [yard] of russet fustian lod. and greene sayes 
3 yards of dowlas* 
3 yards of white jeyne fustian . . 
I J yards of canvas i5d. and thrid 6d. 
J [yard] of elbroad taffeta 
6 yards of lace id. and 4 skeynes of silk 
3|- yards of red cloth @ 2S. 6d. 

2 yards of cotton 

3 dozen of velvet lace 
One ounce of tobacco 
J oz. of spun silk 
A dozen heare collerd poynts' . . 
A pair of knives 2od., a lace id. 
i yard of cotton . . 
14I yards of lace 
Thread id., lace caddis* 3d. 

A 18 4 





I 5 10 




6 




3 




I 8 




I 6 




3 6 




3 6 




I 9 




I 10 




2 5 




8 10 




5 




120 




3 4 




I 




2 




I 9 




I 4 




I 10 




4 



1 A serge cloth. 

* Jean, a twilled cloth. 
^ Coloured. 

* Baize. 



5 ? Milan. 

^ Strong calico. 

' Laces for fastening hose, &c. 

* Cotton. 



no 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



The third case was against Alban Owen of Court in 
the parish of Eglwyswrw, gent., to recover £12 14s. 5d. 
for goods delivered before 11 Oct., 1603. Alban Owen 
was the son of George Owen, lord of Kernes, by his first 
wife Elizabeth the daughter of William Philipps of 
Picton Castle : — 

Mr. Alban Owens of the Court in the parish of Eglwyswrw £ s d 
oweth unto me Richard Batman the 16 day of Sept., 
1603, unpaid of ould by account . . . . . . ••745 

The 20th day of Sept., 1603, I sould and delivered to the 
said Mr. Alban Owens by the handes of his messengers 
with his letter f yard of black satten @ i8s. per yard . . 13 6 

The II Oct. 1603 I sould and delivered to the said Mr. Alban 
Owens by the handes of his messenger and servant Jenkin 
James with his letter, 7 yardes of sage coullour Kentish 
brodcloth @ los. 6d. per yard .. .. .. • • 3 I3 

A pair of fine wosted^ stockens . . . . . . . . 6 

A pair of fine silk garters . . . . . , . , . . 5 

2 doz. fine silk pointes @ 2s. per doz. , . . . . . 4 

6 pair of Kentish washed gloves @ i4d. per pair . . . . 7 



;£i2 14 5 

The fourth case was against William Warren of Tre- 
wern in the parish of Nevern, esq., for £6 15s. 3d. for 
goods delivered before 23 Dec, 1604. William Warren 
was the son of Mathias Warren of Trewern, by Elizabeth 
Catharne his wife : — 

Mr. William Warren of Trewerne esq. the i8th Aug. 1604 
oweth unto me Richard Batman for 4J stones of Spanish 

eyron^ @ i8d. per stone . . . . . . . . . . 10 6 

8 stones of good pitche @ i8d. per stone . . . . . . 12 o 

2 stones of black ocum^ @ 3d. per lb. . . . . . . 7 o 

18 Aug. 1604 2^ yards of brown hoUand @ 3s. per yard . . 7 ^ 

6 doz. of ash collar* silk buttons @ 5d. per doz. . . . . 26 

6 skeines of couUer silk @ 2d. per skeine . . . . . . 10 

2^ yards of black cotton @ lod. per yard . . . . . . 20 

Flex 6d., and 3 doz. blue silk buttons i2d. . . . . . . 16 

16 skeines of blue silk @ 2d. per skeine . . . . . . 28 



Worsted. 
Iron. 
Oakum. 
Coloured. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

6 yards of smale blue silk purled lace @ 3d. per yard 
2 doz. large blue close^ buttons 

25 Aug. 1604, 3 yards of watchet^ byndinge lace @ 4d. per 
yard 

2 yards of curie lace 3d. per yard and 2 skeines of couler 
silk 4d. . . 

i\ yards of galoone lace @ 3d. per yard 

21 Sept. 1604, 3^ yards of dowlas @ lyd. per yard 

3 doz. of watchet curie silk lace @ 4d. per yard 
A yard of watchet cuUourd elbrod' taffetta . . 
12 skeines of watchet silk @ 2d. per skeine . . 

18 Nov. 1604. By his son Thomas Warren with his letter, 
4 doz. of watchet cotillen* silke curie lace @ 4d. per yard 

12 skeines of couller silk @ 2d. per skeine and a yard of 
buckram i2d. . . 

A dozen of slyved* silk . . 

12 Dec. 1604. 2 brod black cupps 

23 Dec. 1604. 23 yards of watchet ribband . . 

6J yards of grene ribband 

9 doz. buttons 

8 skeines of silke 

5 yards of watchet silk lace 



III 

s d 

1 6 

2 2 



I 

3 
16 

15 
2 

16 

3 
I 

7 
2 

3 



ID 
O 

II 
O 
O 
O 



i(> 15 3 



In the above bills the measures are given in condensed 
modern form in place of the complicated verbiage in 
the originals, but the spelling in the MS. is retained. 

The charge of 3s. 4d. for one ounce of tobacco in the 
bill against Gelly Laugharne is particularly interesting, 
as it gives us the price of that commodity in 1603, just 
17 years after its first introduction into England in 1565 
by Sir John Hawkins. In 1586 Mr. Ralph Lane intro- 
duced the practice of smoking, and Paul Hentzner in 
recording his visit to the Bear Gardens in London in 
1589 stated that at these spectacles and everywhere else 
the English were constantly smoking tobacco. King 
James was a strong opponent to smoking, and in the 



1 Clothes. 

* Blue. 

8 An ell broad. 

* A black and white woollen fabric for ladies skirts. 
6 Split. 



112 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



very year in which Gelly Laugharne made his purchase 
of the weed, published his celebrated Counterblast to 
Tobacco, and in 1604 placed a duty of 6s. lod. per lb. 
on all tobacco sold. As tobacco by the entry above 
referred to was £2 13s. 4d. per lb. in 1603, it must, with 
the duty placed on it in 1604, have cost at least £3 os. 2d. 
per tb. in that 3^ear, and present day smokers of the weed 
have reason to congratulate themselves that they did 
not live in the reign of James I. 

Some ten years later we have a bill for ' wares delivered 
toward the funeral of George Owens, esq.' This George 
Owen was no doubt the lord of Kemes and the well- 
known Elizabethan historian of Pembrokeshire, who 
died on 26 Aug., 1613. The first item in the bill is dated 
25 Aug., 16 . . . The date of the year is illegible, but as 
the document is in a file of papers for the 12 Jac. I. 
(1614-15), there can be little doubt as to the identity of 
the deceased. If the goods were ordered on 25 Aug., 
the executor must have bought the goods in anticipation 
of the death, but possibly this date ma}^ have been an 
error of the shopkeeper. The items in the bill are as 
follows : — 



16. . Aug. 25. 13 yards of puke'^ @ 13s. per yard 

13 yards of puke @ iis. per yard 

if of puke @ los. per yard 

16 yards of grogram^ @ 2S. 2d. per yard 

9 yards of lyle^ grogram @ 2s. 2d. per yard 

3 yards of black ribbin @ 5d. per yard 

3^ yards of russet fustian @ I4d. per yard 

Black thread 6d., a skein of sUk 2d. . . 

A dozen of buttons 

13 yards of amitt* @ 2s. yd. per yard 

3 yards of russet fustian @ I4d. 
One yard of buckram . . 
7 yards of black ribbon @ 5d. per yard 

4 skeynes of silk 8d., a pastboard 4d. 



3 
17 

19 



13 
3 

I 
2 
I 



^ Puke was a material of a dark colour, said to be between black and russet. 

* A coarse fabric of silk or silk and mohair. 
3 Lisle. 

* Possibly Amice, a flowing garment ; probably material for the shroud. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 113 

i s d 
Thread . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 

4 yards of black ribbin @ 2d. per yard . . . . . . 8 

\ yard of tamitt^ . . . . . . . . . . . . i 3j 

Silk, 6s., in ink id. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 



£21 15 li 



In the wa}'- of household utensils, the writer has found 
no mention of crockery or earthenware having been 
used in Pembrokeshire in early days. Yet broth [cawl] 
was almost a national item of food and basins of some 
kind must have been required to hold it. There can be 
little doubt that bowls and plates of sycamore wood and 
spoons of the same material formed the dinner service 
for the consumption of broth and other liquid comestibles 
in the houses of all but the wealthier members of the 
community. The latter class had undoubtedly plates, 
dishes, basins, cups, tankards, spoons, and other articles 
made of pewter, while the ' millionaires ' of the period 
had more or less silver and silver gilt plate for domestic 
use. Cups of horn were also used, and the writer of this 
article recollects that in 1868, the outer kitchen at Treva- 
coon appropriated to the farm servants was supplied 
with wooden bowls and spoons for broth, etc., which 
with bacon, barley bread and oaten cakes, butter, milk, 
and cheese were the chief articles of diet in that kitchen. 
In the inner kitchen, appropriated to the houseservants, 
neat little horn tumblers were in daily use. 

The following is a list of all silver and pewter articles 
specifically mentioned in documents and in wills and 
inventories for probate purposes of the goods of Pem- 
brokeshire persons during the period 1551 — 1659, which 
have come under the writer's notice. It is interesting 
not only as throwing light on the conditions of social 
life, but also as indicating to some extend the financial 
circumstances of the owners. It must not, however, be 
concluded that the list comprises the whole of the plate 
and pewter in the count}', as it is only in comparatively 

^ Perhaps intended for tamine, a thin woollen or worsted stufi highly 
glazed. 

H 



114 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

iew instances that such articles are specifically mentioned 
in the wills of the period, and unfortunately a very large 
number of the inventories of the goods of the different 
testators, especially those of the highest social standing, 
have disappeared. In the list given below, the date of 
the will or document containing the information comes 
first, then the name and address of the owner, followed 
by the description of the plate or pewter, and when the 
information is derived from inventories, the value of 
such articles as assessed by the appraisors ; also notes on 
the owners : — 

1 55 1 Nov. II. John Phillipps of Picton [Castle]. A basyn and 
ewer, sylver and parcel gilt ; a standyng cupp, silver ; a goblet with 
a cover, parcell gilt ; a white standyng cupp, sylver ; two saultes with 
cover, gylte ; a salte with a cover, white ; therteen spones typped 
with Christ and the Apostells, parcell gilt ; two dosen of spones, 
white ; two crewses with covers for ale, doble gilte ; a crewse with a 
cover for ale, parcell gilte ; a pott, sylver parcell gilte ; a flatt pece 
with a cover, doble gilte ; foure white cuppes. John PhilUpps was 
the son of Sir Thomas Philhpps of Cilsant by Joan the daughter and 
coheiress of Sir Henry Dwnn of Picton Castle. 

1592 April 27. Sir John Perrott of Carew. Three jugges garnisht 
with silver, the covers loose, 26s. 8d. This plate is stated to have 
been newly found, and the bulk of the silver appears to have been 
included in a first certificate which is missing. Under the heading 
' Pewter of all Sortes ' are the following : — 6 chamber pottes of pewter 
3s. ; 3 candlestickes of tynne 3s. ; 4 present pottes, 13s. 4d. ; 6 flag- 
gons of Tynne los. ; 6 dozen of pewter platters and one odd one, at 
4d. ye lb., weying 309 lbs., £5 3s. ; 18 porringers weying 13 lbs., at 
4d. ye lb., 4s. 4d. ; one dozen and 8 sawcers weying 6 lbs. at 4d. ye 
lb. 2s. ; 4 old platters or chargers weying 27 lbs., 9s. ; certaine old 
pewter weying 28 lbs. at 3d. ye lb., 7s. ; 3 dozen and 6 dishes and 
plates of all sorts, weying 66 lbs. at 3d. ye lb., 22s. ; a dozen of savyer ; 
i^ dozen of frute dishes, 2 dozen of other dishes, 2 dozen of platters, 
and one odd one, 4 chargers and 4 pie plates, all being newe, and 
weying 162 lbs. at 4d., 58s. In addition to these the inventory men- 
tions the following articles as having been lent to George Deverox 
esq., for the funeral of Mr. Walter Deverox : — 4 chamber potts ; 18 
pewter platters ; 6 sawcers ; 4 white candlestickes ; 2 pewter beere 
pottes ; 28 plate trenchers. Sir John Perrot was M.P. for co. Pem- 
broke in 1563. He was Lord Deputy of Ireland, and is said to have 
had an income of over ;^20,ooo a year. He was born at Haroldston 
near Haverfordwe.st, but afterwards removed to Carew Castle, which 
had been granted to him by Queen Mary in 1554. {State Papers.) 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 115 

1581-2. John Vaughan of Narberth, gent. 12 silver spoons and a 
silver ale cup, bequeathed to his grandson John Nayshe. John 
Vaughan died, leaving three daughters, namely, Jane, who married 
John Elliott of Narberth, Mary, who married Richard Nash, and 
whose daughter Jonet was the wife of Alban Phillipps, the son of 
Morgan Phillipps of Picton Castle. The third daughter married John 
Re veil of Kilgerran. 

1594 Nov. 15. Elizabeth Loughor of Tenby. She bequeathed to 
her sister Anne Lloyd and her cousin Jane Lloyd and to Mr. Principall 
Harris, a gilt bowl each, and to Mrs. Younge and Mrs. Bathell, a 
lesser gilt bowl apiece. 

1599 July 9. David Symyns of the parish of Ambleston. 8 pewter 
dishes, 3s. ; 3 brazen candlesticks, 6s. ; 2 pewter candlesticks, is. 4d. ; 
2 mazer cuppes with silver hoops, 14s. ; 4 silver spoons, 6s. 8d. 

1599-1600 Feb. 18. Thomas Cooper of Martletwy. 6 best silver 
spoons and a silver salt cellar, gilt, bequeathed by him to his son 
John Cooper. Thomas Cooper was the son of Edward Cooper of 
Martletwy. He married Gwen (described in Sir Thomas Phillipps' 
Notes of Deeds at Picton Castle as Winifred), the daughter of Rice 
Huett, who after the death of her husband Thomas Cooper married 
Thomas Phillipps of Martletwy. Thomas Cooper describes himself 
as a cousin of Owen Phillipps of MoUeston. 

1603. Owen Phillipps of Molleston, gent. A basin and ewer of 
pewter, 3s. ; another basin 6d. ; a charger, is. ; 2 dozen pewter 
dishes, is. ; 2 chamber potts, is. ; 4 pewter candlesticks and one of 
copper, 4s. ; a white silver cup, 55s. ; a silver bowl, 45s. ; silver salt 
cellar and cover, 20s. ; 11 silver spoons, £;^. Owen Phillipps was the 
son of Morgan Phillipps of Picton Castle by his wife Elizabeth, the 
daughter of Richard Fletcher of Bangor, esq. 

1604 Oct. 16. William Johnes of Haverfordwest, alderman. One 
dozen ' Postel spoones ' and a gold ring, which he bequeathed to his 
son James Johnes. Testator's wife Joan in 1605 bequeathed to her 
niece Joan Rosser ' my silver spoones with the broad hedds and a 
silver goblet which I have remaynynge with Mr. William Walter of 
Roche in gage.' 

1606 June 24. John Hycke of Woodston in the parish of Steynton. 
Two ' brod pewter dishes and a brass chauldron.' 

1606 Dec. 4. Thomas Renish of the parish of Camrose. 8 silver 
spoons. 

1607-8 Jan. 10. Margaret Shipman alias Elliott of the parish of St. 
Florence, widow. Two little platters ; a broad dish and platter, and 
one pewter dish. 

1608-9 Mar. 17. Jenett Reade of Newton, in the parish of Rud- 
baxton, widow. Two coffers, 8 pewter dishes ; a canopy bed. 

1609-10 Mar. 4. William James Peeter of Llanrian. 16 pieces of 
pewter, and 3 candlesticks, 20s. ; a pewter salt cellar and 12 tin 
spoons, 2S. ; a corslett with a pike, 20s. 



Ii6 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

1611 May 12. Henry Nash of Haverfordwest, gent. 10 ' Postell 
spoons and one other spoone,' ^3 los. ; a ' cruze with a cover and 
foot, double gilt,' 30s. 

161 1 May 18. William Walter of the parish of St. ]\Iary, Haver- 
fordwest, alderman. A bell salte, gilte, a silver tonn, parcel gilt, a 
white silver wine cupp, and ' 6 spoones with Appostle hedds.' The 
will states that this silver was brought by his wife Alice Middleton 
to the testator on her marriage to him. This William Walter was 
the son of John Walter, the first of the family to come to Pembroke- 
shire, and the ancestor of the Walters of Roch Castle (see West Wales 
Hist. Records, Vol. V., p. 272). 

1611-12. George Owen of the parish of Llanvihangel Penbedw, 
clerk. Pewter dishes and a salt cellar, 13s. ; 6 silver spoones, 30s. 
He held the livings of Llanvihangel Penbedw and Whitechurch in 
Kemes, and was one of the first Pembrokeshire authors. He was the 
writer of The Genealogy of James I., the Well Spring of True Nobility, 
etc. 

1612 Jul. 25. Thomas Symyns of Martell, in the parish of Pon- 
cheston. A mazer cuppe with a silver hoope ; 6 pewter dishes and 2 
saltcellars, 6s. ; a silver salt [cellar], 20s. ; 6 silver spoones, 12s. ; a 
cup with a silver cover, 5s. He was the son of John Symyns of Martel 
by his wife Agnes, the daughter of WilUam ap Res of Martel. 

1614-15 Feb. 8. Miles Middleton of Pulcrochan, gent. 7 pewter 
dishes and candlesticks, 8s. ; a silver spoon, 4s. ; a brooch, is. ; 12 
wooden dishes and trenchers, 4d. ; a pair of quern stones, is. 8d. 

1616 Apr. 10. William Walter of Roch Castle, gent. Silver plate, 
;^6o. (See West Wales Historical Records, Vol. V., p. 274.) 

1616-17 Mar. 6. Thomas Mathias of Llwyngwarren, in the parish 
of Jordanston. 3 silver beer bowls, £j ; 12 silver spoons, £4. He 
was the son of Mathias ap Thomas, and married Ursula, the daughter 
of George Owen, lord of Kemes, by Elizabeth, daughter of William 
Phillipps of Picton. Ursula Mathias afterwards married William 
Laugharne, the son of Thom.as Laugharne, and grandson of Francis 
Laugharne of St. Brides. 

1617-18 Jan. 29. John Harryes of Foord, in the parish of Steynton. 
Silver saltcellar, parcel gilt, with a cover, 30s. ; 5 silver spoons, i6s. 
8d. ; a silver tureen, 20s. ; an old basin and ewer of pewter, 3s. 4d. ; 
pewter dishes, platters and saucers of several sorts, amounting to 
2 J dozens, 30s. ; 3 old candlesticks of pewter and an old saltcellar, 
6d. ; ' treene dishes and trenchers with one old pottle pewter pott, a 
pint and two pewter chamber potts,' 2s. 

1618-19 Jan. 29. Richard Hargest of St. Davids. A silver beaker 
bequeathed to his son Thomas Hargest. He was the son of Richard 
Hargest by his wife Mary, the daughter of Thomas Crane, subchanter 
of St. Davids Cathedral in 1556. 

1620 May 24. William Melchior of Newport. 21 pewter dishes, iis. 

1620 June 14. Arnold Butler of the parish of Martletwy, gent. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 117 

14 pewter dishes, 4s. ; saucers, 4s. ; candlesticks, 2 saltcellars, 2 pew- 
ter potts and pewter spoons, 13s. 4d. 

1623 April 18. Owen David, rector of Poncheston, clerk. A silver 
cup gilted. 

1624-5 Feb. Robert Bowen of the parish of St. Thomas, Haver- 
fordwest. A standing silver bowl, £2. ; a silver beaker, parcel gilt, 
26s. 8d. ; two double gilt bowls, £2 los. ; one double gilt silver salt- 
cellar, £2 ; a silver saltcellar, £1 6s. 8d. ; 16 silver spoons, £i. 

1628 May 20. William Risam of Tenby, merchant. 35 oz. of white 
silver plate ; a Spanish broad wine bowl of silver, double gilt, weigh- 
ing 25 1 oz. ; a cup with a cover of silver, double gilt, weighing q| oz. ; 
a silver beaker, parcell gilt, weighing 1 1 J oz. ; 2 broad silver wine bowls, 
parcel gilt, weighing 22 oz., bought from Bartholomew Hobes of Bristol. 

1644-5 Js-"- -6. David Lloyd of the parish of Morvil. A silver 
beaker, a double saltcellar single gilt, and 12 spoons. 

1645-6 Feb. 2. Grace Yong of Argoed, in the parish of Nevern, 
widow. A silver beaker, a silver saltcellar, and a brass chaldron. 

1650 Sept. 26. Lucy Meyrick of Pembroke. A silver wine bowl ; 
4 silver bowls, parcel gilt; a silver saltcellar, parcel gilt; 13 best 
silver spoons. 

1650 Dec. II. George Williams of Trearched, in the parish of Llan- 
rhian. 4 pewter dishes ; a saucer and 12 pewter spoons. 

1650 Dec. 25. Reece Roch of Trevaughan, in the parish of Tenby, 
husbandman. 21 pewter dishes, 2 tankards, a saucer, a pewter salt- 
cellar, and a chamber pott, 30s. 

1651 June 30. Jane Risam of Tenby, widow. 3 silk gowns and 
kirtle, a diamond ring, a silver gilt porringer, and 6 ' Postele silver 
spoons ' ; a gold ring ' with a Latin posie in it.' 

1651 Dec. 22. Thomas Williams of Wedlock, in the parish of Gum- 
freston, gent. 6 pewter dishes, a basin, and a flaggon, 4s. ; a silver 
watch, 13s. 4d. ; a silver spoon, 5s. ; a pearl gold ring, los. ; 5 silver 
shufQeboard pieces, 5s. ; a fowling piece, los. 

1659 May 8. Llewelin Harries of Tregwynt, in the parish of Gran- 
ston, gent. 52 lbs. of pewter and 3 old brass candlesticks, 30s. 

Only guesses can be made as to the population of 
Pembrokeshire prior to 1587, but in the following year 
George Owen, the Elizabethan historian of Pembroke- 
shire, compiled from the Muster Books a most interesting 
census, showing the number of householders, ploughs, 
dairies, and carts or truckles in each parish in the county, 
and below is given the figures relating to the different 
parishes in Dewisland, but arranged alphabetically for 
the convenience of reference, and with the addition of 
the different acreages of the parish (taken from Philpotts 
Map of Pembrokeshire), and also the estimated number 
of acres under plough in each parish. 



ii8 Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 



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Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 119 

As, roughly speaking, the land in the whole Dewisland 
is very much of the same character so far as ploughing 
is concerned, one would expect that within certain limits 
a plough would turn over as much ground in one parish 
as in another. Yet the above table shows a considerable 
difference in the proportions of the number of ploughs 
to the acre in the different parishes, and it will be interest- 
ing to try and ascertain what proportion of each parish 
consisted of ploughed land. Now in Dewisland the pole, 
according to George Owen, measured twelve feet, and 
eight poles in breadth by twenty poles in length made a 
stang, and four stangs made a Dewisland acre. On this 
basis the Dewisland acre would comprise 10,240 square 
yards. On the other hand the Statute acre is 4840 square 
yards, so that a Dewisland acre was equal to about 2^ 
Statute acres, or to be exact, two Statute acres and 560 
square yards. According to the same authority a plough- 
land (64 Welsh acres) was considered the most suitable 
area of land for one plough, and George Owen estimated 
that one plough would turn over enough land to put 
in 25 Welsh acres of crop, or 56^ Statute acres in a year. 
Therefore, multiplying 56^ acres by the number of 
ploughs in a parish, we get a rough idea of the acreage 
under plough in the different parishes, as shown in the 
last column of the above table. 

As all the old houses in Dewisland have been pulled 
down, remodelled or rebuilt, it is impossible to form 
an}^ accurate idea of the size or st34e of such buildings 
even as late as the middle of the seventeenth century. 
There is no doubt, however, that since Norman times 
there has been a gradual improvement in the size and 
conveniences of the dwellings, and particularly in thos< 
of the wealthier classes, in all parts of the county. In 
1670 a tax was placed on all hearths in Pembrokeshire, 
and the list of the taxpayers is still in existence. Un- 
fortunately, the document, although it records the names 
of the householders and the number of the hearths for 
which each was assessed, does not give, except in a very 



120 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

few instances, the names of the houses containing the 
hearths. However, it is possible to identify some of the 
more important residences in the county, and this enables 
one to obtain a rough idea of the sizes of the old houses. 
The identification of the houses in the parish of St. Davids 
is not so satisfactory as in some of the other parishes. 
The Hearth Tax Roll reveals that in the city of St. 
Davids the largest number of fire places (6 hearths) was 
paid for in 1670 by John Owen, clerk. 

Now the bishop's palace was undoubtedly the biggest 
house in the city, but tradition asserts that that edifice 
had been unroofed and abandoned during the episcopate 
of Bishop William Barlow (1536-48), and in any event 
it is certain that in 1661 the palace was in ruins, as in a 
suit brought in 1 670-1 by Bishop William Lucy against 
a certain Henry Williams, it was stated that the bishop 
had demised to the defendant ' all that decayed pallace 
of St. Davids ' and its appurtenances on 19 July, 1661, 
in as large a manner as James Mathias, esq. had held the 
same. This suit was brought to recover damages because 
Henry Williams had allowed ' one hall, one parlour, and 
two chambers ' to become uncovered, that is to say un- 
roofed. Whether Henry Williams resided in a portion 
of the palace is uncertain. The probability is that he 
lived in one of the old cottages which formerly stood in 
the courtyard of the palace, but it is obvious that his 
dwelling could not have been the house mentioned in 
the Hearth Tax Roll as having five hearths. One would 
naturally expect that after the bishop's palace, the next 
largest house in the city would have been that of the 
precentor. But in 1670 the precentor was William 
Thomas, while John Owen was only the sub-chanter of 
the Cathedral. The possible explanation is that the 
precentor had rented his house to the sub-chanter. This 
theory is to some extent borne out by the fact that the 
house of the vicars choral, of whom the sub-chanter 
was the head, is stated in the Chapter Acts to have been 
' ruined and decayed ' in 1693, and to such an extent 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



121 



that the Upper Chapter admonished the vicars to set 
by part of the next fine they received towards the re- 
building of their house. No other cleric seems to have 
paid a hearth tax in the city. George Williams, who 
was assessed for only two hearths, is described as clerk, 
but there is no record of any clergyman of that name in 
St. Davids at that date, and he was possibly the George 
Williams who was parish clerk in 1720. It would thus 
appear that all members of the Upper Chapter were then 
non-resident. 

The next largest house after that of John Owen was 
occupied by Thomas Hargest, who although not de- 
scribed in the Roll as a clerk, was a vicar choral, and he 
paid for four hearths. In some of the other parishes in 
the county the identification of the houses is more satis- 
factory, and for the sake of comparison the following 
entries have been selected : — 



Parish. Owners. 

Amroth . . . . John Elliott [Amroth Castle] 

Boulston . . Lewis Wogan [Manor house] 

Hamlets . . . . Sir Herbert Perrott [Haroldston] 

Llanstinan . . Morris Wogan [Llanstinan House] 

Nevern . . . . William Warren [Trewern] 

New Moat . . Wm. Scourfield [The Mote] 

Prendergast . . Sir John Stepney [Manor house] . . 

St. Issells . . Nicholas Lewis [Hean Castle] 

St. Lawrence . . William Ford [Stone Hall] 

Slebech . . . . Sir Erasmus Philipps [Picton Castle] 

Wiston . . . . Elizabeth Wogan [Manor house] . . 



No. of 
Hearths. 

5 

10 
4 
5 



4 
10 
II 



In the above list the words enclosed in square brackets 
are the identifications by the writer. Lewis Wogan of 
Boulston resided in the old mansion now in ruins by 
the river. The present house at Boulston was erected 
by Col. Ackland. Haroldston is the old ruined mansion 
about half a mile from Haverfordwest. Elizabeth Wogan 
was the widow of Rowland Wogan, and must then have 
been residing at the old manor house at W^iston (see West 
Wales Hist. Records, Vol. VI., p. 216). 

It would be very gratifying if it were possible to show 



122 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 



the gradual growth in the population of Pembrokeshire 
from early times, but this is impossible owing to the 
absence of reliable data. By the aid of George Owen's 
MSS., the Hearth Tax Roll, and other sources it has, 
however, been possible to compile the following table 
showing the number of inhabited houses and the popula- 
tion of the parish of St. Davids in the undermentioned 
years during the period 1587 — 1901 : — 

Parish of St. Davids. 



Year. 


No. of Houses. 


1587 


112 


1599 


91 


1670 


249 


1715^ 


276 


1720^ 


333 


iSoi*^ 


414 


1811^ 


437 


1821^ 


483 


1851' 


512 


1891* 


450 


1901* 


426 



Population. 


Average No. 
of inmates. 


259 


2.80 


1203 


4-35 


1530 


4-59 


1803 


4-39 


1816 


4.20 


2240 


4.64 


2513 


4.96 


1816 


4.04 


1739 


4.08 



The figure for the years 1587 and 1599 were compiled 
by George Owen for the former year from the Sheriffs' 
books, and for the latter year from the Muster Books. 
The number of houses for 1670 is taken from the list 
of householders in the Hearth Tax Roll, and includes 104 
paupers who were not liable for the tax. 

In 1593 and for a century afterwards it was the custom 
in Pembrokeshire and also in Carmarthenshire to rent 
live stock with or without land to tenants. George Owen 
in his Taylor's Cussion gives a balance sheet of the cost 
of the stock and the profit in the case of cattle and sheep 
in 1593 on the basis of 40 kine and 400 sheep. In this 
account the cost of the cattle when purchased was £6^, 
and the yearly return was £58 3s. 4d., while the yearly 



1 Browne Willis' Survey of St. Davids Cathedral. 

2 Compiled by Rev. Henry Goffe, sub-chanter in 1720. 

* Jones and Freeman's Hist, of St. Davids Cathedral, pp. 366, 367. 

* Census for 1901. 



Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 123 

return for 400 sheep (costing £66 13s. 4d.) was £33 i6s. 8d. 
On the other hand kine were rented without land at 
5s. per head, and sheep at 6d. per head, but he points 
out that in the case of rented cattle the owner by the 
custom of the country has to stand all loss in respect 
of any of the cattle which died or were injured, while 
in the case of rented sheep the lessor was liable to no 
risk as ' he that taketli the same [i.e., the sheep] to rent 
doth answere the whole stocke agayne at his perrill.' 
It will be remembered that Erasmus Saunders and his 
wife in 1597 rented to John White the messuage and 
lands called Tremoillet in the parish of Eglwyskymmin, 
CO. Carmarthen, together with 12 cows, 8 oxen, and 100 
sheep, at the yearh' rent of £22. There are records of 
several lettings of live stock in Pembrokeshire, but it 
will suffice to give merel}' a few examples. 

The first is a letting by Alban Stepneth of Prendergast, 
who rented to Moris Hancocke ' 40 good sufficient lambs ' 
with their wool for a term of five years at the yearly 
rent of 13s. 4d., and the tenant was to deliver up to the 
lessor at the end of the term the like number of lambs or 
2s. 6d. for each lamb at the option of the lessor. 

The next example it will be seen is rather of the nature 
of a profit-sharing transaction. On 16 Dec, 1601, Phillip 
Deverose of the parish of Lambston, 3'eoman, demised 
to Moris ap Rees ap Morgan of the parish of St. Issells, 
husbandman, for three years a messuage and land called 
Bsker Krig in the parish of Llandissilio (then held by 
him under a lease from James Philipps of Benbagh,^ 
gent.), together with two kine and four plough beasts, 
namely, two horses and two oxen, and 150 sheep, the 
yearly rent being two stones of sound dry marketable 
cheese, four gallons of butter per cow, making in all 
20 stones of cheese and 4 gallons of butter, also a one- 
fourth share of the wool, a one-fourth share of the lambs, 
one-half of the calves from the said kine, and one-half 

1 Pentypark. 



124 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

of the corn grown. The tenant was to keep the cattle 
with lawful herds both winter and summer to prevent them 
from being drowned or mired, and to keep the sheep from 
being stolen or killed by dogs, and to return the said 
stock to Deverose at the end of the term. 

The next example is the letting of a farm, with live 
stock and implements on lo Feb., 1606-7, when Philip 
Picton of Martletwy, yeoman, leased to John Thomas, 
then late of Lawrenny, husbandman, a messuage and 
lands in the fields of Scollock in the parish of Ambleston, 
together with 10 kine, 4 oxen, 60 sheep, 2 horses, a 
mare, a cart bound with iron, a plough with iron, and 
two pairs of harrows with their teeth, for five 3'ears at 
the yearly rent of £13 6s. 8d. The description of the 
plough and harrows suggests that both these implements 
largely consisted of wood. Extremely interesting must 
have been the lease of Carew Castle and lands granted 
to Edward Webb by Sir John Carew of Croombe Court, 
CO. Somerset, knt. The lease itself is missing, but from 
a suit in the Great Sessions brought by Sir John Carew 
against Margaret Webb of Alleston, the widow and 
executrix of Edward Webbe, late of Carew Castle, esq., 
to recover £100 damages for cutting down trees and for 
other breaches of covenant, it appears that Edward Webb 
on 30 Nov., 1605, agreed to surrender the lease to Sir 
John Carew, but with the right to occupy the property 
until 25 Mar., 1607-8. In the meantime Webb was to 
preserve the deer in the park, but had the privilege of 
killing two bucks ; he was also to leave 400 sheep and 
40 other cattle for Sir John Carew. 

Other cases of lettings of live stock in Pembrokeshire 
are to be found in the Papers of the Great Sessions up to 
the latter part of the 17th century, but we must content 
ourselves with one more example, which although not 
so stated in the document, probably occurred in the 
parish of Hayscastle. In this case an action was brought 
by Francis Harries, gent., against William Howell in 
1665-6 for damages under a bond, which recited that 



Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 125 

the defendant has rented from the plaintiff 40 ewes at 
the yearly rent of 20s. 

For the period 1542 — 1700 interesting sidelights can 
be obtained from the plea Rolls touching the com- 
mercial and social life in Pembrokeshire. We learn for 
instance from these documents that on 20 Aug., 1597, 
David Canon bought from Thomas Canon in High St., 
Haverfordwest, 60 barrels of white Portugal salt at 12s. 
per barrel, making a total of ^^36, to be delivered in one 
month's time, but that the latter had not delivered the 
salt in November following, with the result that David 
Canon sued him for £100 damages. Then Henry Saunders 
and William Moore undertook to deliver before 20 July, 
1604, to William Walter of Haverfordwest at his house, 
eight bushels of wheat of the measure then used in the 
town and county of Haverfordwest. William Walter 
was an alderman of that town, and was the brother of 
Moris Walter, the ancestor of the Walters of Roch Castle. 
This reference to the particular measure by which the 
wheat was sold reminds us that almost every town had 
its own individual weights and measures. For example, 
the Haverfordwest, Pembroke, and Tenby bushels con- 
tained 16 gallons or double the Winchester bushel. In 
Dewisland the bushel in use was somewhat larger, while 
the Cardigan bushel was double the size of the Haverford- 
west bushel. This variety of measures was not confined 
to Pembrokeshire. The same state of affairs prevailed 
in Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire, and corn mer- 
chants must have found their business somewhat intricate 
in those days. 

From the same records we have evidence that Pem- 
brokeshire merchants in 1597 were exporting frieze and 
other merchandize to France. In this trade was a Walter 
Philpin who was no doubt Walter Philpin, alderman of 
Tenby, who died between the years 1610 and 1613, and 
was the owner of Caldy Island, which he had purchased 
a little before 1610 from John Bradshaw of St. Dogmael's. 
It appears from the document that a certain John ]\Iorris 



126 Pembrokeshire in By -gone Days. 

had freighted a ship called the Edward of Carmarthen, 
from the port of Carmarthen to go to France, and that 
he agreed to transport to Brest or Conquett in France 
a consignment of merchandize and marine goods and ' 80 
pieces of cotton and frizes ' belonging to Walter Philpin, 
for the sum of £so. The goods were loaded on the ship 
at Tenby on 12 Dec, 1597, ^^^ John Morris did not land 
the goods as agreed, with the intention, it was alleged, of 
defrauding Philpin, who as a result sued him for £50 
damages. 

As might be expected a good deal of the business at 
the Great Sessions consisted of actions for the recovery 
of debts and penalties under bonds. The defence to 
these actions were pretty much the same as at the 
present day, but in more than one instance occurs the 
somewhat curious defence that the defendant could not 
have signed the bond because he was in prison at the 
time. In 1607 a very interesting prosecution occurred. 
A grand jur}^ presented that Katharine Lewis of Gum- 
freston, spinster, otherwise Katherine Bowen (wife of 
Thomas Bowen of Tenby, yeoman) , ' by the instigation 
of the Devil performed diabolical artes called witch- 
crafts, inchantments, charmes, and sorceries at Gum- 
freston on 27 June in that year,' by reason of which 
Richard Brownynge of Gumfreston suffered ' great loss 
in his goods and chattels.' Unfortunately only the 
presentment exists, and we know nothing of the fate of 
the unlucky lady. This is the only indictment for witch- 
craft in Pembrokeshire, which has come under the 
writer's notice, and it is interesting to note that the sole 
case on record occurred in the south of the county, and 
close to the district in which charming still prevails. 

Under the witchcraft Act, passed in 1603, offenders 
were divided into two degrees, those of the first degree 
being sentenced as felons without benefit of clergy, while 
for those of the second degree the penalty was one year's 
imprisonment, and the pillory for a first offence, but for 
a second offence they were adjudged to be felons without 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 127 

the benej&t of clergy. If, therefore, Katherine Bowen 
had been convicted under the indictment, she would, in 
the event of its being her first offence, have been sen- 
tenced as under the second degree, as her alleged opera- 
tions had been to injure cattle and goods and not persons. 

Some 50 years later accusations of witchcraft were 
evidently still made in the county, but these apparently 
did not lead to criminal indictments, from which it may 
be assumed that common sense and humanity in regard 
to such matters has greatly increased in the county, as 
we learn from the Papers of the Great Sessions for 1661 
that Morris James of Haverfordwest, gent., and Mary 
his wife brought an action for £200 damages for de- 
famation of character against Peter Davids of the same 
town and his wife Mary, because they had publicly 
stated, ' Thou Mary (meaning Mary James) hast be- 
witched my child and my drinke, and my child is yet 
sick and thou did'st doe it.' 

Dewisland, so far as is revealed by the Plea Rolls, 
appears to have been free from witchcraft, but it cer- 
tainly was not free from cases of defamation of character 
and slander. Thus in June, 1603, Nicholas Binks (who 
was a vicar choral in 1611 and subchantor of St. Davids 
Cathedral in 1644) brought an action for damages for 
defamation of character against Rice Roberts of St. 
Davids, yeoman, who had openly stated in St. Davids, 
' There were bords stolen, and Nicholas Binks ys making 
search for the same bords that were so stolen out of the 
college of St. Davids, and the same bords he himself 
stoole them and they be now in his carte, which I will 
prove.' At the same sessions Rice Williams sued Thomas 
Philip David, junior, of Tregynys (near St. Davids), for 
defaming him at St. Davids by alleging that the plairtiff 
was ' a stealer of shirts.' On the other hand in July, 
1608, we find that Edward Beard of St. Davids, clerk, 
who was afterwards subchanter of the cathedral in 1622, 
was sued by David Lloyd, gent., for stating that ' David 
Lloid is a murtherer, and he had murthered John of 
lylanboydye.' 



128 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Prior to the statute of 5 & 6 Edw. VI. an^^one could 
keep an alehouse without a licence, but by that statute 
it was enacted that no one should keep any common 
alehouse or tippling house without a licence from two 
justices of the peace. It is easy to understand that for 
some time after the passing of this Act — ^the first Li- 
censing Act in the country — there were numerous con- 
traventions of the Statute, but even some 50 years later 
there must have been a considerable number of un- 
licensed houses in which ale was sold, and it is rather a 
shock to our modern ideas to find that some of the clergy 
were presented for keeping illicit shebeens. There is in 
existence a record of the presentment of a grand jury of 
the sessions, which is undated, but is evidently about 
the year 1605, which records some nine alehouses for 
which the owners had no licenses, among the tavern 
keepers being David Lloyd of the parish of Jordanston, 
and Edward Gwyn, clerk, vicar of Llandissilio. In 

Sept., 1615, Thomas of St. Dogmells, clerk, was 

presented at the sessions for keeping at St. Dogmells 
without a licence a common tippling house, and for 
selling ale and beer, and Hugh Johnes of Llanychaer, 
smith, was likewise presented for the same offence. The 
surname of the former is blank in the document, but he 
was no doubt Thomas Price, who was vicar of St. Dog- 
mells in 1614. 

Actions for ejectment from land were very numerous 
at the Great Sessions, and there were frequent replevin 
and other suits brought in regard to distraints and re- 
moval of live stock. From an early date considerable 
hardships were caused by the bailiffs, who, probably 
with a view of increasing the costs or for other reasons, 
used to take the stock distrained to places several miles 
away instead of putting it into a pound near by. This 
practice must have become very prevalent, as an Act 
was passed on 12 Sept., 1554, prohibiting stock dis- 
trained in any hundred, wapentake, or lath being taken 
except to an open pound in the same county not more 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 129 

than three miles from the place of seizure. Yet this Act 
did not altogether put a stop to the practice, as William 
David, in a suit against Owen Wogan Jenkin and Thomas 
John, stated that the defendants on 5 Sept., 1665, had 
distrained two black horses worth £5 at Fishguard, and 
had taken them to the pound of the hundred of Dewis- 
land, more than three miles away. 

As the Plea Rolls and Papers of the Great Sessions 
chiefly cover the civil business at the Sessions, we have 
to fall back on the gaol files in order to obtain light on 
the criminal activity in the county. The houses of the 
wealthy in 1603 seem to have attracted the attention of 
burglars as much as in the twentieth century. We find 
for instance that David ap leuan of Morvill, labourer, 
was indicted for burglarizing the mansion of Thomas 
lyloyd of Kilkiffeth, in the parish of Llanychaer, esq., on 
22 Dec. in that year, and stealing a great silver salt, 
double gilt, worth £y ; two silver bowls, parcel gilt, 
worth £8 ; a silver goblet, parcel gilt, worth 40s. ; and 
6 silver spoons worth £3. Even the houses of persons of 
smaller incomes did not escape, as in Aug., 1645, a thief, 
whose name is not mentioned, plundered the house of 
David William James, in the parish of lylanhowell, and 
stole bedding and clothing out of it. 

Let us now see what provision was made for education 
in the county. In the first place there was the grammar 
school of St. Davids Cathedral, the date of the founda- 
tion of which is unknown, but it was certainly in exist- 
ence in 1650. This school would appear to have been 
the earliest educational establishment in the county, but 
on 22 Nov., 1613, Thomas Lloyd of Kilkifteth (whose 
house was burglarized in 1603 as mentioned above), 
who was sheriff for the county in that year, and had 
previously served that office in 1596, conveyed to the 
mayor of Haverfordwest and certain feoffees a number 
of messuages and lands in and about the town of Haver- 
fordwest on trust, ' to cause a sufiicient grammar school 
to be kept in some convenient place within the town of 
I 



130 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

Haverfordwest, where scholars may be taught such 
leammg and knowledge as are fitting to be taught in a 
grammar school, which school was to be called the Free 
Grammar School of Haverfordwest, first founded by 
Thomas Lloyd of Kilkythyed, Pembrokeshire, esq.' 
The deed provided that the rents of the properties were 
to be employed in keeping some meet, able, discreet, and 
learned man in the Latin tongue. This endowment was 
later on augmented by John Millward, who by his will 
dated lo June, 1654, devised to trustees a one-third 
share of eight houses and 21 parcels of land called Hens 
Farm (52a. 29p.), situate at Bordesley, near Birmingham, 
on trust (as to one-third thereof) for the Haverfordwest 
Grammar School founded by Thomas Lloyd, and on 
trust (as to another one-third thereof) for the Birming- 
ham School, and on trust (as to the remaining one-third) 
for the support of a scholar at Brazenose College, Oxford, 
from the Haverfordwest or Birmingham schools. 

But besides the above-mentioned grammar schools, it 
is clear that there was a certain amount of private 
tuition going on in the country districts, not only in 
regard to industrial arts, but also in letters. The Plea 
Rolls show that Henry Philpe at Muncton on 8 July, 
1620, agreed with Alice, the wife of Mardocus Roberts, 
to teach Jenett (daughter of Henry Philps) to work with 
her needle at Robert's house. Jenett remained there 20 
weeks, but her father refused to pay for her board, so 
Roberts and his wife sued him for £4.. In 1638 John 
Lloyd of Trevach, in the parish of Llanvair Nantgwyn, 
placed his daughter Elizabeth with Richard Johnes and 
his wife Dorothy to be taught by them, but John Lloyd 
declined to pay the tuition fees, and was sued for the 
amount in 1642. Further evidence of local private 
education is afforded by the Papers of the Great Sessions 
for 1653, which hand down to us the fact that Mary 
(afterwards wife of Griffith Tankard of Camrose), on 
25 Nov., 1649, before her marriage to her husband, 
agreed at Roch with John Price, clerk, to board, lodge. 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 131 

and educate at his house at Fishguard one Richard Birt 
for the sum of £6 per annum. The document goes on to 
say that Richard Birt was boarded and educated for 2^ 
years, but the £15 due for the same not having been 
paid, she and her husband, Griffith Tankard, were sued 
for the amount. Mary Tankard was the daughter of 
Thomas Hay ward of Fletherhill, in the parish of Rud- 
baxton, and Richard Birt was no doubt the son of her 
aunt Frances Hayward by her husband Robert Birt of 
Llwyndyris, while John Price was the vicar of Fishguard. 

It is very regrettable that so many of the early records 
of the episcopate of St. Davids have been lost. Other- 
wise it would have been possible to obtain a very com- 
plete list of all schools in the diocese, as under the Act 
of 23 Eliz. (1580-1) all schoolmasters had to be licensed 
by the bishop. So far the only records of schoolmasters' 
licences which have come under the writer's observation 
are in a Register of Bishop William Lucy, containing 
sequestrations and dispensations for the period 1683 — 
1708. This book shows that in Aug., 1670, William 
Robistin was licensed to carry on his office of school- 
master in the parish of Tenby. In 1673 John Evans and 
Thomas Hitchings were licensed to keep schools at 
Narberth and Stackpoole Elider respectively. In 1676 
David Rice, clerk, was granted permission to keep a 
school at Spittle, and in the following year Robert Angel, 
clerk, was given a like permit to teach at St. Florence. 
Robert Angel was the son of Luke Angel, who, described 
as Lewis Angell, was bishop's vicar of St. Davids Cathe- 
dral in 161 1. 

Some of the marriage settlements in the last part of 
the 1 6th and in the early part of the following century 
are very interesting. Among the wealthier members of 
the community it was generally the custom for the 
parents of the contracting parties to enter into a pre- 
nuptial agreement, whereby they covenanted that the 
intended bridegroom and bride would marry each other 
before a certain date, and also that the parents would 



132 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

after the marriage conve}^ certain property to trustees 
on trusts specified therein. After the celebration of the 
marriage the actual settlement was executed. This was 
the usual practice in North as well as in South Wales. 
In the case of less affluent persons the agreement was 
often omitted, and they contented themselves with a 
single settlement, which was executed either before or 
after the marriage, and sometimes not for many years 
after the event. When the parents were wealthy the 
bridegroom's father usually settled either a part of the 
estate (or the whole of it subject to a life interest therein 
for the father) on his son for life, with remainder (subject 
to an annuity for the bride for her life) on the issue of 
the intended marriage. In the case of persons of more 
modest incomes the same principle was followed, but the 
bride was given, after the death of her husband, a life 
interest in the property or in some part thereof, and the 
marriage portion of the bride, usually in money, was 
paid either to the father of the bridegroom or to the 
bridegroom himself. 

But in many of these settlements a proviso was in- 
serted that in the event of the bride dying without issue, 
and within a short specified period after her marriage, 
her portion or a proportion of it was to be repaid to the 
parent or next of kin of the bride. As a rule marriage 
settlements in Pembrokeshire followed the first-men- 
tioned type, but there were some of the second type. 
Thus by a prenuptial settlement dated 20 April, 1625, 
John William Hugh of [Trearched in the] parish of 
lylanrhian, husbandman, and Jenett his wife, in con- 
sideration of the intended marriage of his grandson 
George William to Barbara David (daughter of David 
Harrie James of Porthyddy Vawr, in the same parish, 
yeoman), conveyed to trustees the farms of Trearched 
aforesaid and Trewalter, in the parish of Mathry, on 
trust (as to Trearched) for the said John William Hugh 
for his life, with remainder (subject to a life estate in 
one-third part thereof to the said Jenett) to George Wil- 



Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. i33 

Ham for his life, with remainder to the said Barbara 
David for her life, with remainder to the issue of the 
said intended marriage ; and on trust (as to Trewalter) 
for George William and Barbara David, and the sur- 
vivor of them for their lives (but subject to an annuity 
of 208. yearly to the said Jenett for her life in the event 
of her surviving John William Hugh), with remainder to 
the issue of the intended marriage. John William Hugh 
covenanted to maintain George William and Barbara 
David, and any children they might have during the 
lifetime of John William Hugh, and also to bequeath to 
them all his household goods and implements. The 
father of the bride covenanted to give £20 as a marriage 
portion for his daughter, of which sum £8 was to be paid 
to John William Hugh, ^^3 to the bridegroom, and £g 
towards discharging a mortgage on part of the settled 
property. It was also provided that in the event of the 
bride dying without issue within twelve months of the 
marriage, the sum of £20 was to be repaid to her father. 
The foregoing was the settlement of a yeoman farmer in 
Pembrokeshire, and is a fair example of settlements 
made by persons in his rank of life, but in Cardiganshire 
and other parts of Wales and the Llarches there are 
cases when the settled property consisted of only a 
single farmhouse, of the parents reserving the right to 
occupy certain rooms in the house, portions of the out- 
buildings, and a part of the garden for their lives ; in 
other cases the bridegroom undertook to board and 
lodge his parents, or else to pay them a small annuity 
for their lives. 

Pembrokeshire people, especially Pembrokeshire juries, 
have for years been noted for their clemency but 
apparently in by-gone days this compassion did not in 
all cases extend to shipwrecked mariners, so far at all 
events as their goods were concerned. Among the 
Papers of the Great Sessions for 1691-2, is a petition 
from George Lately, of Pool, co. Dorset, to the justices 
of the Great Sessions, stating that being the owner and 



134 Pembrokeshire in By-gone Days. 

master of the ship Resolution, laden with coal and other 
commodities from Milford, he sailed for Pool on 2 Mar. 
[1690] , but was blown ashore at Newgale, Pembrokeshire, 
where he was ' almost totally robbed and deprived of 
what the merciless waves had reduced him unto, by the 
more unmerciful people of that neighbouhood.' He 
therefore prayed to be allowed to sue in forma pauperis 
David Morse, James George, Howell Phillips, Richard 
Phillips, and others, ' who did soe barbarously robe and 
carry away his goods. His petition was granted, but 
whether he obtained any compensation is not revealed 
by the document. 

The parish Register of Nolton contains a most in- 
teresting account of a wrecking catastrophe at Druidston, 
in the parish of Nolton, on 4 Jan., 1791, in which eight 
wreckers were killed and several injured through an 
explosion of gunpowder in the cargo. 

In the same Register is recorded particulars of a later 
wreck, written by Francis Warlow, a schoolmaster at 
Nolton, who states that another ship called the Linen 
Hall from Dublin, bound to the West Indies in ballast, 
was stranded on the night of the 25th Dec, 1810, in 
Druidston, that is, she was driven against the point the 
north side of a little creek under Druidston Cliff ; totally 
wrecked, no lives lost, little plundered ; she was torn up 
and the timber and rigging sold to the country people. 

From this it would appear that a considerable im- 
provement in the customs and morals of the local 
wreckers has taken place in the interval since 1791. 



Scurlock of Carmarthen. 



By FRANCIS GREEN. 



A history of the Scurlock family is interesting not only 
on account of its connection with Sir Richard Steele, 
the celebrated essayist and dramatic writer, but also on 
account of the family having held a prominent place 
in the town of Carmarthen. According to an inscription 
on the tomb of John Scurlock in St. Peter's Church, who 
died in 1682,^ the ancestors of the Carmarthen Scurlocks 
came from Ireland. However this may have been, it is 
certain that there were persons of that name in its earlier 
form in West Wales at the end of the 13th century. 
In 1299 a John Scurlagh was a witness to a charter from 
Joan de Valence (the mother of Aymer de Valence), 
countess of Pembroke, to John called Oysel, the prior 
of Pembroke, granting that the prior and monks of 
Pembroke should not be bound to answer in the court 
of the gate of Pembroke Castle for any plea, but should 
answer before her steward in the county court of Pem- 
broke. This charter was signed at Goodrich Castle, co. 
Hereford, but it is very probable that John Scurlagh 
came from Pembroke, and it is the more probable as a 
Herbert Scorlagg was a witness to a charter of William 
de Cantington, granting about the year 1290 to the abbey 
of St. Dogmael's, co. Pembroke, all his interest in the 
land of Fissegard.^ 

In the 3'ear 1300 we find that a Henry Scurlag was 
constable of Dynevor Castle, and that he received yearly 



1 The new style of the year has been adopted throughout this 
article. 

2 Fishguard. 



136 Scurlock of Carmarthen. 

£40 for himself and 24 men in the garrison of the castle.^ 
Moreover, a Henry Sculag, probably the same person, 
was tenant of the town mill of Dynevor at the rent of 
8s. per annum, and likewise held eight acres of demesne 
land near the castle at the yearly rent of 13s. 4d. In 
1302 he held the same mill and land, and in addition 
the Tolsester^ {i.e., the duty paid by tenants of some 
manors to the lord for liberty to brew and sell ale) of 
Llandeilovawr, the said tolchester being of the yearly 
value of IDS. 

In 1325 when the division of the property of Aymer 
de Valence was made, among the tenants mentioned 
was John Scorlagh who held half a knight's fee in Kil- 
kemoran, and one-tenth part of a knight's fee in Coytrath, 
both those places being in the south part of Pembroke- 
shire.^ It is thus clear that he held a substantial interest 
in that county. 

It is quite possible that a member of the Scurlock 
family may have crossed to Ireland, as many of the 
Normans and Pembrokeshire Welshmen in those days 
crossed the channel to Ireland, and that a descendant 
may have returned to Wales and settled in Cardigan. 
At all events the first direct ancestor of the Carmarthen 
Scurlocks, of whom record has been found, is John 
Scurlock, senior, who was a tanner, residing in Cardigan. 
His wife was Jane Gibbon, and he evidently died in good 
circumstances, as he owned realty in the parishes of 
Cardigan and . . . . , which he had purchased from 
John Phillips of Blaentaf in the parish of Llanfirnach. 
This property he devised by his will dated 8 July, 1625, 
and proved at Carmarthen in October following, to his 
son David Scurlock, subject to a life interest therein 
to his wife Jane Gibbon, to whom and to his son David 
he bequeathed his plate. The value of his effects was 



1 West Wales Hist. Records, Vol. I., pp. 177, 178, 181. 
8 Close Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 



Scurlock of Cay may then. 137 

;f86 los. 8d. The children of John Scurlock, senior, 
presumably by his wife Jane Gibbon, were : — 

1. David Scurlock, a cordwainer. 

2. Leonard Scurlock. 

3. John Scurlock, junior, a tanner. 

4. Walter Scurlock, who predeceased his father and 

left a son called Richard. 

5. Joan Scurlock, who according to Alcwyn Evans' 

MS., married George Gwyn of Carmarthen. 

6. Elizabeth Scurlock, who married Richard Harries. 

7. Anne Scurlock, who married Griffith Thomas, 

David Scurlock, the son of John Scurlock, senior, 
carried on the business of a cordwainer and mercer, 
and was mayor of Cardigan. He lived in the troublous 
times of the war between King Charles I. and the Parlia- 
ment, and received barbarous treatment by the Royalists. 
According to a certificate given by Major-Gen. Rowland 
Laugharne on i Mar., 1648, ' David Scurlock, mercer 
of Cardigan and mayor, was well affected, had a large 
estate and furthered the Parliament cause ; in 1644, 
rather than comply with the enemy, he left the town 
and his whole estate to their mercy, came into my quar- 
ters in Pembrokeshire, took the National Covenant 
amongst the first, was with me at the reducing of Cardigan, 
and when General Gerrard came down with a pursuant 
army, he was escaping, but was taken by Thomas Price 
and John Pugh, Commissioners of Array, and sent to 
Aberystwyth prison, where he was most barbarously 
used, burnt in the toes, stripped of all he had, and kept 
in close prison till I procured his exchange ; he was 
also plundered of his estate to great value, and his wife 
and children imprisoned, only for affection to the Parlia- 
ment and zeal to religion.'^ 

An information lodged on i Mar., 1647, which states 
that the estates of Thomas Price and John Pugh had 

1 Papers of the Committee for the Advance of Money, 1647. 



138 Scurlock of Carmarthen. 

not then been sequestrated, gives further details as to 
the treatment meeted out by them to David Scurlock in 
Aberystw\i;h Castle. It asserts that ' he was barbarously 
used, manacled, stripped, burnt with matches between 
his fingers and toes, robbed and plundered of his whole 
estate.' 

Nothing further is known of David Scurlock. Alcwyn 
Evans asserts in his MS. that he married the sister of 
Harries of Blaencorse, but unfortunately he gives no 
authority for the information. The next member of the 
family we hear of is John Scurlock, who had settled at 
Carmarthen and was mayor of that town in 1665, and 
also an alderman. The writer has so far discovered no 
evidence as to the identity of his parents, but it can 
hardly be doubted that he was the son either of David 
Scurlock or of one of the brothers of David Scurlock. 
Alcwyn Evans asserts that he was the son of David 
Scurlock, and that he had two sisters, Margaret who 
married Rees Gwyn, and Jane who married Bartholomew 
Young of Tregammon in the parish of Nevern, co. Pem- 
broke, the latter marriage being corroborated by the 
Peniarth MS. No. 156. The same genealogist also states 
that John Scurlock married Mary the daughter of George 
Oakley [of Carmarthen], and this is probably correct, 
for as we shall see later on there is evidence that his 
wife's name was Mary. 

John Scurlock was evidently a man of importance, as 
in all documents he is described as an esquire. He owned 
the capital messuage and lands called Pibwr lylwyd 
in the parish of Llangunnor, co. Carmarthen, a property 
which has recently caused so much controversy on ac- 
count of the high purchase price paid for it by the Car- 
marthenshire County Council. He also owned the 
messuage and lands called Nantybwla in the borough 
of Carmarthen, and other realty, all of which he mortgaged 
on 17 Aug., 1674, for /^5oo by way of a demise for 1000 
years at a pepper corn rent to James Whitechurch of 
the city of London. John Scurlock was buried at St. 



Scurlock of Carmarthen. i39 

Peter's Church, Carmarthen, on 21 April, 1678, and 
administration of his goods was granted at Carmarthen 
on 12 May, 1679, to his eldest son Jonathan vScurlock, 
Mary, the widow of the deceased, having renounced 
administration. She died in i6gg, and by her will dated 
II Feb., 1697, bequeathed as follows : — 

To my daughter Jane Phillipps, ^^30 ; to the vicar 
of St. Peter, Carmarthen and his successors, 20s. yearly 
for two sermons to be preached yearly on the feast of 
St. Michael the Archangel, and the feast of St. Philip 
and St. James the Apostle, also i6s. yearly for bread 
for the poor on such feasts, both these legacies to be 
charged on the house wherein I live ; to my second son 
John Scurlock, 20s. to buy a ring ; to my daughter 
Elizabeth Beynon, my grandchild Mary Scurlock, my 
son in law Griffith Williams, my brother in law John 
Phillipps of Carmarthen, alderman, my son in law James 
Phillipps, and my son in law Martyn Beynon, 20s. each 
for rings ; to m}^ said brother in law John Phillipps, my 
said son John Scurlock, and my son in law James Phillipps, 
all my houses and lands in Carmarthen in as ample a 
way as I purchased, mortgaged, or leased the same of 
my daughter in law Elizabeth Scurlock, widow, and 
William Davids of Drenglo3me,^ co. Carmarthen, gent., 
and also all my other realty and personalty on trust for 
the appointees of my daughter Mary, the wife of the said 
Griffith Williams, gent. ; the said John Phillipps, John 
Scurlock, and James Phillipps to be executors. 

By a codicil dated 23 Jan., 1699, she devised a farm 
called Flandershill, otherwise Landershill or Pentrecill in 
the lower franchise of Carmarthen, to her said daughter 
Mary Williams, the wife of Griffith Williams, esq., then 
ma^'or of Carmarthen, which said farm she mentions 
that she had bought from Walter Davids of the parish 
of I/lanelly, gent., and Jane his wife. Administration 

* Dryslwyn. 



140 Scurlock of Carmarthen. 

of the will was granted at Carmarthen on 2 Aug., 1699, 
to ^lar^' Williams, otherwise Llo^^d, the wife of William 
Llo3'd, gent, and daughter of the testatrix. 

The issue of John Scurlock by his wife Mary was as 
as follows : — 

1. Jonathan Scurlock (eldest son). 

2. John Scurlock of Blaencorse. 

3. Mary Scurlock, who married as her first husband 

Griffith Williams of Bwlchygwynt in the county 
of Carmarthen, and secondly William Llo^^d of 
AUtycadno in the parish of lylangendeirne, co. 
Carmarthen. 

4. Elizabeth Scurlock, who married on 17 June, i673> 

at St. Peter's Church, Carmarthen, Martin Beynon 
of Carmarthen, alderman. 

5. Margaret Scurlock, who married on 9 Nov., 1675, at 

St. Peter's Church, Carmarthen, John Morris. 

6. Jane Scurlock, who married James Philipps of 

Pentj^park, co. Pembroke. 

Jonathan Scurlock (son of John Scurlock and his wife 
Mary) married on 3 Aug., 1677, ^^ St. Peter's Carmarthen, 

Elizabeth . The surname of his wife is left 

blank in the Register, and is also not mentioned in her 
postnuptial settlement, dated 18 Mar., 1679, whereby 
the farms called Pibwr Lwyd and Nantybwla were 
settled on Jonathan Scurlock for his life, with remainder 
in tail to his issue by his said wife. Alcwyn Evans' MS. 
states that Jonathan Scurlock's wife Elizabeth, was the 

daughter of Still of Worcester, and she was 

probably from that county, as two of the trustees of the 
settlement were Timothy Twitty, gent., and Roger Clerk, 
baker, both of Worcester. Jonathan Scurlock entered 
Trinity College, Cambs., and afterwards was admitted 
at Grays Inn on 29 April, 1675. He died on 19 June, 
1682, at the early age of 27 years, and was buried at St. 
Peter's Church, Carmarthen, on 19 June, 1682. B3' his 



Scurlock of Carmarthen. 141 

will dated 15 June, 1682, and proved at Carmarthen on 
8 Nov., 1682, he bequeathed to his brother John Scurlock 
a cellar in the quay at Carmarthen. 

The only issue from the marriage of Jonathan Scurlock 
and his wife Elizabeth, was a daughter named Mary 
Scurlock, who was baptized on 5 Nov., 1678, and married 
Sir Richard Steele, knt. They resided for a time in a 
house close to the River Towy, near the present farm- 
house called Tygwyn in the parish of lylangunnor, but 
after the death of his wife, who was buried on 26 Dec, 
1718, in Westminster Abbey, he lived at his house in 
King St., Carmarthen, which formerly occupied the site 
of the present Assembly Rooms, where he died on i Sept., 
1729, and was buried at St. Peter's Church, Carmarthen, 
on 4 Sept. in that year.^ The issue of the marriage of 
Sir Richard Steele and his wife Mary Scurlock, was : — 

1. Richard.^ 

2. Engene.^ 

3. Elizabeth Steele. 

4. Mary Steele, who died a spinster. 

Elizabeth Steele (daughter of Sir Richard Steele by 
his wife Mary Scurlocke), on 3 Aug., 1731, disentailed 
the property of her grandfather Jonathan Scurlocke, and 
on 31 Mar., 1732, in view of her intended marriage to 
the Hon. John Trevor (second son of Thomas lyord 
Trevor), and of a sum of £7000 South Sea Stock, and £1000 
to be applied in discharge of her debts, both of the said 
sums being provided by the Hon. John Trevor, conveyed 
the said properties to trustees on trust for her intended 
husband and herself for their lives, with remainders over, 
and with ultimate remainder to herself in fee simple. 
The marriage was duly solemnized, and the Hon. John 
Trevor afterwards became Lord Trevor, and died in 
1764 without issue, leaving his widow and an only daugh- 



1 Spurrell's History of Carmarthen, p. 39. 

2 Died young. — Carmarthenshire Notes. 



142 Scurlock of Carmarthen. 

ter, the Hon. Diana Maria Trevor, who was born on 10 
June, 1744, him surviving. The Hon. Diana Maria 
Trevor became mentally afflicted, and died at Foxcote 
near Bath in Jan., 1778. 

On 2 Dec, 1767, Lady Elizabeth Trevor {nee Steele), 
then residing in Bath, mortgaged her grandfather's 
property mentioned above, together with other lands for 
£7958 to John Lloyd of Plymouth Dock, esq., who was 
one of the Lloyd's of Danyrallt, co. Carmarthen. She 
apparently continued to live beyond her income, as on 
5 Dec, 1770, she conveyed the property to trustees to 
raise £26,000 by the sale of it, and in the meantime to 
raise by mortgage £12,000 for her own use. 

The trustees on 2 May, 1772, sold the farms called 
Tythin Nant y Bullock, otherwise Nant y Bwla, and 
Ffoes y Gasseg in the parishes of St. Peter's and New- 
church, CO. Carmarthen, for the sum of £4160 to David 
Williams of Carmarthen. 

We must now revert to John Scurlocke, junior, of 
Blaencorse, the younger son of John Scurlock of Pibwr 
Llwyd, by Mary his wife. John Scurlocke, junior, was 
mayor of Carmarthen in 1702, and deputy mayor and 
alderman of that town in 17 10. His wife's name was 
Hester, but her identity has not been discovered. He 
was buried on 25 Oct., 1714, at St. Peter's Church, 
Carmarthen, and by his will dated 11 Dec, 171 2, and 
proved at Carmarthen on 17 May, 1715, by his widow, 
devised his realty and personalty to his wife Hester, 
for her widowhood, with remainder to Henry Lloyd of 
Llanllawthog, esq., sergeant at law, John Vaughan of 
Derllys, esq., James Philipps, gent, (testator's brother 
in law), and Richard Philipps and Nathaniel Morgan, 
gentn. (testator's cousins), on trust for his eldest son 
Jonathan Scurlocke for his life, with remainder to his 
sons in tail, with similar remainders in succession to David 
Scurlocke, Alexander Scurlocke, Griffith Scurlocke, and 
Theophilus Scurlocke (the second, third, fourth, and 
fifth sons respectively of the said testator), with re- 



Scurlock of Carmarthen. 143 

mainder to the daughters of his son Jonathan. To his 
three youngest sons he bequeathed £200 each when they 
were 21 years of age, and he requested his wife Hester 
to ' put his son David to Oxford until he takes a degree 
in arts.' To his daughter Hester Scurlock he bequeathed 
£300, but to his daughter Elizabeth (wife of William 
Bevan of Glasfryn) he gave only los., and mentioned 
as a reason for this that he had been put to great expense 
in maintaining her and her husband and children since 
their marriage. The issue from the marriage of John 
Scurlocke, junior, and Hester his wife was : — 

1. Jonathan Scurlocke, eldest son, born on 21 Jan., 

i6go. 

2. Rev. David Scurlocke. 

3. Alexander Scurlocke, who married Hester WoUey. 

A licence for the marriage to be celebrated at St. 
Peter's Church was obtained on 7 Jan., 1735, 
but the register of that church has no record of 
the marriage. Hester Scurlocke predeceased her 
husband Alexander Scurlocke, and was buried on 
28 Feb., 1737, at St. Peter's Church. She 
appears to have had no children, as by her will 
dated 20 Feb., 1737, and proved at Carmarthen 
on 31 Mar., 1737, she devised the reversion of 
her realty, which had been settled by her marriage 
settlement dated 9 July, 1736, on her husband for 
his life, to trustees to raise thereon £300 (to pay 
off a charge of that amount on the estate of her 
sister Margaret Clynpatell, created by an in- 
denture dated 5 Jan., 1733, and also to raise a 
further sum of £100 to pay off the debts of herself 
and her sister) with remainder to her sister lycttice 
Wolley for her life, with remainder to her (Lettice's) 
sons in tail, with remainder to testatrix's sister, 
Mary Eaton, and her issue. Alexander Scurlock, 
married as his second wife, Martha the widow of 
John Williams of Bwlchygwynt, co. Carmarthen. 



144 Scurlock of Carmarthen. 

4. Griffith Scurlocke, who matriculated at Jesus College, 

Oxford, on i Mar., 1717, aged 17 years. 

5. Theophilus Scurlocke, who was buried at St. Peter's, 

Carmarthen, on 26 May, 1739, and by his will 
dated 30 Jan. 1739, and proved at Carmarthen 
on 25 Aug., 1739, bequeathed all his personalty 
and a farm called Wern Wen in the parish of 
Llangunnor, to his brother Alexander Scurlocke, 
and his nephew William Bevan of Glasfryn. 

6. Elizabeth Scurlocke, who married William Bevan 

of Glasfryn, co. Carmarthen. 

7. Hester Scurlocke. 

David Scurlocke (son of John Scurlocke, junior, and 
Hester his wife) matriculated at Jesus College on 27 Oct., 
1710, being then 16 years of age. The name of his wife 
is not known, but his children were as follows : — 

1. David Scurlocke, junior. 

2. John Scurlock. 

3. Trevor Scurlock. 

4. Jonathan Scurlock. 

5. Griffith Scurlock. 

6. Wilhelmina Charlotte Scurlock, who married Rev. 

Richard Wilmot. 

7. Anna Maria Scurlock, who married David Newland. 

David Scurlocke, junior (son of the Rev. David Scur- 
locke, senior), matriculated at Jesus College, Oxford, on 
22 Mar., 1755, aged 18 years. He married Jane the 
daughter of Thomas Philipp of Cilgunnydd. He died at 
Lovehill House near Windsor on 9 May, 1793, and was 
survived by his wife who died in 1829. Their children 
were : — 

1. John Trevor Scurlock, who died in 1863. 

2. Elizabeth Charlotte Scurlocke, who died in 1862. 

3. Harriet Scurlocke, who died in 1816. 

4. I^ouisa Scurlocke, who died in 1861. 



Scourfield of New Moat. 



By FRANCIS GREEN. 



The Scourfields of New Moat, according to Lewis 
Dwnn's Visitation, came from Westmoreland to 
Pembrokeshire, and arrived in that county at a very 
early date. There are several pedigrees of the family in 
existence, and various discrepancies occur in them in the 
earlier generations. The pedigree in the Peniarth MS. 
No. 156^ starts on the male line with Sir John Scourfield, 
knt., who married INIargaret the daughter of Sir Thomas 
Green, knt., but on the female line with Clovis the Great, 
king of France, and traces from that monarch through 
William de Valence, earl of Pembroke, to Mary the wife 
of Sir Thomas Green, knt. In the Visitation of Lewis 
Dwnn there are two pedigrees of the famil}^, which we 
will in this article refer to as Pedigree No I.^ and Pedigree 
No. 11.^ respectively, the last mentioned document being 
signed b}^ ' John Schourthewyld ' on 14 Oct., 1591.* 
Pedigree No. I. commences with Sir Fulke Scourfield of 
Kendal, co. Westmoreland, who married Jane the daughter 
of Sir John Vere, earl of Oxford, and had issue. Sir John 
Scourfield of Kendal. He married (according to Pedigree 
No. I.) Mareta the daughter of Sir Thomas Green of 
Kendal, knt., and by her had a son, William Scourfield, 
who is stated to have married Elizabeth the daughter and 
heiress of Robert Wiard, and widow of Sir John Herle, 
and by her had a son named John. This John married 
Jane the daughter of Harry Howell ap Philip Vychan, 
and had issue a son named Jenkin Scourfield. 

On the other hand. Pedigree No. II. begins with 

1 West Wales Hist. Records, Vol. II., p. 65. 

^ Lewis Dwnn, Vol. I., p. no. 

' Ibid., p. 175. 

* The New Style of the year has been adopted throughout this article. 

J 



146 Scour field of New Moat. 

John Scourfield of Mote, esq., called the ' bearded,' 
who was descended from Sir Fulke Scourfield, knt. 
This John Scourfield is stated to have married Joan 
the daughter and coheir of John Joce of Prendergast, 
by whom he had a son John Scourfield of Mote, who 
by his wife Annes had a son named Jenkin Scourfield. 

From this point the two pedigrees agree fairly well 
as to the main line of the family. This Jenkin Scour- 
field married Maud (or Jane according to Pedigree 
No. I.) the daughter of Jankin or John Brochd^^n, lord 
of Wlbri, and had a son. Piers Scourfield,^ described 
as of j\Iote, who married Jane or Alson the daughter of 
Richard Johns^ of Haverfordwest. The issue from the 
marriage of Piers Scourfield and his wife was : — 

1. Harry Scourfield. 

2. John Scourfield. 

3. Thomas Scourfield, probably the person of that 

name described as of Lochmeiler, gent., who in 
1565 was sued by John Lewys Perkyn of Caerwen, 
in the parish of Llandeloy, co. Pembroke, for £11 
due on a bond. 

4. Richard Scourfield. 

5. A daughter who married John Tasker. 

6. A daughter who married John Rickart of Posty. 

7. A daughter who married Jenkin ap Rhydderch of 

Kenarth, co. Carmarthen. 

8. Elizabeth Scourfield who married .... Perceival. 

Harry Scourfield^ (son of Piers Scourfield) resided at 

1 In the Plea Rolls for co. Pem. his name is given as Peter Scourfield. 

2 Pedigree No. II. says William Johns of Treowen, standard 
bearer to Hen. VII. ; he was the father of Richard Johnes. 

3 In the Bulkeley Philipps' Collection of Pedigrees of the Phillipps' 
Family, the following curious incident is given in connection with the 
wife of Harry Scourfield of Mote : — ' Morgan Philipps of Picton Castle, 
esq., married (i) Anne daughter of Richard Morris of Castle Villia, co. 
Pembroke, esq., and supposed widow of Henry Scourfield of Mote, esq. 
By her Morgan Phillips had a daughter Elizabeth, who married Thomas 
ap Eynon of Castle Gorvod, esq. Henry Scourfield returning home 
after a long captivity in Barbary, where he was supposed to have died, 
his wife returned to him.' It seems clear that story applied not to 
Harry Scourfield but to his son William Scourfield, who, as will be seen 
above, married Ann the daughter of Richard Morris. 



Scourfield of New Moat. 147 

Mote. He married twice, one of his wives — the order of 
their precedence is unknown — being Joan the daughter 
of Thomas ap Owen of Trelloyn in the parish of Penally, 
CO Pembroke, by whom he had two daughters, respec- 
tively named Joan and Jane. His other wife was Ethe- 
dreda the daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Butler^ 
(son of John Butler of Coedcenlas, co. Pembroke, by his 
wife Ivcttice the daughter of John Sutton), and her chil- 
dren were : — 

1. John Scourfield. 

2. William Scourfield of Castle Villia in the parish of 

BrsLwdy, co. Pembroke. He married Ann the 
daughter and heiress of Richard Morris by his wife 
Katherine Wogan.^ This William Scourfield was 
with his brother Richard a witness in a suit in 
1572 brought against Lewis Harries, the mayor of 
Haverfordwest, in w'hich the question of the 
boundary between the town of Haverfordwest and 
Prendergast parish was involved. According to 
the evidence, they with Morris Scourfield^ of 
Mote, were having a drink in the alehouse of one 
William Berrein, when a quarrel arose, and a 
man named Watts threw a piece of cheese at 
another named Strong, who promptly drew his 
dagger to attack him. Richard Scourfield and 
others dis-armed Watts, but with a view of getting 
rid of him returned the dagger to him. William 
Scourfield then followed Watts to tr}^ and persuade 
him to make friends with Strong, but Watts 
again drew his dagger and wounded the peace- 
maker.^ 



1 Pedigree No. I. and the Chetham MSS. state that Ethedreda 
was the daughter of Thomas Butler of Trecadwgan in the parish of 
Whitchurch in Dewisland, by his wife Beaton, the daughter of John 
Sutton. 

2 Chetham MSS. No. 97- 

3 Brother of William and Richard Scourfield. 

* For a fuller account of this incident see Arch. Camb., Ser. V., Vol. 
XIII., p. 209. 



148 Scourfield of New Moat. 

William Scourfield and his wife Ann were defend- 
ants in a fine levied of three messuages and 140 
acres oUand in Rudbaxton on 13 Sept., 1563. He 
died on* 20 Oct., 1592,^ and his wife on 10 June, 
1582, the issue from their marriage being : — {a) a 
son named John who married Jane the daughter 
of Llewellin Lloid, the son of Morgan Lloid, and 
by her had an only daughter and heiress named 
Anne ; (b) William Scourfield. John (son of Wil- 
liam Scourfield and Anne lyloid) died in May, 
1588 at Castle Villia, his daughter Anne being then 
only 8 years of age. Now John Scourfield had 
inherited from his mother Anne a messuage and 
two carucates^ of land in Castle Villia, which was 
held of John ap Rice, esq.,^ as of his manor of 
Tancardston, and in consequence of his daughter 
Anne Scourfield being an infant, her marriage was 
claimed by John ap Rice as lord of the manor. 
Her relatives, however, did not acquiesce in this 
and the young lady disappeared, with the result 
that John ap Rice sued John Scourfield of Moat, 
esq., and John Meyler of Trewalter in the parish 
of Mathry for abducting her on i Nov., 1592.* 
Unfortunately we are not told how the matter 
ended. 

3. I^ewis Scourfield. 

4. Richard Scourfield. 

5. James Scourfield, who married Elizabeth Lewis, 

and had issue two sons named John and Harry. 

6. Thomas Scourfield, who married and had two sons, 

John and Harry .^ 

7. Maud Scourfield, who married Owen Tankard of 

Dudwell in the parish of Camrose. 



1 Chatham MSS., No. 97. 

2 A carucate or ploughland was 64 acres. 

3 Of Richardston in the parish of Brawdy. 
* Pembrokeshire Plea Rolls, No. 63. 

^ Pembrokeshire Plea Rolls, No. 98. 



Scourfield of New Moat. 149 

8. Jane Scourfield, who married Thomas Tucker of 

Sealyham in the parish of St. Dogwells. 

9. Ellen Scourfield of St. Dogwells. 

John Scourfield (son of Harry Scourfield and Ethedreda 
his wife) married Katherine the daughter of Sir John 
Wogan of Wiston, by his wife Ann Phillip of Stonehall, 
CO. Pembroke.^ He died on 16 Jan. 1593, and his 
wife Katherine on 2 Aug. 1587. Their issue was : — 

1. John Scourfield, junior. 

2. Harry Scourfield, who according to Pedigree No. 

II., had no issue, save an illegitimate daughter 
named Katherine. He was probably the Henry 
Scourfield of Bletherston, who in 1604 was sued 
by Phillip Saunders for £8 due on a bond. 

3. James Scourfield, who married Margaret, daughter 

of Jenkin Vawer of Haverfordwest. His will at 
the Carmarthen Probate Court is so decayed 
that very little information can be obtained from 
it. He apparently left all his goods in Haverford- 
west to Ethelred Wogan for his life, and mentions 
' my youngest daughter Margaret Scourfield, my 
eldest son Thomas Scourfield, and my God- 
daughter Catherine, the daughter of Thomas 
Scourfield.' The date of the will and probate has 
gone, but the will is endorsed 1614. It is possible 
that this Thomas Scourfield was the person who 
married Margaret the widow of Richard Bowen 
of Lochmeiler, and died on 20 July, 1658. 

4. Jane Scourfield, the wife of Morgan John, lord of 

Tow^m. 

5. Anne Scourfield, the wife of William Griffiths of 

Tressissillt in the parish of Granston, gent. Their 
marriage settlement was dated 22 July, 1578,^ 
and by it William Griffiths settled his capital 
messuage called Tressissillt, and the moiety of a 

1 See West Wales Hist. Records, Vol. VI., p. 198. 

2 Papers of the Great Sessions for 7 Jac. I. 



150 Scourfield of New Moat. 

tenement in Trehowell and Priskarn in the parish 
of Llanunda, to the use of himself and his wife 
Ann Scourfield for their lives, with remainder to 
their issue. 

6. Elizabeth Scourfield/ who married Harry Johns of 

Southfield in the parish of Camrose. 

7. Jane Scourfield, wife of Philip ap James. ^ 

8. Elizabeth Scourfield, wife of John Eynon.^ 

9. Mary Scourfield, wife of Owen ap leuan ap Jenkin. 
10. Ellen Scourfield, wife of David Reiad.^ 

John Scourfield, junior (son of John Scourfield and 
Katherine Wogan his wife), married Katherine the 
daughter and heiress of Richard ap Owen ap Richard 
of Lochmeiler in the parish of Llandeloy. Beyond that 
he was sheriff for co. Pembroke in 1600, little is known 
of him. He died in the early part of 1610, his will being 
dated 26 Dec, 1609, and proved at Carmarthen on 24 
April following. B}^ it he devised the fee farm of the 
rectory of Newmoat (bought from Sir Thomas Shereley, 
knt.) to his eldest son William Scourfield in fee tail 
male, with similar remainders in succession to his (testa- 
tor's) 3^ounger sons. John Scourfield the ^^oungest son 
of the testator was at that time under age, and his father 
directed that he was to be kept at his books, and be- 
queathed him £200 when he came of age. No mention 
is made of the testator's wife in the will, so presumably 
she predeceased her husband. According to Lewis Dwnn,^ 
John Scourfield had an illegitimate son named John. 
The children of John Scourfield, junior, by his wife 
Katherine Richard, were : — 

1. William Scourfield (eldest son). 

2. Thomas Scourfield, who married Ann the daughter 

and heiress of William of Castle Velin.^ 

3. Harry Scourfield, to whom his father bequeathed 

£200. 

1 Lewis Dwnn, Vol. I., p. 176. 
* Vol. I., p. 176. 



Scour field of New Moat. 151 

4. John Scourfield. 

5. Margaret Scourfield (eldest daughter), to whom her 

father bequeathed ;^200. 

6. Dorothy Scourfield, who married George ap Owen 

of Llwyngvvrwr.^ 

7. Catherine Scourfield (third daughter), to whom her 

father bequeathed £100. 

8. lyettice Scourfield, who married Richard Vaughan 

of Bryn.2 

9. Elizabeth Scourfield (youngest daughter), to whom 

her father bequeathed £100. 

10. Anne Scourfield. 

William Scourfield (son of John Scourfield, junior, by 
his wife Katherine Richard) was sheriff for co. Pembroke 
in 1617, and married Jane the daughter of George Owen, 
lord of Kemes, the Elizabethan historian of Pembroke- 
shire. 

So far we have been much in the dark as to the extent 
of property in Pembrokeshire owned by the Scourfield 
family, but an inquisition held on 10 Aug., 1622, on the 
death of William Scourfield gives us some interesting 
information on the point. This inquisition was held before 
Thomas Cannon, feodary of the count3^ William David, 
esq., George Owen, gent., and Lewis Johnes, gent., 
escheator for co. Pembroke. The jury consisted of James 
Vaughan of Pontvane, gent., John Tucker of St. Dog- 
wells, gent., Llewellin Harry of Tregwynt, gent., Maurice 
Grifliths of Tregindeg, gent., John S^'-mins of Martell, 
gent., Griffith Thomas of Llandilo, gent., Nicholas Hurd 
of Crundall, gent., John Smith of He^^thock, Lewis Howell 
of Lampiter Velfrey, Thomas ap Owen of Llanykeven, 
John Colby of Bletherston, Llewellin William of Peny- 
park, Owen Roblin of Talybont, Jenkin David of Poysty, 
and Rees Reynold of Lh'syvrane, who returned that the 

1 Llwyngwair. 2 Lewis Dwnn Vol. i, p. 176. 



152 Scour field of New Moat. 

said William Scourfield was seised in demesne as of fee 
of the following property : — 

The rectory of New Moate held of the king as of his manor of East 
Greenwich/ of the clear annual value of 40s. 

Three messuages and 11 bovates^ of land in the town and fields of 
Widdeston^ in Rouse, held of the prince of Wales, as of his manor of 
Staynton, by knight's service, being of the clear annual value of 33s. 4d. 

One-fourth part of the manor of Honyborough held of the prince of 
Wales as of his lordship of Haverfordwest by knight's service, being 
of the clear annual value of 3s. 4d. 

One-sixth part of a corn mill in Great Honyborough,* held of the 
prince of Wales as of his lordship of Haverfordwest, by knight's service, 
being of the clear annual value of 3s. 4d. 

Two messuages and 6 bovates of land in Little Honyborough,* held 
of the manor of Great Honyborough* by knight's service, being of the 
clear annual value of 3s. 4d. 

2\ burgages and a parcel of land in Tenby, held of the manor of 
Pembroke in free socage, being of the clear annual value of 3s. 4d. 

The capital mansion house of the said William Scourfield and 5 
carucates of land at New Mote and five messuages called Vordland,* 
Parkeast,* ForehUl,® and Stranger's Landes, containing 5 carucates of 
land at New Mote, held of William, bishop of St. Davids, as of his 
manor of New Mote in free socage, being of the clear annual value of 

IOCS. 

Four messuages and certain lands containing 4 carucates called 
Rhynkenies,' Varbenshooke,® and Honyhooke, and a corn mill and a 
fulling mill in Varbenshooke, held of the bishop of St. Davids as of his 
manor of New Mote by knight's service, being of the clear annual 
value of 23s. 4d. ^ 

A messuage called Ffynongainge' and Wilsbutt, and two carucates 
of land and three messuages and three carucates of land in the tovim of 
Bletherston, held of the bishop of St. Davids by free socage, as of his 
barony of Llawhaden, being of the clear annual value of 40s. 

A messuage and 20 acres of land in Perceli,^" held of the bishop of 
St. Davids by knight's service, as of his manor of Castle Morris, being 
of the clear annual value of 3s. 4d. 

1 CO. Kent. 

2 A bovate or oxland was 8 Welsh acres. 

3 Woodston in the parish of Staynton. 

* In the parish of Llanstadwell. 

* Forland in the parish of New Moat. 

* In the parish of New Moat. 
' Possibly Rhydybrowin. 

8 Farthings Hook. 

* In the parish of New Moat. 

1" Either Priskilly in the parish of Mathry, or Parcely in the parish of St. 
Edrens. 



Scour field of New Moat. 153 

A messuage and 100 acres of land and a corn mill in Castle Villia 
and Rhoskynevin" (which the said William Scourfield purchased from 
Thomas Scourfield and Anne his wife, and Thomas Rees, esq., by an 
indenture dated 20 July, 1615), held of the bishop of St. Davids by 
knight's service, as of his manor of Pebidiawke, otherwise Dewisland, 
being of the clear value annual of 30s. 

The manor of Llanvuron' in the parish of Llanunda, a messuage, 
two carucates of land and a corn mill in Lochmeiler, and a messuage 
and 10 acres of land in Llandeloy, a messuage and 10 acres of land in 
Trevervin in the parish of St. Davids, a messuage and 10 acres of land 
in Llandeloy, a messuage and certain acres of land in TrenichoU, and a 
messuage and 8 acres of land in Trelethydvawr,* all held of the bishop 
of St. Davids in free socage, as of his manor of Pebydiawke. being of 
the clear annual value of 50s. 

Seven messuages and two carucates of land in the fown of Clarbeston, 
and 2s. 2d. of yearly rent from a messuage of Thomas Restance in the 
town of Clarbeston, held of John Philippes, bart., by knight's service, 
as of his manor of Mountjoy, otherwise Clarbeston, being of the clear 
annual value of 30s. 

A messuage and certain lands in Trecysillt and Penyrhiw Vach in 
the parish of Llanunda, and a messuage and lands at Goodigg in the 
parish of Llanunda, held of John Owen, gent., in free socage, as of 
his manor of Trecycillt, being of the clear annual value of 5s. 

Lands in Llanvaire Kynon and Llandyrnevrane* held of David 
Lloyd, gent., by knight's service, as of his manor of Llanrian, being 
of the clear annual value of los. 

Two messuages and half a carucate of land in Kerbettt^ and Tre- 
glemes.'held of John Wogan, knt., by knight's service, as of his manor 
of Treglemes, otherwise Came Vawre, being of the annual value of 
los. 

A messuage and 20 acres of land in Lochtyrfin,* and 30 acres of land 
in Gweme y Parry,* held of Hugh Owen by knight's service, as of his 
manor of Castlekenlas,* being of the annual value of los. 

A messuage and 12 acres of land in Tretheogg^" held of William 
Wogan, gent., by knight's service, as of his manor of Tretheogg, being 
of the annual value of 6s. 8d. 



1 In the parish of Llandeloy. 

2 Probably Rhoscrannog in the parish of Llandeloy. 

3 Llanferran. 

* In the parish of St. Davids. 
^ Goodwick. 

« Llanvirn Eynon and Llanvimyfran in the parish of St. Davids. 
' In the parish of Llanhowell. 

* In the parish of Mathry. 

* Waun y barry in the parish of Mathry. 
1* In the parish of St. Edrens. 



154 Scourfield of New Moat. 

A garden in the town of Harrysmote, held of Alban Owen, esq., 
by knight's service, as of his lordship of Kernes, being of the clear 
annual value of 2s. 

A messuage and 60 acres of mountain land called Mynithduw, being 
of the clear annual value of los., but as to its tenure the jury were 
ignorant, 

Four messuages and two cottages in Haverfordwest, held of the 
prince of Wales in free socage, as of his lordship of Haverfordwest, 
being of the clear annual value of los. 

The jurors further returned that the said William 
Scourfield died on 22 Mar., 1622, and that John Scour- 
field his son and heir was of the age of 15 years 3 months 
and 20 days at the date of his father's death. 

After the death of her husband William Scourfield, 
his widow Jane married John Philipps of Ffynnongain, 
and in 1631, she and her husband sued her son John 
Scourfield at the Great Sessions for a one-third share of 
60 messuages and 5000 acres of land, a corn mill, and a 
fulling mill in Newmote, Blether ston, Clarbeston, Mathry, 
St. Davids, Wiston, Mynwear, Llanstadwell, Steinton, 
lylandeloy, Brawdy, Llanrheithan, St. Edrins, Llanunda, 
Nevern, Llanhowell, Llanrhian, and Haverfordwest, as 
dower from her late husband William Scourfield.^ The 
children of William Scourfield by his wife Jane Owen 
were as follows : — 

1. John Scourfield. 

2. Ellen Scourfield. 

3. Katherine Scourfield. 

4. Margaret Scourfield.^ 

5. Jane Scourfield.^ 

John Scourfield (son of William Scourfield by his wife 
Jane) was born in 1607. He married Mary the daughter 
of Sir John Philipps of Picton Castle. He was sheriff for 
CO. Pembroke in 1635, and in that year he went to London 
to pay over to the Privy Council ;^43 which was the 

1 Papers of the Great Sessions, 6 Car. I. 

2 Papers of the Great Sessions, 5 Car. I. 



Scour field of New Moat. 155 

arrears of Ship Money assessed on the county. While 
crossing Enshani Ferry in co. Oxford, he was drowned, 
and the Ship Money lost in the river. ^ He was thus 
only about 28 years of age when he died. After his 
death his wife Mary married Arthur Owen the son of 
Sir Hugh Owen of Orielton. The issue from the marriage 
of John Scourfield to his wife Jane Philipps was : — 

1. William Scourfield. 

2. Other children, of whom details are lacking. 

William Scourfield (son of John Scourfield and his wife 
Jane Philipps) was sherift' for co. Pembroke in 1663. 
He married ]\Iary the daughter of Sir Hugh Owen of 
Orielton, and she predeceased him on 19 Mar., 1693, at 
the age of 50 years. Her husband died three years later, 
his will dated 25 Sept., 1695, having been proved at 
Carmarthen on 20 Feb., 1696. By it he charged the 
family estate, under a power contained in his marriage 
settlement, with a sum of £1000 in favour of his daughters 
Mary, Katherine, and Dorothy Scourfield, spinsters, and 
also charged his lands in cos. Pembroke and Haverford- 
west with a legacy of £666 13s. 4d. to each of his daughters 
Mary and Katharine, and of £566 13s. 4d. to his daughter 
Doroth3^ Subject to these charges, he devised all his 
realty and personalty to his son William Scourfield. 
His children William and Dorothy were then under 
age, so he appointed his brother-in-law Sir Hugh Owen, 
bart., his brother [? in law] John Owen of Trecoon, 
esq., and his kinsman John Laugharne of Llandawke, co. 
Carmarthen, to be their guardians during their minority. 
In the inventory of his effects, the total value of which 
was £777 I2s. lo^d., appear the following interesting 
items : — A silver tankard, a basin, a salver, a silver gilt 
salt, two small salts, a dozen spoons, three castors, and 
a spoon and a cup, £34 ; pewter dishes and plates, £5 los. 

^ State Papers for 1636. 



156 Scourfield of New Moat. 

The following were the children of William Scourfield 
by his wife Mary Owen : — 

1. William Scourfield, junior. 

2. Mary Scourfield (eldest daughter) who died un- 

married, and by her will dated 15 June, 1719, 
and proved at Carmarthen on 7 April, 1726, be- 
queathed to her sister Catherine Meare, widow, 
certain rings, and to her sister's son Hugh Meare, 
£100 and a silver cup with a cover. She gave to 
her brother William Scourfield, junior, and his 
wife, two guineas to buy rings, and appointed her 
sister Dorothy Phillips of Longridge as her residu- 
ary legatee. 

3. Katharine (second daughter), who married George 

Meares of Eastington in the parish of Rhoscrow- 
ther. 

4. Dorothy Scourfield, who married as her first husband 

William Skryme of Longridge in the parish of 
Bletherston, and, as her second husband, Charles 
Phillipps of Haythog, co. Pembroke. 

William Scourfield, junior (son of William and Mary 
Scourfield), was sheriff for co. Pembroke in 1699. He 
married Katherine the daughter and co-heiress of Griffith 
Hawkwell of Haverfordwest, esq., and the issue from 
that marriage was : — 

1. William Scourfield. 

2. Anne Scourfield, who married as her first husband, 

Thomas Lloyd of Cwmgloyne in the parish of 
Bayvil, and as her second husband, Robert 
Gosnel. 

3. Katherine Scourfield, 

4. Judith Scourfield. 

5. Mary Scourfield. 

An interesting suit was brought in the Great Sessions 
for CO. Pembroke in the 13th year of Queen Anne, touch- 
ing burial rights in the church of Llandeloy. The suit 



Scourfield of New Moat. 157 

was brought by John James, the tenant of Lochmeiler in 
that parish, gent., against EHzabeth Prichard of the 
same parish, spinster, who was the lessee of the tithes 
of Llandeloy. The plea in the suit stated that William 
Scourfield was tenant for life of Lochmeiler, with remain- 
der to his heirs male, and that the chancel of Llandeloy 
Church belonged to him and to all occupiers of Loch- 
meiler, who had a right to worship in the church and to 
be buried there without pa3"ing los. or any other fee to 
the rector of the parish. It further stated that the 
chancel or isle had been repaired by William Scourfield, 
and that the parents of John James had been buried in 
the isle and not in the chancel, and Elizabeth Prichard 
had tried to compel James to pay los. for each burial. 
James refused to pay up, and she summoned him before 
the bishop's court, called the Court of Christianity. 
Here the bishop refused to accept the plea of James, 
who issued a writ of the Queen against Elizabeth Prichard. 
She, however, continued to prosecute him in the Court 
of Christianity, alleging that the burials were made in 
the chancel and not in the isle. Then James sued her 
in the Great Sessions for £100 damages.^ The result of 
the trial is not given in the document. 

William Scourfield (son of William Scourfield, junior, 
and Katherine Hawkwell his wife) married Ann the 
daughter of William Pliilipps, the Recorder of Brecon. 
Their children were : — 

1. Henry Scourfield. 

2. Francis Scourfield. 

3. Mary Scourfield. 

Henry Scourfield (son of William Scourfield and his 
wife Ann Philipps) resided at Robeston Hall in the parish 
of Robeston West, co. Pembroke. He was sherifi' for co. 
Pembroke in 1781, and married^ Elizabeth the daughter 



1 Papers of the Great Sessions for 13 Anne. 

2 Their prenuptial settlement is dated 27 Feb.. 1771. 



158 Scourfield of New Moat. 

of Dr. John Ewer, bishop of Bangor, and canon of Wind- 
sor. She died ^ in 1790, and by her he had the following 
children : — 

1. William Henry Scourfield. 

2. Mar}- Scourfield, who in 1799 married Rev. Joshua 

Rowley of East Bergholt, co. Suffolk, the son of 
Admiral Sir Joshua Rowley, bart.^ 

3. Elizabeth Anne Scourfield, who married Col. Owen 

Phillips the son of Rev. John Phillips, D.D., of 
Williamston in the parish of Burton. 

William Henry Scourfield (son of Henry Scourfield 
and Elizabeth his wife) was sheriff for co. Pembroke in 
1812, and M.P. for Haverfordwest in 1818 and 1835. 
He married as his first wife, Maria the daughter of Lieut. 
Col. Goat of Bent Ely Hall, Suffolk.^ She died on 20 
Aug., 1835, ill tis^ 53rd. year,^ and he afterwards married 
at Manorowen on 28 Dec, 1837, Louisa the daughter 
of Richard Bo wen of Manorowen. There was no issue 
from either of the marriages, and on his death on 31 
Jan., 1843, at the age of 65 years, the direct line of the 
ancient family of Scourfield of New Moat came to an end. 
The family estate under his will vested in his sister 
Mary Rowley for her life, and thereafter in his nephew 
John Henry Phillips, who was sheriff for co. Pembroke 
in 1833, and in 1862 assumed the name and arms of 
Scourfield by royal licence. 



1 Gent. Magazine. 

2 Allen's Sheriffs of Pembrokeshire, p. 60. 

3 Inscription at New Moat Church. 



Marriage Bonds of West Wales 
and Gower. 

Continued from Vol. VIII., p. 240. 



1784. 

Jan. 3. Robert Mansel, gent., and Judith Jenkins, spinster, both of 
the parish of Kidwelly, Carms.^ 

Jan. 7. Thomas Davies of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, yeo- 
man, and Priscilla Griffiths of the parish of Lantharog, 
Carms., spinster.^ 

Jan. II. David Philip, yeoman, and Lucy Thomas, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lanboidy, Carms. ^ 

Jan. 12. Evan Lewis, yeoman, and Anne Davies, widow, both of the 
parish of Abernant, Carms.^ 

Jan. 16. John Harry of the parish of Lanfynidd, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jane John of the parish of Landilofawr, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ 

Jan. 16. Humphrey Thomas, yeoman, and Margaret Morris, widow, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Jan. 24. WiUiam Raymond, gent., and Dianah Evans, spinster, both 
of the parish of Laugh ame, Carms. ^ 

Jan. 28. Edward Howell, yeoman, and Anne Thomas, spinster, both 
of the parish of Newchurch, Carms.'^ 

Jan. 31. David Davies of the parish of Landeveylog, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Anne Evans of the parish of Langendeim, Carms., 
spinster.^ 

Feb. 2. Richard Griffiths, yeoman, and Mary Jones, spinster, both 
of the parish of Langendeim, Carms. ■^ 

Feb. 3. Thomas Gwyne of the parish of Llangohnan, Perns., gent., 
and Anne Nicholas of the parish of Manachlogdeu, Pems., 
spinster. ■*■ 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



i6o 




Feb. 


3- 


Feb. 


5- 


Feb. 


7- 


Mar. 


14 


Mar. 


22 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 

William Roderick of the parish of Lanclevyson, Carms., 
gent., and Sarah Jones of the parish of Langathen, Carms., 
spinster.^ 

Benjamin Ballard of the parish of Lanbleidian, Glam., gent., 
and Elisabeth Price of the parish of Landilovawr, spinster.^ 

James Davies of the parish of Henllan Amgoed, Carms., 
yeoman, and Anne Thomas of the parish of Lanboidy, 
Carms., spinster.^ 

John Morgan and Grace Thomas, Swansea." 

William Hughes, yeoman, and Mary Collins, widow, both 
of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Mar. 27. William Price of the parish of Eglwyscummia, Carms., 
yeoman, and Mary James of the parish of Pendine, Carms. , 
spinster.^ 

Mar. 29. John Williams of the parish of Langathen, Carms., gent., 
and Jane Beynon of the parish of Landilofawr, Carms., 
spinster.^ 

John Owen, yeoman, and Joanna Bevan, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lanon, Carms. ^ 

Evan Hopkin of the parish of Llanfihangel Aberbythick, 
Carms., yeoman, and Anne Lake of the parish of Llandebie, 
Carms., spinster.^ 

James Howell, mariner, and Elisabeth Lewis, spinster, both 
of the parish of Laugharne, Carms.'^ 

David Lloyd of the parish of Conwilgaio, Carms., gent., and 
Jane Williams of the parish of Kilycoomb, Carms., spinster.' 

Chauncey Davies, gent., and Grace Roch, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Mary, Haverfordwest.' 

John David, yeoman, and Elisabeth Dunn, spinster, both 
of the parish of Langendeirn, Carms.' 

Joseph Williams of the parish of Hubberston, Pems., yeo- 
man, and Elizabeth Knight of the parish of St. Ishmael, 
Perns., spinster.' 

May 19. William Daniel of the parish of Lanfynidd, Carms., yeoman, 
and Bridget Lewis of the parish of Landilofawr, Carms., 
spinster.' 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

2 This, with other similar brief entries, is written on a sheet of paper 
deposited amongst the marriage bonds. 



Mar. 


SI- 


Apr. 


S- 


Apr. 


IS- 


Apr. 


21. 


May 


4- 


May 


15- 


May 


18. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 161 

May 26. Evan Simon, yeoman, and Mary David, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lanvihangel Rhos-y-Corn, Carms."^ 

May 29. William Thomas of the parish of Llanboidy, Carms., gent., 
and Mary Howells of the parish of Llanstephan, Carms., 
widow/ 

Jmi. 3. William Rees, farmer, and Margaret John, spinster, both of 
the parish of Conwilgaio, Carms. ^ 

Jxm. 7. John Jones of the parish of Pontypool, co. Mon., gent., and 
Margaret Davies of the parish of Llangathen, Carms., spin- 
ster. 

Jun. 8. David Thomas of the parish of Llanllawthog, Carms., 
fanner, and Mary Jones of the parish of Llanlloony, Carms., 
spinster.^ 

Jun. 28. Lewis Miles and Martha Hopkin, Swansea.* 

Jun. 29. Walter Bonnel of the parish of Langain, Carms., yeoman, 
and Anne Thomas of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
spinster.^ 

Jul. I. Thomas Maency and Margaret Jervis, Swansea.* 

Jul. I. Benjamin Davies, gent., and Alice Landag, spinster, both of 
the parish of Langevelach, Glam.^ 

Jul. 3. John Williams, mariner, and Margaret Morris, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Jul. 8. Daniel Morgan of the parish of Lanelly, Carms., yeoman, 
and Margaret Powell of the parish of Lanon, Carms., widow. ^ 

Jul. 8. John Williams of the parish of Kellan, Cards., yeoman, and 
Mary Moses of the parish of Conwilgaio, Carms., spinster.* 

Jul. 9. Thomas Jones of the parish of Llansawel, Carms., yeoman, 
and Letitia Thomas of the parish of Llangathen, Carms., 
spinster.* 

Jul. 12. Samuel Harris of the parish of St. Davids, Pems., gent., and 
Mary Williams of the parish of Bletherston, Pems., spinster.* 

Jul. 12. James Orriel, yeoman, and Margaret Rhode, spinster, both 
of the parish of Marros, Carms.* 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

* This, with other similar brief entries, is written on a sheet of paper 
deposited amongst the marriage bonds. 
' Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 

K 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 

John Evans, yeoman, and Mary David, spinster, both of the 
parish of Conwilgaio, Carms.^ 

Benjamin Thomas, farmer, and Sarah Morris, spinster, both 
of the parish of Idanwiaio, Carms.^ 

David Thomas of the parish of Langlydwen, Carms., yeoman, 
and Catharine Rees of the parish of Manachlog-ddu, Pems., 
spinster.^ 

William James, farmer, and Martha James, widow, both of 
the parish of Llandissilio, Carms. ^ 

Thomas Clement of the parish of Greenwich, co. Kent, gent., 
and Mary James of the parish of Lansawel, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ 

Josiah LewelUn, gent., and Elisabeth Taylcr, spinster, both 
of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Evan Thomas of the parish of Lanfihangel Aberbythick, 
Carms., yeoman, and Elisabeth Price of the parish of Lan- 
arthney, Carms., spinster.-^ 

John Morgan, yeoman, and Mary William, spinster, both of 
the parish of Langadock, Carms. ^ 

David James of the parish of Langain, Carms., yeoman, and 
Mary Evans of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., widow.^ 

David Evan of the parish of Lanpimsaint, Carms., yeoman, 
and Elisabeth Harvard of the parish of Penboir, Carms., 
widow. ^ 

Thomas David, yeoman, and Martha Davies, widow, both 
of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms. ^ 

Rees David of the parish of Lanybyther, Carms., yeoman, 
and Hesther John of the parish of Talley, Carms., spinster, 
a minor ; with the father's consent.^ 

Aug. 12. Thomas David of the parish of Landevyson, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Jane Rudderch of the parish of LandilovawT, 
Carms., spinster.^ 

Aug. 12. Lodowick Lake of the parish of Landebye, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Herbert of the parish of Lanfih angel Aberbythick, 
Carms., spinster.'' 

Aug. 12. Thomas Parry of the parish of Landissilio-gogo, Cards., 
clerk, and Bridget Jones of the parish of LlanUwchaiam, 
Cards., widow.^ 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



162 




Jul. 


14. 


Jul. 


14. 


Jul. 


14. 


Jul. 


20. 


Jul. 


21. 


Jul. 


21. 


Jul. 


24. 


Jul. 


26. 


Aug. 


2. 


Aug. 


7. 


Aug. 


11. 


Aug. 


12. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 163 

Aug. 14. Thomas Davies, yeoman, aud Jane William, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lampeter pont Stephen, Cards., spinster.^ 

Aug. 17. Thomas Evan of the parish of Lanarthncy, Carms., yeoman, 
aud Letticc Thomas of the parish of Landeveylog, Carms., 
spinster.^ 

Aug. 21. George Davies of the parish of Cynwil Elvet, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Mary Thomas of the parish of Landeveylog, 
Carms., widow. ^ 

Aug. 26. William Franklen and Margaret Cragg, Swansea.* 

Aug. 26. John Davies of the parish of Llanginning, Carms., yeoman, 
and Elisabeth Rowlands of the parish of Newport, Pems., 
spinster.^ 

Aug. 28. David Davies of the parish of Kilrhedyn, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Philipps of the parish of Clydeu, Pems., spinster.* 

Sep. 2. Thomas John, yeoman, and Anne George, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lanegwad, Carms. ^ B. by said Thomas John 
and John Williams of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen ; 
witness : John Rogers. 

Sep. 2. Thomas Jones, gent., and Elizabeth Philip, widow, both of 
the parish of Llangunnock, Carms.^ B. by said Thomas 
Jones and Hughes Jones of Carmarthen, yeoman ; witness : 
N. Morgan, notary public. 

Sep. 9. Edward Owens of the parish of Langinning, Carms., yeoman, 
and Elisabeth Davies of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Edward Owen ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
li aias. 

Sep. 10. Thomas Evan, yeoman, and Anne Evans, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lansadum, Carms.^ B. by said Thomas Evan ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 15. John Furlong, gent., and Margaret Thomas, spinster, both 
of the parish of Llampiter Velfrey, Pems.^ B. by said John 
Furlong and Thomas Philipps of the parish of Llanginning, 
Carms., gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 18. Richard Lewis and Elizabeth Davies, Swansea.* 

Sep. 30. WUliam Richard of the parish of Langain Carms. yeoman, 
and Hesther Evan of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said W illiam Richards and William Evans 
of Carmarthen ; witness : Dan. WilHams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

* This, with other similar brief entries, is written on a sheet of paper 
deposited amongst the marriage bonds. 



164 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 

Oct. 4. David Lodowick of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., 
farmer, and Martha Stephen of the parish of Puncheston, 
Perns., spinster.^ B. by said David Ivodowick and Thomas 
Stephens of the parish of Llanegwad, Carms., farmer ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 6. John Webb, gent., and Jane Taylor, spinster, both of the 
parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Oct. 7. Thomas Mathew of the parish of Llandilofawr, Carms., 
yeoman, and Anne Thomas of the parish of Llanvynith, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Mathew ; witness: 
Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 8. Nathaniel Wright, gent., and Grace Jones, spinster, both of 
the parish of Kenarth, Carms. ^ B. by said Nathaniel 
Wright ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 16. William Lewis of the parish of Eglwys Cymmin, Carms., 
yeoman, and Hesther Morris of the parish of Kiffyg, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said William Lewis and Griffith Evans of 
the parish of Llandouror, Carms., clerk ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Oct. 18. William Evans, yeoman, and Mary Morris, widow, both of 
the parish of Llandissilio, Carms.^ B. by said William 
Evans and Richard Lewis of the said parish of Llandissilio, 
farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 18. William Williams, esq., and Dorothy Lewis, spinster, both 
of the parish of Cardigan.^ 

Oct. 20. Rees Morris of the parish of Langathen, Carms., gent., and 
Elisabeth Jones of the parish of Landilofawr, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said Rees Morris. 

Oct. 20. Francis Price, gent., and Rebecca Botting, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanedy, Carms. ^ B. by said Francis Price 
and John Hugh of the parish of Llanon, Carms., farmer ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 20. James Saer, gent., and Margaret Simpson, spinster, both of 
the parish of Laughame, Carms. ^ B. by said James Saer 
and Michael Saer of the said parish of Laughame, gent. 

Oct. 27. Benjamin William of the parish of Lanfynidd, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Catharine David of the parish of Lanegwad, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Benjamin William and Wil- 
liam Edward of the said parish of Llanfynith, farmer ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 
* Fiat issued by John Evans, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 165 

Oct. 29. John Anderson, gent., and Elisabeth Lloyd, spinster, both 
of the parish of Laugharne, Carms.^ B. by said John 
Anderson. 

Oct. 30. William Jones of the parish of Lanfih angel Yeroth, Carms., 
yeoman, and Anne Williams of the parish of Lanwenog, 
Cards., spinster.* B. by said William Jones ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 30. John I.ewellin of the parish of I.anarthney, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Anne Jones ol the parish oi Lanegwad, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said John Lewellin ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Nov. 4. David Evans of the parish of Dihewid, Cards., clerk, and 
Winifred Rogers of the parish of Trevilan, Cards., spinster.* 
B. by said David Evans. 

Nov. 4. David Hughes, yeoman, and Jemima Davies, spinster, both 
of the parish of Trelech, Carms.* B. by said David Hughes ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 6. John David, yeoman, and Margaret David, spinster, both of 
the parish of Trelech, Carms.* B. by said John David and 
Michael Rees of the said parish of Trelech ar Bettus. 

Nov. 6. John Jeremy, yeoman, and Sarah Evan, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lanegwad, Carms.* B. by said John Jeremy 
and Henry Richard of the same parish, yeoman ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 8. William Bowen, gent., and Anne Rees, spinster, both of the 
parish of Llanelly, Carms.* B. by said William Bowen and 
John Rees of the same parish, gent. 

Nov. 15. Rees Rees of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Jones of the parish of Llanedy, Carms., spinster.* 

Nov. 15. David Thomas of the parish of Llanelly, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mar^' Davies of the parish of Landeveylog, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said David Thomas and Walter Williams 
of the same parish, farmer ; witness : N. Morgan, notary 
public. 

Nov. 16. John Rees, yeoman, and Mary Price, spinster, a minor, both 
of the parish of Lanedy, Carms. With consent of her 
mother.* B. by said John Rees. 



1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



i66 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 

Nov. 17. Thomas Thomas, yeoman, and Margaret David, spinster, 
both of the parish of Lansadum, Carms.^ B. by said 
Thomas Thomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 22. John Lloyd of the parish of Lanwenog, Cards., gent., and 
Mary Parry of the parish of Landissiliogogo, Cards., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said John Lioyd. 

Nov, 24. John David of the parish of Trelech ar Bettus, Carms., 
yeoman, and Elisabeth Philip of the parish of Abemant, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. bj' said John David and Michael Rees 
of the said parish of Treleach ar Bettus, farmer. 

Nov. 27. Joshua Griffiths of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., gent., 
and Mary Price of the parish of Llanedy, Carms., spinster.* 
B. by said Joshua Griffiths. 

Dec. 4. John Richard of the parish of Lanpimsaint, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Sarah Evan of the parish of Langeler, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said John Richard and David Lewis of the 
parish of Llanllawthog, Carms., gent. 

Dec. 7. Thomas Evan of the parish of Silian, Cards., yeoman, and 
Mary Evan of the parish of Lampiter pont Stephen, Cards., 
spinster.* B. by said Thomas Evan ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Dec. 13. Samuel W^illiam of the parish of Abemant, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Jenkin of the parish of Newchurch, Carms., 
widow.* B. by said Samuel Williams. 

Dec. 15. John Philipps of the parish of Llandilofawr, Carms., gent., 
and Florentia Mary Bridget Lloyd of the parish of Llan- 
gadock, Carms., spinster.* B. by said John Philipps; 
witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Dec. 15. Griffith Rowland of the parish of Lanarthney, Carms., gent., 
and Mary Jenkins of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
widow.* B. by said Griffith Rowland and John Evans of 
the said parish of Llanarthney ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 18. John David of the parish of Lanfihangel Rhos y Com, 
Carms., yeoman, and Sarah Jones of the parish of Llany- 
byther, Carms., spinster.* B. by said John David ; wit- 
ness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 18. John Wynne and Martha Aubrey, Swansea.* 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur.' 

* This, with other similar brief entries, is written on a sheet of paper 
deposited amongst the marriage bonds. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1784. 167 

Dec. 22. John Pugh, gent., and Catharine Williams, widow, both of 
the parish of Landebye, Carms.' B. by said John Pugh. 

Dec. 29. David Jenkins of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, gent., 
and Lcttice Jenkins of the parish of Friestrop, Perns., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said David Jenkins and William George of 
Carmarthen, shopkeeper ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 29. Thomas Jenkins, gent., and Anne Richards, spinster, both 
of the parish of Clydcu, Pems.' B. by said Thomas Jenkins ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 



1785. 

Jan. 3. William Jenkin of the parish of Langunnor, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Anne Price of the parish of Lanfynidd, Carms., 
widow. ^ B. by said William Jenkins and Morgan David of 
the said parish of Llanfyuydd ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jan. II. David Williams, gent., and Elisabeth Lloyd, spinster, both 
of the parish of Penbrey, Carms. ^ B. by said David Wil- 
liams ; witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Jan. 14. Daniel Price of the parish of Kilycomb, Carms., gent., and 
Daetitia Prutherch of the parish of Lanfihaiigel Rhos y 
Com, Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Daniel Price ; witness : 
N. Morgan, notary public. 

Jan. 15. James Lewis, yeoman, and Margaret William, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lanwinio, Carms. ^ B. by said James Lewis ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jan. 15. Morgan Morgans of the parish of Lanworda, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Sarah Edwards of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Morgan Morgan and David Lake of 
the parish of Llaugunnor, Carms., gent. ; witness : N. 
Morgan, notary public. 

Jan. 17. Evan Rees of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Jones of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
widow. ^ B. by said Evan Rees and William Davies of the 
parish of Llanarthney, Carms., butcher ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Jan. 18. Peter Davies, mariner, and Mary Morris, spinster, both of 
the parish of Newport, Perns. ^ B. by said Peter Davies and 
John Nicholas of the same parish, mariner ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Bur'. 



i68 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 

Jan. 18. Dan Lloyd, yeoman, and Mary Thomas, spinster, both of 
the parish of Langan, Carms/ B. by said Dan Lloyd and 
Edward Hicks of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen ; 
witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Jan. 26. Rees Thomas of the parish of Lanon, Carms., yeoman, and 
Catharine Batcock of the parish of Laurhidian, Glam., 
spinster.^ B. by said Rees Thomas ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jan. 28. Thomas Makeig of the parish of Landygwidd, Cards., gent., 
and Margaret Millingchamp of the parish of Cardigan, spin- 
ster.-^ B. by said Thomas Makeig and Thomas Williams of 
Carmarthen, mercer ; w itness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Jan. 29. David Philip of the parish of Abernant, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jane Lewis of the parish of Cynwil Elvet, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said David Philip and Rees Thomas of the said 
parish of Conwill Elvet ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jan. 29. Thomas Powell, gent., and Rachel Evans, spinster, both of 
the parish of I,aughame, Carms. ^ B. by said Thomas 
Powell and John Powell of the same place, gent. ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Feb. I. Thomas Edwards of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., gent., 
and Margaretta Leach of the parish of St. Clears, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Edwards. 

Feb. 3. James Thomas, yeoman, and Anna Thomas, spinster, both 
of the parish of Landyssil, Cards. ^ B. by said James Thomas 
and Edward Evan of Carmarthen, yeoman ; witness : John 
Rogers. 

Feb. 5. Philip David of the parish of I/anvemach, Pems., yeoman, 
and Hanna Rogers of the parish of Lanwinio, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said Philip David and James Philip of the 
same place, farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 7. Griffith Jenkins of the parish of Swansea, Glam., gent., and 
Mary Hitchiags of the parish of Lansamlet, Glam., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said Griffith Jenkins and George Lyndon of 
the said parish of Swansea, gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 8. Richard Davies, clerk, and Mary Davies, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llangeney, co. Brecon.'' B. by said Richard 
Davies and Christopher Davies of the said parish of Llan- 
geney, esq. ; witness : Tho. Jones, notary public. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Bur'. 
* Fiat issued by W. Wynter, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 169 

Feb. 12. William Davies of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Elizabeth Morgan of the parish of St. Peter, Car- 
marthen, spinster.^ B. by said William Davies and Griffith 
Rowland of Carmarthen, victualler ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Feb. 12. Joshuah Leonard, yeoman, and Mary Hughes, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Clears, Carms.* B. by said Joshua 
Leonard ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 12. Thomas Morgan of the parish of Lampiter pont Stephen, 
Cards., gent., and Elisabeth Davies of the parish of Lan- 
wenog. Cards., widow.* B. by said Thomas Morgan ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 23. Thomas Francis of the parish of Llangainge, Carms., farmer, 
and Mary Phillip of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
widow.* B. by said Thomas Francis ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. To be married at the chapel of Llanllouch. 

Feb. 23. Thomas Thomas, yeoman, and Jane David, spinster, both 
of the parish of Langadock, Carms.* B. by said Thomas 
Thomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 24. Thomas Jones of the parish of Langeler, Carms., yeoman, 
and Martha Howell of the parish of Kennarth, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said Thomas Jones and Thomas Rees of 
of the said parish of Kennarth, yeoman ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Feb. 26. Benjamin Philipps of the parish of Lanfalteg, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Anne Griffiths of the parish of Landewy Velfrey, 
Pems., widow. ^ B. by said Benjamin PhiUpps ; witness: 
Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 19. David William, yeoman, and Mary Rees, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanllawddog, Carms.* B. by said David 
William and Henry Rees of the parish of Llandissil, Carms., 
farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Apr. 30. William Harry of the parish of Talley, Carms., yeoman, and 
Margaret Morgan of the parish of Landilofawr, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said William Harry and Samuel Evans of 
the said parish of Talley, farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Apr. 30. Harry William of the parish of Brechva, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jane David of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms., spin- 
ster.* B. by said Harry William and John Davies of the 
said parish of Llanegwad ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 
' Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



170 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 

May II. Morris Richard of the parish of Kennarth, Canns., yeoman, 
and Mary Griffith of the parish of Llandydoch, Cards, [sic], 
spinster.^ B. by said Morris Richard and James Richard of 
the same parish, farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 14. Evan Brown, yeoman, and Jane Harry, spinster, both of 
the parish of Laughame, Carms.^ B. by said Evan Brown 
and David Harry of the said parish of Laughame, yeoman ; 
witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

May 16. William Langdon of the parish of Langeler, Carms., gent., 
and Margaret Rogers of the parish of Ystrad, Cards., spin- 
ster ^ B by said William Langdon ; witness : N. Morgan, 
notary public. 

May 17. Evan Daniel of the parish of Danybyther, Carms., yeoman, 
and Sarah David of the parish of Llanlloony, Carms., 
widow. ^ B. by said Evan Daniel; witness: N. Morgan, 
notary public. 

May 21. David John of the parish of Mydrim, Carms., yeoman, and 
Jane Price of the parish of Lanfihangel Abercowin, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said David John ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

May 25. Evan Davies, gent., and Mary Philipps, widow, both of the 
parish of Lanelly, Carms. ^ B. by said Evan Davies ; wit- 
ness : Dan. Williams. 

May 31. Evan Evans of the parish of Lanfihangel Rhos y Com, 
Carms., yeoman, and Diana Thomas of the parish of Llan- 
llawthog, Carms., widow.^ 

May 31. James Rees of the parish of Monington, Pems., yeoman, 
and Mary James of Moylgrove, Pems., spinster.^ B. by 
said James Rees and Samuel Deykes of Carmarthen, sadler ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jun. I. John Evan of the parish of Lansadum, Carms., yeoman, and 
Jane John of the parish of Talley, Carms., widow. ^ 

Jun. 3. Thomas Edwards, gent., and Margaret Jones, spinster, both 
of the parish of Landilovawr, Carms. "^ B. by said Thomas 
Edwards and David Lake of the parish of Llangunnor, 
Carms., gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jun. 3. Samuel Thomas of the parish of Llanlloony, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Anne Thomas of the parish of Pencarreg, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Samuel Thomas and Evan Joshua of 
the said parish of Llanlloony, farmer ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 171 

Jun. 4. Edward Jones Bowen of the parish of Abcrgwilly, Carms., 
gent., and Mary Bowcu of the parish of Cynwilgaio, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Edward Jones Bowen and Thomaa 
Williams of Carmartlien, gent. ; witness : Charles Morgan. 

Jim. 7. David Thomas of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, yeo- 
man, and Mary James of the parish of Cynwil Elvct, Carms., 
widow.* 

Jun. 25, Harry David of the parish of Lauwrda, Carms., yeoman, 
and Margaret Nicholas of the parish of Cynwilgaio, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said Harry David and William Thomas of 
the said parish of Conwilgaio, cordwainer ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Jim. 30. David Hugh of the parish of Llanfihangel Geneurglyn, 
Cards., yeoman, and Elizabeth Daniel of the parish ot 
Llangynfelin, Cards., spinster.* 

Jun. 30. Thomas John of the parish of Bettws Bledrws, Cards., 
yeoman, and Mary Morgan of the parish of Ystrad, Cards., 
widow.* 

Jul. I. Josiah William of the parish of Llanwinio, Carms., yeoman, 
and Esther Lloyd of the parish of Llanboidy, spinster.' 
B. by said Josiah William ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jul. 4. John Prosser, gent., and Margaret Hughes, spinster, both ot 
the parish of Kidwelly, Carms.* B. by said John Prosser ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jul. II. Evan Jones of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Thomas of the parish of Landewy Brevy, Cards., 
spinster.* B. by said Evans Jones ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jul. 1 1 . Michael Maligere, yeoman, and Susannah Michael, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.* B. by said 
Michael Maligere and Anthony Michael of Carmarthen, 
fisherman ; witness : N. Morgan. 

Jul. 23. David Morgan of the parish of Lanwnnen, Cards., gent., and 
Jane Morgan of the parish of Lampiter pont Stephen, 
Cards., spinster.* B. by said David Morgan and Thomas 
Jones of Carmarthen, victualler ; witness : Daniel W i l li a m s. 

Jul. 26. John Laughame of Laughame, Carms., gent., and Charlott 
Elliot of the same place, spinster. B. by said John 
Laughame ; witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 
* Fiat issued by Isaac Williams, Sur'. 



172 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 

Jul. 30. Rees Williams of the parish of Mydrim, Carms., gent., and 
Mary Philipps of the parish of Lanfallteg, Carms., spinster.^ 
B. by said Rees Williams ; witness : N. Morgan, notary 
public. 

Jul. 30. William Williams, gent., and Catharine Morris, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ B. by said 
William Williams and James Athoe of the said parish of St. 
Peter, gent. ; witness : Charles Morgan. 

Aug. 5. William Lewis of the parish of Lanvernach, Pems., gent., 
and Elisabeth Bowen of the parish of Langlwydwen, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said WUliam Lewis ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Aug. 9. John Lewis, yeoman, and Mary Evan, spinster, both of the 
parish of Trelech ar Bettws, Carms.^ B. by said John Lewis 
and David Evan of the same parish, yeoman ; witness : N. 
Morgan, notary public. 

Aug. II. WUliam Hopkin of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
yeoman, and Elisabeth Rees of the parish of Langunnor, 
Carms., widow.^ B. by said William Hopkin and Thomas 
Jones of the said parish of St. Peter, victualler ; witness : 
N. Morgan, notary public. 

Aug. 13. Thomas Harries of the parish of Newport, Pems., yeoman, 
and Mary Williams of the parish of Lanelly, Carms., spin- 
ster.-^ B. by said Thomas Harries and John Williams of 
the parish of Llanelly, shoemaker ; witness : N. Morgan, 
notary public. 

Aug. 15. Evan Joseph, yeoman, and Rachel Evan, widow, both of 
the parish of Landyssil, Cards. ^ B. by said Evan Joseph 
and John Lewis, junior, of Carmarthen ; witness : Thomas 
Williams. 

Aug. 16. Thomas Nicholas of the parish of Llewel, co. Brecon, yeo- 
man, and Mary Thomas of the parish of Landilo-vane, co . 
Brecon, spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Nicholas and William 
Williams of the said parish of Llewel, yeoman ; witness : 
N. Morgan, deputy registrar and notary public. 

Aug. 23. John Jones of the parish of Langadock, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jane Nicholas of the parish of Landdoysant, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said John Jones ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 173 

Sep. 3. Thomas Nicholas of the parish of Lanfemach, Pems., yeo- 
man, and Jennet Thomas of the parish of Trclech ar Bettws, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Nicholas and Thomas 
Thomas of the said parish of Trelech ar Bettws, farmer ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 6. Thomas Owen of the parish of Langolman, Pems., yeoman, 
and Dorothy Twyny of the parish of Lankeven, Pems., 
widow.* 

Sep. 7. David Richard of the parish of Kellan, Cards., yeoman, and 
Rachel Rees of the parish of Bettws Bledrws, Cards., spin- 
ster.* 

Oct. I. Walter Arnold, yeoman, and Anne Philipps, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lanelly, Carms.* B. by said Walter Arnold 
and John Morgan of the said parish of Llanelly, weaver ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 5. George Howell of the parish of St. Clears, Carms , victualler, 
and Mary David of the parish of Llanvihangel Abercowin, 
Carms., widow. ^ 

Oct. 5. Daniel Lewis of the parish of Llandissyl, Cards., yeoman, 
and Margaret Jenkins of the parish of Llanhanel Yeroth, 
Carms., widow.* 

Oct. 7. Thomas Eowen, gent., and Elinor Davies, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lanegwad, Carms.* B. by said Thomas Bowen 
and Owen Morris of Carmarthen, gent. ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Oct. 10. John Thomas, yeoman, and Mary William, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lansadum, Carms.* B. by said John 
Thomas ; Witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 15. John David, yeoman, and Jane Bowen, spinster, both of 
the parish of Landyssil, Care's.* B. by said John David. 

Oct, 22. Evan Thomas of the parish of Lansawel, Carms., yeoman, 
and Sarah David of the parish of Lanfynidd, Carms., spin- 
ster.* B. by said Evan Thomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 26. John Davies, gent., and Lettice Davies, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanwenog, Cards.* B. by said John Davies 
and Thomas Gower of the said parish of Llanwenog, gent. ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur.' 

» Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



174 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 

Oct. 29. David Hugh of the parish of Lanelly, Carms., yeoman, and 
Anne Saunders of the parish of Lanon, Carms., spinster.* 
B. by said David Hugh ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. I. William Philipps, yeoman, and Letitia Rees, spinster, both 
of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ B. by said William 
Philipps ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 3. William Rees, yeoman, and Mary Lodowick, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms.* B. by said William 
Rees and John Jones of the said parish of Llanegwad, gent. ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 4. Isaac Bailey of the parish of Margam, Glam., gent., and 
Susannah Teague of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
spinster.* B. by said Isaac Bailey. 

Nov. 4. Richard Jones of the parish of Lampiter Velfrey, Perns., 
gent., and Martha Griffith of the parish of Landewy Velfrey, 
Perns., spinster.* B. by said Richard Jones ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 5. William Thomas of the parish of Lanfihangel Aberby thick, 
Carms., yeoman, and Elisabeth John of the parish of Lan- 
arthney, Carms., spinster.* B. by said William Thomas. 

Nov. 9. Thomas Griffith of the parish of St. Ismael, Carms., yeoman, 
and Frances Griffiths of the parish of Langendeim, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said Thomas Griffiths and John Edward 
of the said parish of St. Ismaels. 

Nov. 10. Henry Charles, yeoman, and Margaret Rees, spinster, both 
of the parish of Landyssil, Cards.* B. by said Henry 
Charles ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 10. Benjamin Morris of the parish of Lansadumen, Carms., 
yeoman, and Jane Hancock of the parish of Lampiter 
Velfrey, Perns., spinster.* B. by said Benjamin Morris ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. II. Isaac Lewis of the parish of St. Issel, Pems., gent., and 
Mary Davies of the parish of Bigelly, Pems., spinster.* B. 
by said Isaac Lewis and Isaac Thomas of the said parish of 
Begelly, gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 14. John Evans of the parish of Abemant, Carms., gent., and 
Mary WUliams of the parish of Langunnog, Carms., widow.^ 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1785. 175 

Nov. 14. Harry Jabetli, yeoman, aud Alice Lewis, spinster, both of 
the parish of Languke, Glam/ B. by said Harry Jabeth ; 
■witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 14. Thomas Michael, yeoman, and Elisabeth William, widow, 
both of the parish of Lanarthney, Carms.* 

Nov. 14. Thomas Rees, yeoman, and Elisabeth Harries, spinster, 
botli of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms.* B. by said Thomas 
Rees ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 28. Robert Jones of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., gent., and 
Ehsabeth Harries of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said Robert Jones and Edward Gower of the 
parish of St. Ismael, Carms., gent. 

Dec. 3. Morgan David of the parish of Lanfynidd, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jemima Rees of the parish of Talley, Carms., spinster.^ 
B. by said Morgan David ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 5. Samuel Williams, yeoman, and Mary Evan, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lanybydder, Carms. ^ B. by said Samuel 
Williams and Howell Davies of Carmarthen, cordwainer. 

Dec. 10. Benjamin Davies of the parish of KUgerran, Pems., yeoman, 
and Margaret Williams of the parish of Lansawel, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Benjamin Davies. 

Dec. 12. David Roberts, gent., and Mary Thomas, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ B. by said David 
Roberts ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 17. John Grifl&th, yeoman, and Sarah Evan, spinster, both of 
the parish of LanfihEingel Yeroth, Carms. ^ B. by said John 
GriflBth and John Evan of the said parish of Llanfihangel 
Yeroth, farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 22. Samuel Morgan of the parish of Conwilgaio, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Margaret Harry of the parish of Talley, Carms., 
widow. ^ 

Dec. 26. John Harry of the parish of Llanegwad, Carms., shop- 
keeper, and Sarah Thomas of the parish of St. Peter, Car- 
marthen, spinster.^ 

Dec. 28. Rees Griffiths of the parish of Talley, Carms., yeoman, and 
Catharine Thomas of the parish of Landevyson, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Rees Griffiths ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur.' 



176 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 

Dec. 30. William Rees of the parish of Lanelly, Canns., yeoman, and 
Anne Jones of the parish of Langennych, Carms., spinster.^ 
B. by said William Rees and Rees William of the said parish 
of Llangennech, farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

1786. 

Jan. 3. David Lewis of the parish of Landewy Velfrey, Perns., gent., 
and Elisabeth Lewis of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
spinster.^ To be married at Llanllwch by ye consent of the 
vicar of Carmarthen. 

Jan. 4. John Benjamin of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., yeo 
man, and Mary John of the parish of Cynwill, Carms. 
widow.* It is endorsed ' 1786.' 

Jan. 5. John Edward of the parish of Langynnidd, co. Brecon 
yeoman, and Elisabeth Woolcock of the parish of St. Peter 
Carmarthen, spinster.^ 

Jan. 9. Henry Thomas of the parish of Landilovawr, Carms., yeo 
man, and Mary Nicholas of the parish of Talle>, Carms. 
spinster.^ B. by said Henry Thomas and William Thomas 
of the said parish of Talley ; witness : N. Morgan, notary 
public. 

Jan. II. William David of the parish of Penbrey, Carms., yeoman, 
and Maria Davies of the parish of St. Ismael, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said William David ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jan. II. David Jones of the parish of Trefthin, co. Mon., gent., and 
Hannah Jones of the parish of Troedyroir, Cards., widow.'^ 

Jan. 20. Edward Davies, farmer, and Anne Thomas, spinster, both 
of the parish of Talley, Carms.* B. by said Edward Davies. 

Jan. 21, David Williams, yeoman, and Elinor Jones, spinster, both 
of the parish of Llanlloony, Carms.'^ B. by said David Wil- 
liams and John Jones of the said parish of Llanlloony, 
yeoman ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 4, John Howell, yeoman, and Margaret Philip, spinster, both 
of the parish of Trelech ar Bettws, Carms.^ B. by said John 
Howell and David Philip of the same parish, yeoman ; 
witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Feb. 6. Thomas Mansel of the parish of St. Mary, Pembroke, gent., 
and Margaret Poyer of the parish of Newton, Perns., widow.^ 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

* Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 177 

Feb. 10. Evan Jones, yeoman, and Anne Morgan, spinster, both of 
the parish of Kellau, Cards.* B. by said Evan Jones and 
John Francis of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms. ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Feb. II. John Edward of the parish of Lanwrda, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jane Lewis of the parish of Langadock, Carms., spin- 
ster.* B. by said John Edward. 

Feb. II. William Evans, clerk, and Jennet Rees, widow, both of the 
parish of Landeveylog, Carms.* 

Feb. 25. Daniel Fisher of the parish of Lanfyuidd, Carms., yeoman, 
and Anne David of the parish of Landilofawr, Carms., spin- 
ster.* B. by said Daniel Fisher ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 2. Thomas Davies, yeoman, and Mary Stonehewer, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.* B. by said 
Thomas Davies and Hugh Stonehewer of Carmarthen, 
victualler ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 4. John Thomas, yeoman, and Hesther John, spinster, both of 
the parish of Trelech ar Bettws, Carms.* B. by said John 
Thomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 20. John Thomas, yeoman, and Joan Williams, widow, both of 
the parish of Landilofawr, Carms.* 

Mar. 20. Isaac Williams, yeoman, and Jemima Thomas, spinster, 
both of the parish of Kilycomb, Carms.* B. by said Isaac 
Williams and Thomas Owens ; witness : Thomas Williams. 

Mar. 24. Griffith Lewis of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, yeo- 
man, and Margaret Dyer of the parish of Llanllawthog, 
Carms., widow.* 

Mar. 24. John Thomas of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, yeo- 
man, and Mary Fisher of the parish of Lanfihangel Aber- 
bythich, Carms., spinster.* B. by said John Thomas; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Apr. I. Gabriel Rees of the parish of Llangolman, Perns., yeoman, 
and Sarah Thomas of the parish of Llanwinio, Carms., 
widow.* 

Apr. II. David Davies of the parish of Mothvey, Carms., and Sarah 
Williams of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, spinster.* 



1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

• Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur*. 



178 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 

Apr. 15. Thomas Lewis of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms., yeoman, 
and Priscilla Jones of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Lewis ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Apr. 22. Rev. James Rowlandes of the parish of Llandewy Brevy, 
Cards., clerk, and Winifred Lloyd of the parish of Llanfair 
Clydogau, Cards., spinster.* B. by said James Rowlandes 
and William Davies of Carmarthen, victualler ; witness : 
N. Morgan, notary public. 

Apr. 24. David Jones, widower, and Margaret Morgan, spinster, both 
of the parish of Llangathen, Carms.* B. by said David 
Jones and David Morgan of the parish of Llanarthney, 
Carms., farmer ; witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

May 5. Benjamin Jones of the parish of Penbryn, Cards., yeoman, 
and Anne Davis of the parish of Aberporth, Cards., spinster.* 

May 5. James Jones, yeoman, and Sarah Davis, spinster, both of 
the parish of Kidwelly, Carms.* 

May 9. William Daniel of the parish of Llanegwad, Carms., yeoman, 
and Jane Griffiths of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., 
spinster.* 

May 13. Griffith Clement of the parish of Llannon, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Hugh of the parish of Llantharog, Carms., spin- 
ster.* B. by said Griffith Clement; witness: Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

May 13. Thomas Francis of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
yeoman, and Mary Lewis of the parish of Llanarthney, 
Carms., widow.* 

May 18. William Rees, farmer, and Margaret David, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lansadurn, Carms.* B. by said William 
Rees ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 20. John Jack of the parish of Llanarchiron, Cards., yeoman, 
and Margaret Morris of Carmarthen, spinster.* B. by said 
John Jack ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 23. David Evans of the parish of Llanstephan, Carms., mariner, 
and Anne Davy of the parish of Carmarthen, spinster.* 
B. by said David Evans and William Beynon of Carmarthen, 
yeoman ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

2 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 179 

May 2^. Thomas Richards of the parish of Lanwiiiio, Carms., gent., 
and Mary Davies of the parish of Henllan Amgoed, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Richards and John Richards 
of the parish of Trelech ar Eettws, Carms., gent. 

May 31. David Boweu, yeoman, and Mary David, widov;, both of 
the parish of Landilovawr, Carms. ^ 

May 31. John Lewis, yeoman, and Sarah John, widow, both of the 
parish of Abergwilly, Carms. ^ 

Jim. 3. Thomas Morgan, farmer, and Rachel William, spinster, 
both of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms. ^ 

Jun. 14. Joseph Jones of the parish of Lanelly, Carms., gent., and 
Mary Long of the parish of Langennych, Carms., spinster.^ 
B. by said Joseph Jones. 

Jvm. 17. Samuel John, yeoman, and Mary Owen, spinster, both of 
the parish ot Landowror, Carms. ^ B. by said Samuel John 
and Griffith Howell of the said parish of Landowror, farmer. 

Jvm. 20. Thomas Morgan, yeoman, and Mary Price, widow, both of 

the parish of Landebye, Carms.^ 
Jim. 24. Josuah Jenkin of the parish of Mydrim, Carms., yeoman, 

and Elisabeth Morgan of the parish of Lanboidy, Carms., 

spinster.^ 

Jun. 24. Thomas Thomas, yeoman, and Mary Philip, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lanelly, Carms. ^ B. by said Thomas 
Thomas. 

Jul. 5. Thomas Griffiths of the parish of Kellan, Cards., gent., and 
Hannah Davies of the parish of Llanfair Cledoge, Cards., 
spinster.* 

Jul. 5. Benjamin Jenkins, yeoman and Margaret Evans, spinster, 
both of the parish of Llanfair Cledoge, Cards.* 

Jul. 12. Evan John of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., widower, 
and Elizabeth Philipps of the parish of Llandeveilog, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said Evan John ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jul. 13. William Fountain of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
farmer, and Mary Jenkins of the parish of Newchurch, 
widow.* 

Jul. 14. David Hughes, clerk, and Elinor Griffiths, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanarth, Cards.* B. by said David Hughes ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

* Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



i8o Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 

Jul. 15. David Stephens and Jane Griffith, spinster, both of the 
parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Jul. 23. David Morgan of the parish of I,lanwnnen, Cards, gent., 
and Jane Morgan of the parish of Lampiter pont Stephen, 
Cards.^ 

Aug. 12. John David of the parish of Llangevelach, Glam., yeoman, 
and Elizabeth Williams of the parish of Llandilo Talybont, 
Glam., spinster. B. by said John David ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Aug. 12. John Dewis of the parish of Llangevelach, Glam., gent., and 
Lucy Jerviss of the parish of Killybebill, Glam., spinster.^ 
B. by said John Lewis ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Aug. 22. Isaac Philips, mariner, and Mary White, widow, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Sep. 2. Evan Williams of the parish of Llanfynydd, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Margaret Davies of the parish of Llandilo, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Evan Williams ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Sep. 4. Joseph Jenkins of the parish of Skenferth, co. Mon., car- 
penter, and Anna Watkins of the parish of Martletwy, 
Pems., spinster.^ B. by said Joseph Jenkins. 

Sep. 9. John Jones of the parish of Llanllony, Carms., yeoman, and 
Mary Davies of the parish of Llanfynnydd, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said John Jones. 

Sep. 12. Rees Morgan, yeoman, and Anne James, widow, both of 
the parish of Llansawel, Carms.^ 

Sep. 26. Anthony Moses, yeoman, and Hannah John, spinster, both 
of the parish of Lanegwad, Carms. ^ B. by said Anthony 
Moses and William Lewis of the said parish of Llanegwad, 
mason ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 30. David Jones of the parish of Llanlwny, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Llewellyn of the parish of Llanvehangel-eroth, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said David Jones. 

Oct. 2. John Harris of the parish of Bettus, Carms., yeoman, and 
Anne Manwairing of the parish of Llandibye, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said John Harris ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 3. John Lewis, gent., and Bridget Brigstock, spinster, both of 
the parish of Lampiter Velfrey, Pems.^ B. by said John 
Lewis ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 

2 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 181 

Oct. 5. Lewis Thomas of the parish of Caio, Carms., yeoman, and 
Sarah Roderick of the parish of Llampeter pont Stephen, 
Cards., spinster.^ B. by said Lewis Thomas ; witness : 
Dau. WilUams. 

Oct. II. John Protheroe of the parish of Egermont, Carms., esq., 
and Lucia Cordelia Skyrme of the parish of Llawhadon, 
Pem.s., spinster. 

Oct. 14. Thomas Morris of the parish of Llanfehangel Penbedew, 
Perns., gent., and Anna Howell of the parish of Llauboidy, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Morris and David 
Thomas of Carmarthen, mercer ; witness : N. Morgan, 
notary public. 

Oct. 14. Hugh Stonehewer of Carmarthen, gent., and Mary Brooks 
of the parish of Narberth, Pems., spinster.^ B. by said 
Hugh Stonehewer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 18. William Rees, yeoman, and Jane Davies, spinster, both of 
the parish of Kellan, Cards. ^ B. by said William Rees ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 26. Evan Williams of the parish of Llanguby, Cards., clerk, and 
Mary Davies of the parish of Llanfair Clodogau, Cards., 
spinster.^ B. by said Evan Williams ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Oct. 28. Griffith Jones of the parish of Llanddarog, Carms., clerk, 
and Sarah Griffith of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., 
widow. 

Oct. 31. Griffith Jones, yeoman, and Elizabeth Thomas, spinster, 
both of the parish of Kellan, Cards.^ B. by said Griffith 
Jones ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 31. William Williams, yeoman, and Elizabeth Rogers, spinster, 
both of the parish of Llangaddock, Carms. ^ B. by said 
William Williams ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 6. William Gwynne of the parish of Moelgrove, Pems., gent., 
and Elisabeth Phillips of the parish of St. Dogmels, Pems., 
spinster.^ At Moelgrove. 

Nov. 7. John Anney, gent., and Jane Rice, spinster, both of the 
parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.' B. by said John Anney ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 9. Samuel Joseph of the parish of Llandissil, Cards., farmer, 
and Jane Evan of the parish of Llangeler, Carms., spinster.^ 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 

2 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

3 Fiat issued by John Evans, Sur'. 



i82 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 

Nov. 9. William Williams of the parish of Conwil Caio, Carms., 
clerk, and Eleanor Williams of the parish of Llandefysant, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said William Williams ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 14. John Davies of the parish of Llaugharne, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Bowen of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
spinster.^ B. by said John Davies; witness: Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Nov. 14. Benjamin GrilB&th of the parish of Mannardivy, Pems., 
gent., and Mary Davies of the parish of Llanwinio, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Benjamin Griffiths ; witness : Dan, 
Williams. 

Nov. 17. Samuel Jones of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., mariner, 
and Margaret Williams of the parish of St. Peter, Carmar- 
then, spinster.^ B. by said Samuel Jones and Herbert 
Lloyd of Carmarthen ; witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Nov. 18. Evan Jenkin of the parish of Lanbadarn Odyn, Cards., 
yeoman, and Elisabeth Davies of the parish of Caron» 
Cards., spinster.* B. by said Evan Jenkins and John Jones 
of the parish of Gunnws, Cards., yeoman ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Nov. 28. Thomas Lewis of the parish of LlanhamuU, co. Brecon, 
farmer, and Elizabeth Thomas of the parish of Llanfihangel 
Abercowin, Carms., widow. ^ 

Dec. 2. David Jones, farmer, and Jane Davies, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llangenach, Carms.^ B. by said David Jones. 
Signed ' David Johnes.' 

Dec. 12. Edward Hughes of the parish of St. Mary, Tenby, clerk, 
and Sarah Rees of the parish of Llanfihangel Yeroth, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Edward Hughes; witness: 
Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 14. Moses Closs, yeoman, and Sarah Palmer, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llaugharne, Carms. "^ B. by said Moses Closs ; 
witness: Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 16. Henry Simon, yeoman, and Rebecca Lewis, widow, both of 
the parish of Llangenech, Carms. ^ 

Dec. 20. Thomas Llewellyn, yeoman, and Margaret Jones, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ B. by said 
Thomas Llewellyn ; witness : Dan. Williams. 



1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 
* Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1786. 183 

Dec. 27. John William Lewis of the parish of Llaufynydd, Carms., 
farmer, and Elizabeth David of the parish of Tallcy, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said John William Lewis and Harry Phillip 
of the said parish of Llanfynydd, farmer ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Dec. 29. David Watkiu of the parish of Llandissiliogogo, Cards., 
gent., and Jane Thomas of the parish of Llanarth, Cards., 
spinster.* B. by said David Watkins and David Thomas 
of the said parish of Llandissiliogogo, farmer ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

1787. 

Jan. 10. Walter Miller of tlie parish of St. Bottols in the city of 
London, gent., and Martha Thomas of the parish of Llan- 
gaddock, Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Walter Miller ; 
witness: Dan. Williams. The fiat is dated 1786, but the 
bond is dated 1787. 

Jan. 16. William Lewis of the parish of Llangaddock, Carms., farmer, 
and Sarah Jones of the parish of Llandilovawr, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said William Lewis ; witness : N. Morgan, 
notary public. 

Jan. 18. Edward Tyer of the parish of Swansea, Glam., gent., and 
Jane Rees of the parish of Landebye, Carms., spinster.* 
B. by said Edward Tyer ; witness : Thomas \\'illiams. 

Jan. 23. David Morries, gent., and Margaret Philipps, widow, both 
of the parish of Llangunnor, Carms. ^ 

Jan. 24. John Samuel, yeoman, and Mary Evan, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llandysil, Cards. ^ B. by said John Samuel. 

Jan. 25. Henry Phillips, gent., and Mary Lewis, spinster, both of the 
parish of St. Mary, Pembroke.^ B. by said Henry Phillips ; 
witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

Jan. 29. Thomas Vaughan of the parish of Llangendeirne, Carms., 
farmer, and Jane Davies of the parish of Llandevilog, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Vaughan ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Feb. 12. Evan Job, yeoman, and Margaret Jones, spinster, both o^ 
the parish of Abergwilly, Carms. ^ 



1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 
* Fiat issued by John Evans, Sur'. 



184 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1787. 

Feb. 14. Johu Owen, farmer, and Jane Jenkins, spinster, both of the 
parish of Llandibie, Carms/ B. by said John Owen and 
Richard Thomas of the same parish, mason : witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 3. John Evans of the parish of Llanbydder, Carms., carpenter, 
and Frances John of the parish of Ystrad, Cards., spinster.^ 
B. by said John Evans and James Jones of the said parish 
of Llanybyther, farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 5. David Rees, farmer, and Anne Evans, widow, both of the 
parish of Pencarreg, Carms. ■^ 

Mar. 7. John Dunn of Carmarthen, yeoman, and Mary Thomas of 
the parish of Llandilofawr, Carms., spinster.^ B. by said 
John Dunn. 

Mar. 12. David John of the parish of Llangunnog, Carms., shoe- 
maker, and Mary Jenkins of the parish of Llanstephan, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said David John; witnesses: 
Thomas Williams ; Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 22. William Lewis, farmer, and Mary Williams, spinster, both 
of the parish of Llanfynidd, Carms. ^ B. by said William 
Lewis and Lewis Lewis of the said parish of Llanfynidd, 
shoemaker ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 24. David James of the parish of Llaugunnor, Carms., farmer, 
and Margaret Rees of the parish of Llanelly, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said David James and William Bowen of the 
said parish of Llanelly, gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Apr. 6. Henry Thomas, farmer, and Mary Williams, spmster, both 
of the parish of Llanfynidd, Carms. ^ B. by said Henry 
Tnomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Apr. 7. Rees Morgan of the parish of Llangi'bby, Cards., gent., and 
Jane Davies of the parish of Kellan, Cards., spinster.^ B. 
by said Rees Morgan and Evan Daniel of the parish of 
Llandewey Brevy, Cards., carpenter ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Apr. 27. William Williams, gent., and Mary Charles, spinster, both 
of Carmarthen.^ B. by said William Williams ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

May 10. Thomas Davies, farmer, and Anne Charles, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llangathen, Carms. ^ B. by said Thomas 
Davies ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 17S7. 185 

May 18. Francis Jones, gent., and Rose Jenkins, spinster, both of 
the parish of Laugharne, Carms.' B. by said Francis Jones ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 26. David Howell, farmer, and Jane Thomas, spinster, both of 
the parish of LlanncUy, Carms.^ B. by said David Howell ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jun. 4. Thomas Rees of the parish of Laudilovawr, Carms., yeoman, 
and Elinor Williams of the parish of Laudeveyson, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said Thomas Rees ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jun. 9. Daniel Edward, yeoman, and Mary Howell, spinster, both 
of the parish of Laudeveylog, Carms. ^ B. by said Daniel 
Edwards ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jun. 13. Rees Evan, weaver, and Hester Lewis, spinster, both of the 
parish of Llanboidy, Carms.* B. by said Rees Evan ; 
witness : Dan. W'illiams. 

Jun. 23. David Evan, farmer, and Mary Williams, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanarthnej', Carms. ^ B. by said David Evan ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jul. 7. Thomas Scourfield of the parish of Llanboidy, Carms., 
farmer, and Elizabeth Sinclair of the parish of Llangan, 
spinster.^ B. by said Thomas Scourfield and Philip Scour- 
field of the parish of Llanginning, Carms., farmer ; witness : 
Dan. W^illiams. 

Jul. 13. John Whittle of the parish of Narberth, Pems., linen-draper, 
and Martha Webb of the parish of Mannorbeer, Perns., 
spinster.^ B. by said John Whittle and James Thomas of 
the parish of Lampiter Velfrey, Perns., gent. ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Jul. 21. Henry Price, yeoman, and Jane Owens, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ B. by said Henry 
Price ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jul. 28. John Jenkins of the parish of Llangevelach, Glam., farmer, 
and Alice Thomas of the parish of Llansamlet, Glam., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said John Jenkins and Leyson Loughor of the 
said parish of Llangevelach, yeoman ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Aug. 2. William John of the parish of Llangathen, Carms., farmer, 
and Elizabeth Williams of the parish of Llanegwad, Carms., 
widow. ^ 

^ Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 
2 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



1 86 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1787. 

Aug. 8. James Reynolds of the parish of Langrannog, Cards., gent., 
and Anne Davies of the parish of Penbryn, Cards., spinster.^ 
B. by said James Reynolds and Edward Jones Bowen of 
Rhywdowill, Carms., gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Aug. 15. William Howells of the parish of Llampiter Velfrey, Perns., 
farmer, and Mary Ormond of the parish of Llawhaden, 
Pems., spinster.^ B. by said William Howells ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Aug. 18. Thomas Freeman of the parish of Llannon, Carms., gent., 
and Mary Rees of the parish of Llannelly, Carms., spinster.* 
B. by said Thomas Freeman ; witness : Daniel L,ewys. 

Aug. 18. John Owen, farmer, and Sarah Watt, spinster, both of the 
parish of Laughame, Carms.* B. by said John Owen ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Aug. 18. John Williams of the parish of I,landevilog, Carms., gent., 
and Sarah Lewis of the parish of Llanvareth, co. Radnor, 
spinster.* B. by said John Williams. 

Aug. 23. Walter Horton, gent., and Elizabeth Rogers, spinster, both 
of Carmarthen.* B. by said Walter Horton and Walter 
Williams ; witness : W. H. Barker. 

Aug. 27. Thomas Evan of the parish of Pencarreg, Carms., farmer, 
and Elizabeth Jones of the parish of Ystrad, Cards., widow.* 

Sep. 3. George Wybourn Thomas of the parish of Llandilofawr, 
Carms., gent., and Rose Shewen of the parish of St. Peter, 
Carmarthen, spinster.* B. by said George Wybourn 
Thomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 8. Henry Evans of the parish of Mydrim, Carms., gent., and 
Elisabeth Howell of the parish of Laughame, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said Henry Evans. 

Sep. 10. James Howells of the parish of Llanfihangel Abercowin, 
Carms., gent., and Anne Howells of the parish of St. Peter, 
Carmarthen, spinster.* B. by said James Howells and 
Theophilus Howells of the said parish of St. Peter, gent. ; 
witness : W. H. Barker. 

Sep. 15. John Brown, gent., and Ann Hoskins, spinster, an infant, 
both of Kidwelly, Carms. ^ With con.sent of her father, 
John Hoskins, esq. B. by said John Brown ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 



1 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 

^ Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur.' 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1787. 187 

Sep. 19. Thomas Lewis of the paiish of I.lampeter Velfrey, Perns., 
yeoman, and Mary Thomas of the parish of Ciffig, Carms., 
spinster.* B. by said Thomas Lewis. 

Sep. 20. Howell Price of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, gent., 
and Catharine Aylmer of the parish of Laugharne, Carms., 
widow of Henry late Baron Aylmer of Balrath, Ireland. 
B. by said Howell Price and Walter Williams of the said 
parish of St. Peter, gent. ; witness : W. H. Barker. 

Sep. 22. Thomas David of the parish of Llaugludwen, Carms., 
farmer, and Sarah Lewis of the parish of Trelcach ar Bettus, 
Carms., spinster.* B. by said Thomas David and John 
Griffith of the parish of Llauwinio, Carms., farmer ; wit- 
ness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 22. Daniel Evans of the parish of Llauegwad, Carms., farmer, 
and Sarah Thomas of the parish of Merthyr, Carms., spin- 
ster.* B. by said Daniel Evans ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 29. John Christmas of the parish of Penboyr, Carms., farmer, 
and Rachel Evan of the parish of Llanfair, Cards., spinster.* 

Oct. 3. Thomas Humphreys, cabinet maker, and Mary Wear, spin- 
ster, both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.* B. by 
said Thomas Humphreys ; witness : Dan. WilUams. 

Oct. 3. Methusalem Williams of the parish of Llanvihangtl Yeroth, 
Carms., clerk, and Anne Morris of the parish of Llacgeller, 
Carms., spinster.* B. by said Methusalem Williams ; wit- 
ness : Dan. Williams. 

Richard Jenkin, farmer, and Catharine Lewis, spinster, 
both of the parish of Llangendeime, Carms.* 
William Roberts of the parish of Llantrissant, Glam., yeo- 
man, and Mary Evan of the parish of Llansadurn, Carms., 
widow.* 

John Jones, infant, and Anne Richards, widow, both of the 
parish of Llandilo, Carms.* With consent of his father. 
John Lewis, farmer, and Sarah Adams, spinster, both of 
the parish of Killymaenllwyd, Carms. B. by said John 
Lewis and Benjamin Edward of the same parish, yeoman ; 
witness : Dan. WilUams. 

Oct. 29. Daniel Williams, yeoman, and Sarah Bowen, spinster, both 
of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Oct. 30. Thomas Low, yeoman, and Mary Davies, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.* 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 
* Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


22, 


Oct. 


22 



i88 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1787, 

Nov. 12. James Morgan, farmer, and Catharine Davies, spinster, both 
of the parish of Pencarreg, Carms.^ B. by said James 
Morgan and Thomas David of the same parish, farmer ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 14. Evan Jones, gent., and Anne Thomas, spinster, both of the 
parish of Llandeveylog, Carms. B. by said Evan Jones ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 17. Stephen Davies of the parish of Laugharne, Carms., farmer, 
and Elizabeth Howell of the parish of Llandowror, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Stephen Davies and GrifiBth Howell 
of the said parish of Llandowror, farmer ; witness : Thomas 
Williams. 

Nov. 17. Benjamin Thomas, farmer, and Margaret Clarke, widow, 
both of the parish of Llannon, Carms. ^ B. by said Benjamin 
Thomas and W^illiam John of the said parish of Llanon ; 
witness : Thomas Williams. 

Nov. 19. David Davies, gent., and Posthuma Powell, spinster, both 
of the parish of Newchurch, Carms. ^ B. by said David 
Davies and Griffith Evans of the parish of Llandowror, 
Carms., clerk ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 21. David Morgan of the parish of Llandilofawr, Carms., farmer, 
and Anne Williams of the parish of Taley, Carms., spinster.-^ 

Nov. 22. David Griffith, clerk, and Anne Bowen, spinster, both of 
the parish of Nevern, Perns. B. by said David Griffith and 
George Bowen of Llwyngwair in the said parish of Nevern, 
esq. ; witness : James Griffiths of Nevern, merchant. 

Nov. 24. Jonathan Harry, yeoman, and Anne Morgan, spinster, both 
of the parish of Llandebie, Carms. ^ B. by said Jonathan 
Harry ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 24. John Philip of the parish of Llandissilio, Carms., farmer, 
and Hannah Philips of the parish of Henllan Amgoed, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said John Philip and Evan Griffith 
of Glanrhyd, Pems., esq. ; witness : N. Morgan, notary 
public. 

Dec. 4. William Hancock of the parish of Llanwinio, Carms., gent., 
and Alice Bevan of the parish of Llandowror, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said William Hancock ; \\itness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Dec. 6. John Lewis, smith, and Mary John, spinster, both of the 
parish of Abergwilly, Carms. ^ B. by said John Lewis; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 

2 Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1787. 189 

Dec. 8. Howell Jones of the parish of Cwnwil Elvell, Carms., gent., 
and Mary Philip of the parisli of Abernant, Carms., spinster, 
an infant.' With consent of her brother. B. by said Howell 
Jones and John Phillips of the said parish of Abernant, gent. 

Dec. 17. Thomas Williams of the parish of Llanboidy, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Elizabeth Rees of the parish of Llandewi Velfrey, 
Pems., widow.' 

Dec. 19. Morgan Thomas of the parish of Llandevilog, Carms., 
farmer, and Elizabeth Richard of the parish of Llanddarog, 
Carms., spinster.' B. by said Morgan Thomas; witness: 
Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 22. David Lewis of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., farmer, 
and Sarah Davies of the parish of Llandilo Talibont, Glam., 
widow.' 

Dec. 22. John Thomas of the parish of Llandyssil, Cards., farmer, 
and Elizabeth Simon of the parish of Llanybydder, Carms., 
spinster.' B. by said John Thomas and David John of the 
parish of Llanwenog, Cards., farmer ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

1788. 

Jan. I. David Thomas, farmer, and Elizabeth Jones, spinster, both 
of the parish of Treleach ar Bettus, Carms. B. by said 
David Thomas and Thomas James of the same parish, 
farmer ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jan. 5. John Llewellin of the parish of Welsh St. Donats, Glam., 
gent., and Mary Anne Lewis of the parish of Llanarchairon, 
Cards., spinster.' 

Jan. 9. David Lewis of the parish of Llandilofawr, Carms., farmer, 
and Margaret Williams of the parish of Talley, Carms., 
spinster.' B. by said David Lewis; witness: Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jan. 23, William Jones, carpenter, and Margaret Weston, spinster, 
both of the parish of Llangendeime, Carms.' B. by said 
William Jones ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Jan. 28. Thomas Rees of the parish of Llanboidy, Carms., farmer, 
and Elizabeth Jenkins of the parish of Llanlowddog, Carms., 
spinster.' B. by said Thomas Rees and John Edward of 
the parish of St. Clears, Carms. ; witness : Chas. Morgan. 

Jan. 30. Maurice Browne, clerk, and Mary Tj-son, widow, both of 
the parish of Laugharne, Carms.' 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



igo Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1788. 

Feb, 14. Evan Williams, yeoman, and Maria Edwards, -widow, both 
of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen/ 

Feb. 15. Thomas David, labourer, and Mary David, widow, both of 
the parish of Llandyssil, Cards. ^ 

Feb. 23. David GriflSth of the parish of LlandUofawr, Carms., farmer, 
and Lettice Lewis of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said David Griffith. 

Mar. I. Richard Lloyd, gent., and Elizabeth Lewis, spinster, both 
of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Mar. I. Edward Rees, gent., and Mary Wales, spinster, both of the 
parish of Pembree, Carms. ^ B. by said Edward Rees; 
witness : Thomas Williams. 

Mar. 5. David Harry of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, farmer, 
and Margaret Evans of the parish of Llandeveylog, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said David Harry and William John of 
the said parish of St. Peter, gent. ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 6. John Manwaring of the parish of Llandebie, Carms., farmer, 
and Anne Jones of the parish of Llanedy, Carms., spinster.^ 
B. by said John Manwaring ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Mar. 8. David Rogers of the parish of HenUan Amgoed, Carms., 
farmer, and Anne Williams of the parish of Llanwinio, 
Carms., widow. ^ 

Mar. 14. Owen Davies, gent., and Anne Thomas, spinster, both of 
the parish of Troed yr Oir, Cards. ^ B. by said Owen Davies 
and David Davids of the same parish, gent. ; witness : N. 
Morgan, notary public. 

Mar. 29. George Taylor of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., miariner, 
and Mary Jenkins of the parish of St. Ishmael, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said George Taylor ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Apr. I. Isaac James, labourer, and Ester Griffith, widow, both of 
the parish of Llangain, Carms. ^ 

Apr. 5. John Lewis of the parish of Llanfynnidd, Carms., farmer, 
and Mary Newell of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said John Lewis ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Apr. 12. Lewis Lewis of the parish of Llanfynidd, Carms., yeoman, 
and Deborah Williams of the parish of Llanfihangel Yeroth, 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said Lewis Lewis ; witness : Dan, 
Williams. 

1 Fiat issued by W, Higgs Barker, Sur', 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1788. 191 

Apr, 12, Thomas Williams, farmer, and Sarah Harry, widow, both of 
the parish of Llanybydder, Carms.^ 

Apr. 19. John Williams of the parish of Talley, Carms., farmer, and 
Esther Jones of the parish of Llansawel, Carms., spinster.^ 
B. by said John Williams ; witness : N. Morgan, notary 
public. 

Apr. 24. David Davies of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, doctor 
of physic, and Susannah Saunders of the parish of Maner- 
divy, Pems., spinster.^ 

Apr. 26. John William, farmer, and Elizabeth James, widow, both of 
the parish of Llandilofawr, Carms. ^ 

May 5. Rees Price of the parish of Llandingat, Carms., yeoman, 
and Mary Harry of the parish of Llanvihangel Rhoseycom, 
Carms., widow. ^ 

May 10. John Evans, mariner, and Mary Rees, spinster, both of the 
parish of Llanstephan, Carms. ^ B. by said John Evans ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 10. Francis Grant of the parish of Laughame, Carms., victualler, 
and Elizabeth Morrice of the parish of Llanginning, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said Francis Grant ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

May 10. William Thomas of the parish of Amroth, Pems., gent., and 
Mary Jones of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms., spinster/ 
B. by said William Thomas ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 17. Walter Mansel, farmer, and Elizabeth Morgan, widow, both 
of the parish of Kidwelly, Carms. ^ 

May 17. Thomas Rees of the parish of Killie Ayron, Cards., mercer, 
ana Mary Lloyd of the parish of Kilkennin, Cards., spinster. 
B. by said Thomas Rees ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 17. Richard Richards, farmer, and Anne John, spinster, both of 
the parish of Laughame, Carms. ^ B. by said Richard 
Richards ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

May 20. David Evans of the parish of Pencarreg, Carms., farmer, 
and Elizabeth Williams, aged 20, of the parish of Llany- 
byther, Carms., spinster.^ With consent of her father, 
Thomas Williams. 

May 20. Rees Francis, sawyer, and Catharine Davies, spinster, both 
of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms. ^ B. by said Rees 
Francis ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

i Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



ig2 Marriage Bonds mid Fiats, 1788. 

May 31. John Williams, farmer, and Elizabeth Jones, widow, both of 
the parish of Abergwilly, Carmis.'' 

Jun. 7. Patrick Newlan, late of Ireland, but now of the parish of 
St. Clears, Carms., forester, and Mary Williams of the parish 
of Llangennin, Carms., widow. ^ 

Jun. 10. Charles Pryse, gent., and Jane Richards, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanygwrf on , Cards. ^ B. by said Charles 
Prj'se. 

Jun. 18. John Hughes of the parish of Llanwnnen, Cards., gent., and 
Bridget Evans of the parish of Llanvihangel Generglin, 
Cards., spinster. B. by said John Hughes ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 

Jul. 26. John Evans of the parish of Lanarthney, Carms., yeoman, 
and Margaret Edward of the parish of Llanfynith, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said John Evans ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Jul. 29. Thomas John of the parish of Llandewy Brevy, Cards., 
farmer, and Anne Owen of the parish of Llanwennog, Cards., 
widow. ^ 

Aug. I . William Abel, yeoman, and Mary William, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanstephan, Carms. ^ B. by said William 
Abel ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Aug. 2. Jonathan Jones of the parish of Bettws, Carms., farmer, and 
Elizabeth Jones of the parish of Llanguke, Glam., spinster.^ 

Aug. 4. Lewis Evans, aged 29 years, of the parish of Meline, Perns., 
and Mary Morris of the parish of Whitechurch, Pems., 
widow. At Whitechurch.^ 

Aug. 7. William Howell of the parish of Trelech ar Bettws, Carms., 
farmer, and Mary Jones of the parish of Cwnwill Elvet. 
Carms., spinster.^ B. by said William Howell and John, 
Jones of the said parish of ConwU Elvet, farmer ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Aug. 7. Lewis Pryse, gent., and Mary Lloyd, spinster, both of the 
parish of Llanycruise, Carms.^ 

Aug. 12. Jenkin Davies of the parish of Kellan, Cards., gent., and 
Jane Edmond of the parish of Llampeter pont Stephen, 
Cards., spinster. '^ B. by said Jenkin Davies and Thomas 
Williams of the said parish of Llampiter pont Stephen ; 
witness : N. Morgan, notary public. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 
* Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 
^ Fiat issued by John Evans, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1788. 193 

Aug. 12. William Davios of the parish of Llangihangel Arath, Carms., 
farmer, aud Margaret Morgan of the parish of Llandewy 
Brevy, Cards., spiuster.' B. by said William Davits. 

Aug. 18. George Thomas, gent., and Rachel Davies, widow, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ 

Aug. 26. David Griffith, farmer, and Mary Davies, widow, both of 
the parish of Pembrin, Cards. ^ 

Aug. 30. Henry Griffiths, esq., aud Anue Griffies, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.* 

Sep. 3. David Davies of the parish of Llanstephan, Carms., gent., 
and ]Mary Jeremy of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said David Davies ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 4. William Garrett of the parish of Llandilovawr, Carms., 
yeoman, aud Ann Thomas of the parish of St. Peter, Car- 
marthen, spinster.^ B. by said William Garrett; witness: 
Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 8. Benjamin Griffith of the parish of Llandeveilog, Carms., 
farmer, and Rebecca Lewis of the parish of St. Peter, Car- 
marthen, spinster.^ B. by said Benjamin Griffith ; witness: 
Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 9. David Lewis, yeoman, and Mary Wilkin, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.* B. by said David 
Lewis ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 20. David Davies, farmer, and Jane Thomas, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llanarthney, Carms. '^ B. by said David 
Davies ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 22- David Amos of the parish of Llanybydder, Carms., pedler, 
and Rachel Jones of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
spinster.^ B. by said David Amos and William Jones of 
Carmarthen, pig-drover ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Sep. 29. John Davies, mariner, and Arrabella Rees, spinster, both of 
the parish of Laughame, Carms. ^ B. by said John Davies ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. I. William Evans of the parish of Llangoedmore, Cards., 
farmer, and Anne Davies of the parish of Penbryn, Cards., 
spinster. B. by said William Evans and John Davies of the 
parish of Troedyroyr, Cards., farmer ; witness : Dan, Wil- 
liams. 

Oct. I, Thomas Rees of the parish of Abergwilly, yeoman, and 
Anne Evans of Carmarthen, widow. ^ 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur.' 
' Fiat issued by John Rogers, Sur'. 
M 



194 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1788. 

Oct. 6. Stephen Philipps, mariner, and Elizabeth White, spinster, 
both of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.^ B. by said 
Stephen White states that the name of the bride was 'Alice ' 
White ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 13. John Vaughan of the parish of Llanfihangel Ystrad, Cards., 
esq., and Jane Evans of the parish of Llanwenog, Cards., 
spinster.^ 

Oct. 17. David Harris, yeoman, and Elizabeth Lewis, widow, both 
of the parish of Llangunnor, Carms.^ 

Oct. 20. George Davies of the parish of Merthyr, Carms., farmer, 
and Mary WiUiams of the parish of Mydrim, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by William Morris of Carmarthen, victualler ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 20. Joseph Edwards of the parish of Conwilgaio, Carms., farmer, 
and Mary Harris of the parish of Llanwrda, Carms., spin- 
ster.^ B. by said Joseph Edward ; witness: Dan. Williams. 

Oct. 25. David Hopkins of the parish of Llanfihangel Aberbythich, 
Carms., farmer, and Eleonor Jenkins of the parish of Llan- 
arthney, Carms., widow. ^ 

Nov. I. Richard Evan of the parish of St. Ishmael, Carms., farmer, 
and Anne Jenkins of the parish of Llangain, Carms., widow. ^ 

Nov. I. William Saer of the parish of Llaughame, Carms., farmer, 
and Esther Powell of the parish of Llansidumen, Carms., 
spinster.^ B. by said William Saer and Michael Saer of the 
said parish of Laugharne, farmer ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Nov. 4. Theophilus Philip of the parish of PlenUan Amgoed, Carms., 
farmer, and Elizabeth James of the parish of Llanfimach, 
Pems., widow. ^ 

Nov. 6. Morgan Prytherch, farmer, and Margaret Isaac, spinster, 
both of the parish of LlandHofawr, Carms. ^ B. by said 
Morgan Prytherch. 

Nov. 6. David Williams, yeoman, and Bridget Williams, spinster, 
both of the parish of Llansawel, Carms.' 

Nov. 7. Evan David of the parish of Llanwennog, Cards., farmer, 
and Anne Jones of the parish of Llanybyther, Carms., spin- 
ster.' B. by said Evan David and John David of the said 
parish of Llanwennog, farmer ; witness : N. Morgan, 
notary public. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1788. 195 

Nov. 8. John Rees of the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, yeoman, 
and Elizabeth Jones of the parish of Llandeveylog, Carms., 
spinster.' B. by said John Rees ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 8. David Thomas, farmer, and ilary Jenkins, widow, both of 
the parish of Llaneg^vad, Carms.' 

Nov. 12. John GriflSth of the parish of Llanfihangel Aberbythich, 
Carms., gtnt., and Hannah Jenkins of the parish of St. 
Peter, Carmarthen.' B. by said John Grif&th ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 17. William Morris, gent., and Marj- Evans, spinster, both of 
the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen.' B. by said William 
Morris and David Morris of Carmarthen, banker ; witness : 
Dan. Williams. 

Nov. 19. John Rees of the parish of Llangathen, Carms., farmer, and 
Mar>' Griffith of the parish of Llanegwad, widow.' 

Nov. 24. David Owen of the parish of Llanelly, Carms., farmer, and 
Gwenllian Davies of the parish of Llangendeirne, Carms., 
widow.' 

Nov. 27. John Lodwick of the parish of Llangunnor, Carms., farmer, 
and Mar)' Williams cf the parish of St. Peter, Carmarthen, 
widow.' 

Nov. 28. Thomas Evans, farmer, and Sarah John, spinster, both of 
the parish of Liandebydder, Carms.' B. by said Thomas 
Evans and William Evans of the said parish, farmer ; 
witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 4. David Thomas of the parish of Llangunnor, Carms., yeo- 
man, and Anne Owen of the parish of Llanarthney, Carms., 
spinster.' B. by said David Thomas and Thomas Owen of 
the parish of Llanarthney. 

Dec. 5. William Jones of the parish of Llanwrda, Carms., gent., and 
Margaret Jones of the parish of Llanfair Cledoge, Cards., 
spinster.' B. by said William Jones ; witness : Dan. Wil- 
liams. 

Dec. 8. Rees Jenkins of the parish of Kilrhedin, Carms., farmer, 
and Rachel Harris of the parish of Kennarth, Carms., 
widow.' 

Dec. 8. David Jeremy of the parish of Abergwilly, Carms., farmer, 
and Marj' Philipps of the parish of Llangunner, Carms., 
aged 17 years.' With consent of her mother. B. by said 
David Jeremy. 

1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



196 Marriage Bonds and Fiats, 1788. 

Dec. 10. John Richard, farmer, and Rachel Thomas, spmster, both 
of the parish of Llansawel, Carms.^ B. by said John Rich- 
ards and Joseph James of the said parish of Llansawel, 
clerk ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. II. David William, collier, and Elizabeth Daniel, spinster, both 
of the parish of Pembrey, Carms.^ 

Dec. 24. John Harris, yeom.an, and Mary John, spinster, both of 
Carmarthen.^ B. by said John Harries and William Davies 
of Carmarthen, trumpeter ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 27. Morgan Williams, gent., and Jane Purser, spinster, both of 
the parish of Llangaddock, Carms.^ B. by said Morgan 
Williams and David Thomas of the parish of Abergwilly, 
Carms., victtialler ; witness : Dan. Williams. 

Dec. 29. John Stacey, mercer, and Anne Williams, spinster, both of 
Carmarthen.^ B. by said John Stacey ; witness : Dan. 
Williams. 



1 Fiat issued by W. Higgs Barker, Sur'. 



[To he continued in Vol. X.] 



Local History from a Printer's File 

By JOHN BALLINGER, C.B.E., M.A. 



A few years ago (about 1912) I went with Mr. Herbert 
M. Vaughan to the office of the Tivyside Advertiser, 
Cardigan, and inquired for the printer's old files. We 
were received very courteously by Mr. Thomas, the 
grandson of the founder of the printing business, and 
eventually found in an attic thickly hung with cob- 
webs, the files ranging from 1825 to 1865. Mr. Thomas 
readily agreed to send the files to the National Library, 
no doubt wondering that such ' lumber ' should be 
accepted. 

The work of cleaning and sorting the papers took a 
considerable time. Many were not only dirty, but had 
suffered from rats, mice, and insects. 

A printing office is required by law to keep for a specified 
time a copy of everything it prints. This is generally 
done by ' stabbing ' a copy of the printed job (often 
with the MS. copy) on a wire file 4 to 5 feet in length 
with a wooden stop at the bottom, and a bent-over 
top with a sharp point for piercing the paper, exactly 
the pattern of the wire file often used for accounts and 
other papers, only much larger. The usual plan is to 
use a file for each year, starting with the new year. 

The Cardigan printer's files yielded a rich harvest of 
documents illustrating the life of the district during the 
interesting period following the end of the Napoleonic 
wars, and the coming of the railways and other con- 
veniences which have changed the conditions of life even 
in remote places. 

In quoting from the documents the punctuation and 
capitals of the originals have to some extent been pre- 



igS Local History from a Printer's File. 

served, inaccurate though they often are, and no correc- 
tion of faulty grammar has been attempted. The long 
series of documents dealing with the coasting trade are 
important as showing the extent of that trade at one 
time, and the efforts to keep it going when other transport 
facilities began to improve. In this connection the 
valuable account of Dewisland Coasters in 1751 ^ by Mr. 
Francis Green should be referred to. It supplies details 
of the nature of the cargoes carried by these coasting 
traders, not obtainable from the very different series 
of papers here dealt with. 

A glimpse of the interest which is always excited by 
the abnormal in nature is obtained from a quarto broad- 
side advertising the Porcupine Lad. ' A wonderful display 
of nature. One of the greatest human curiosities in the 
whole world, the Cambrian Porcupine Lad, who is a fine 
healthy boy, of quick understanding, and amiable temper, 
nine years of age, three feet two inches high, born of 
Welsh parents, in the parish of Kilrhedin, Pembroke- 
shire, whose body (except his Face and the Palms of 
his Hands) is covered with a Dark Prickl}'^ Substance, 
resembling the Coat of a Hedgehog or Porcupine, which 
grows to the length of half an inch, then falls off, leaving 
the root in the flesh, and grows again ; it may be burned 
or clipped off without injury. He is a wonder to all 
Physicians and Naturalists ; and all that have seen him 
testify that they never saw the like. He will be ex- 
hibited [a blank space for inserting the name of the 
place]. Prices : — Ladies and Gentlemen 6d. ; Working 
People 3d. ; Children 2d. N.B. — Families or Schools 
may be waited upon at their residence if required.' 

The date of this is 1840. Poor little boy ! 

Portraits in profile. Before photography was dis- 
covered, about the middle of the nineteenth century'-, 
the profile artist, who cut portraits in outline in black 

1 West Wales Hist. Records, Vol. VIII., p. 159—176. 



Local History from a Printer's File. 199 

paper, had an important place. Many examples of the 
art survive in old houses, and they ought to be carefully 
preserved. In the year 1848 the Artist of the Hubard 
Profile Gallery announced a stay of two weeks in Cardigan, 
at Mr. Davies', Watch Maker, High Street. 'He will 
make likenesses in every variety of style and price, from 
the simple Bust at is. (Frame and Glass included), to 
the elaborate whole length, or seated Figures, from 2/6 
to £1 IIS. 6d. He will make portraits of horses, dogs, 
etc' Then follows a long list of local families and celebri- 
ties who had given him their patronage during his stay 
at Haverfordwest. 

Gas Lighting. A notice with regard to the introduction 
of gas-lighting for the town of Cardigan is dated August, 
1859, and it would appear from other papers that the 
gas-lighting proposal went forward, the inhabitants of 
the town being invited to take up shares in the Gas 
company. 

Education. The papers relating to education are 
exceptionall}^ interesting, and deal with the Grammar 
School, the National School 1827, the British School 
1858, and private schools. Under the latter is included 
' Parnassus School, a classical and commercial seminary, 
opened at Eglwyserow in the year 1831, under the 
management of [the Rev.] D. Davies, elk., and assistants ' ; 
while Mr. Morris announces to the nobility, gentry, and 
inhabitants of the ancient borough of Cardigan and its 
vicinity, that he has just opened ' For short period 
only ' an institution for teaching : — 

s d 
Penmanship in six easy lessons . . . . 10 6 

Stenography in four ditto . . . . . . 10 6 

Ready reckoning or tradesmen's arithmetic 

in six ditto . . . . . . . . . . 70 

The teaching rooms were at Mr. William Edwards's, 
sail-maker, Pendre. Ladies attended from 9 to 10 in 



200 Local History from a Printer's File. 

the morning, and from 3 to 4 in the afternoon. Gentle- 
men from 7 to 8 in the morning, and from 5 to half past 
6 in the evening. The other part of the da^^ is appro- 
priated to attend families. A strenuous day for the 
teacher. The date is 1831. Some papers relate to the 
circulating charity schools, and some to the Education 
Board for the Archdeaconr3^ of Cardigan. 

Bookbinders. There is a small label dated as being 
printed May 3, 1826, which states that ' Thomas John, 
Book-binder, Cardigan, thanks the inhabitants of the 
town and its vicinity for the liberal support,' and so on. 
In October of the same year David Williams, Book-binder, 
begs most respectfully to acquaint the inhabitants 
' that he has just commenced Business in the above line, 
and hopes by attention to merit their encouragement.' 
It is difficult to conceive how two book-binders could 
earn a living in Cardigan in those days. So far as the 
files disclose they had no competitor until 1841, when 
B. James and E. Morris commenced business in Bridge 
Street, while seven years later, 1848, Benjamin Davies, 
' commenced business ' in the same street, and in 1850 we 
gather that the encouragement I. Edwards had already 
received from the Gentry of Cardigan and its neighbour- 
hood, had induced him to commence Business in 
partnership with Mr. Tiley. Edwards and Tiley 
not only offered ' neat and elegant binding,' but also 
described themselves as ' Machine Rulers,' possibly 
fixing a time for the first setting up in Cardigan of a 
machine for paper-ruling. Another circular announces 
that John Jones, bookbinder, ' has resumed business in 
his native place.' The date is 1858. The word ' resumed ' 
is a trifle ambiguous. The recovery of a list of book- 
binders who followed their craft in Cardigan from 1826 
to 1858 or later is useful. 

Book Society. The file contains a number of documents 
relating to the Cardigan Book Society, including the 



Local History f/oin a Printer's File. 201 

rules and lists of members covering most of the years 
from 1838 — 1865. Each year the books were put up to 
auction at the annual meeting ; printed lists of the books 
sold are on the file. The Book vSociety was started long 
before 1838. Its operations were continued for a full 
century, and only ceased in quite recent years. The name 
was changed about i860 to the Cardigan Reading Society. 
There was another organisation, the Cardigan new Read- 
ing Society in existence in 1851, possibly earlier, it had 
twelve members, and may only have existed for a few 
years. 

Literary, Scientific, and Mechanics Lnstitute. This 
institution, founded in 1847 is represented on the file by 
some papers, including a printed circular, undated, 
setting out the aims and objects of the institution, and 
a small broadside calling the annual meeting of members 
for 27th Dec, 1852. In i860 Titus Lewis, Esq., F.S.A., 
is announced to give a popular lecture at the Guildhall, 
the proceeds to be applied towards fitting up a new room, 
and in the following year Robert Fowler, Esq., M.D. of 
London, gave two lectures in aid of the funds, ' On the 
distinguishing character of organized being.' The kind 
of lectures inflicted upon the people of Cardigan at an 
earlier date is shown by broadsides dated 1826, announc- 
ing lectures by G. ]\IcGregor Campbell, A.M., etc., who 
offered as his topic, ' Religious, Civil, and Political 
Economy,' not in one, but a series of lectures, evidently 
as many as the public could be induced to pay for, front 
seats 2/-, second seats i/-, each reduced later to half. 
Evidently Mr. McGregor did not receive the encourage- 
ment he desired, notwithstanding that he relieved what 
must have been very dull discourses with ' Sacred Music, 
Anthems, etc., exemplified on the German Flute.' 

In spite of the lure of the German Flute the people of 
Cardigan were shy, as may be gathered from another 
broadside by which Mr. Campbell has the honour of 
informing the respectable Gentlemen who did him the 



202 Local History from a Printer's File. 

kindness of attending at the Hall, last evening, that 
he intends (for the last time) to make his last efforts, 
by endeavouring to collect a reasonable number of Audi- 
tors together, assuring them that, ' if there be but thirty 
persons present, he will positively deliver his discourse ; 
His object being a desire of courting Public enquiry ; 
he trusts and hopes that the respectable inhabitants of 
Cardigan, will afford him the opportunity of being heard.' 
(The capitals and punctuation are as in the original.) 

Road Transport. A study of transport for people and 
goods before the railways is of importance in relation 
to economic history. In order to obtain a reliable basis 
for the study of economic development or lack of develop- 
ment of any district, it is essential to have details of 
transport facilities, whether by road, rail, or sea. Re- 
cords of road transport, prior to the coming of railways, 
are already scarce. Any documents, therefore, which 
throw light on early transport, ought to be carefully 
preserved. 

The earliest document under this head is dated 
1829, but it was not printed at Cardigan, and it deals 
with Abergavenny. Benjamin Anthony informs the 
public that he has taken his son-in-law, Thomas Bevan, 
into partnership, and bespeaks a continuance of public 
patronage for the firm. A most commodious ' Tram-way 
conveyance ' has just been commenced between Hereford 
and Abergavenny, which will ensure safe and speedy 
delivery of goods to and from London, Liverpool, Man- 
chester, Birmingham, and Sheffield, at prices considerably 
below the usual stage charges. 

A circular letter, bearing date July 9th, 1831, par- 
ticularly requests attendance at a meeting to be held 
at the Town Hall, Cardigan, for the purpose of examining 
the accounts of the Regulator Coach, and to determine 
whether the coach shall continue to run. Whether the 
Regulator coach was continued, and to what place it 
went does not appear, but a little later in the same year 
a notice respectfully informs the public that a neat and 



Local History from a Prinler's File. 2 )3 

convenient stage coach to and from Cardigan and Car- 
marthen will commence running on the 3rd of October, 
and will continue to run once a week during the winter. 
Monda}" was its day from Cardigan, starting at 8 a.m. 
from the Albion Hotel, returning from the Ivy Bush at 
Carmarthen the following day at 10 a.m. Between 
Cardigan and Haverfordwest John Furlong of the Nant- 
y-ddwylan Arms drove his ' covered cart ' every other 
day, starting from Haverfordwest after the arrival of 
the Bristol Packet every Monday, Wednesday, and Fri- 
day, and from Cardigan on the alternate days. This 
was in 1840. 

The making of the South Wales railway sometime in 
the Fifties altered the line of approach to Cardigan. 
Narberth Road, the nearest railway- station, became the 
objective. Benjamin Davies, proprietor, announces that 
the Narberth Road and Cardigan Royal Mail Coach 
will leave Narberth Road station after the arrival of 
the down mail train from Paddington at 7.55 a.m., and 
the up train from Milford Haven at 8.5. Cardigan is to 
be reached at 10.48 a.m., and the coach will leave again 
at 2, arriving at Narberth Road station in time for the 
up mail from Milford Haven to Paddington, and ' for 
the Express and Third Class down trains to INIilford 
Haven.' Third class passengers were not carried in 
express trains until many 3^ears later. The notice bears 
no date, though it was before 1859. Its interest is that 
it appears to be the first daily connection between Cardi- 
gan and the outside world. In i860 a well-horsed omnibus 
is advertised to run daily from Cardigan at 9 a.m. to 
Narberth Road, returning from the latter place at 1.21 
p.m. Competition as regards coaching between Narberth 
Road and Cardigan began with the running of the service 
last referred to. A poster dated a j-ear later gives (for the 
first time) the fares charged — outside, 4/- ; inside, 6/-, 
with proportionate fares between intermediate places. 
Competition had obviousl}'^ led to a ' cut ' in the fares 
as the wording of the notice shows. 



204 Local History from a Printer's File. 

Another poster relates to an omnibus from Newport, 
Pern., on and after the 19th June, i860, starting daily 
at 7 a.m., running to Crymmych Arms, where passengers 
would transfer to the coach from Cardigan for Narberth 
Road. 

In another notice of about the same date, one John 
Thomas complains that, having commenced business as 
a General Carrier between Cardigan and Narberth Road 
Station, the railway company refuse to deliver to him 
any goods ' unless specially addressed by my waggon.' 
He goes on, * I hope you will therefore sympathise with 
me under such cruel and unjust treatment ; and be 
careful to address all your goods — Per John Thomas, the 
company and other persons having combined to mon- 
opolize the road.' 

In June, 1852, coach communication was established 
between ' Cardigan, Aberayron, and Aberystwyth, by 
Cummins, Weston, and Parker, from Cardigan every 
monday, Wednesday, and friday, returning on the alter- 
nate da^^s.' The same firm ran a coach from Cardigan via 
Fishguard to Haverfordwest and Milford Haven, three 
days weekly each way. 

Railway proiects. A notice dated Oct. 27th, 1858, 
signed b}' the Mayor of Cardigan, convenes a public 
meeting in compliance with a requisition made by 
numerous shareholders in the Carmarthen and Cardigan 
railway, for the purpose of conferring on the subject of 
the circular lately issued by the directors, giving notice 
of an extraordinary meeting at Carmarthen on the 3rd 
of November. What the trouble was is not stated, but 
a Carmarthen and Cardigan direct railway has not 3^et 
been constructed. Two posters relate to another ill- 
starred railway project, described as the ' Milford, Fish- 
guard, and Cardigan Junction railway, to complete the 
through route from Manchester to Milford with an un- 
broken narrow gauge.' In October, i860, the Mayor of 
Cardigan announces a public meeting ' to promote the 



Local History jrom a Printer' a File. 



205 



above railway project, which will be so conducive to 
the interests of this district.' The second poster, dated 
November, announces the holding of meetings for the 
same purpose, ' and for the purpose of getting persons 
to take shares therein.' Meetings were held at Kilgerran, 
Moilgrove, Eglwyswrw, Boncath, Pontreselly, lylechryd, 
Penllwyndu, St. Dogmael's, and Aberporth. At that 
time the dream of Milford as a great port for the shipment 
of Manchester goods was very much in evidence. 

Sea Transport. Neither road nor rail reflected the 
true out-look of the people of Cardigan of fifty and a 
hundred years ago. They were more familiar with the 
sea and sailing ships, small but well-built craft, which 
the seamen of the Cardigan coast knew how to handle 
in fair weather and in rough. This printer's file contains 
a wealth of documents which show the former importance 
of Cardigan as a sea-port, and the great part which the 
sea played in the lives of the people there. Vessels 
changed owners as freely in those old days as motor- 
cars and motor-cycles in ours. Over one hundred and 
thirty broadsides in this collection deal with the sale 
of ships, mainly at Cardigan, but including sales at Fish- 
guard, New Quay, St. Dogmell's, Aberaeron, Newport 
Pem., Popit, and other places in the localit3^ The vessels 
were of various sizes, the majority under fifty tons. 
A classification of size for 93 vessels sold gives the follow- 
ing result : — 



25 tons and under 
between 25 and 50 tons 
50 and 75 tons 
,, 75 and 100 tons 
100 and 150 tons 
150 and 200 tons 
over 200 tons 



13 

35 
15 
13 
13 
3 
I 



93 



2o6 Local History from a Printer's File. 

The vessel classed as over 200 tons is given in the 
sale bill as 299 tons. 

\ATiat was the nature of the carrying trade performed 
by these sea-going craft ? Some documents enable at 
least a partial answer to be made. 

;May, 1827. ' For Bristol, direct, now loading at 
Cardigan Quay, and will sail immediately ; a constant 
trader, the new fast-sailing smack, Marv, A.i. John 
Griffiths, commander (late of the trader Expedition). 
N.B. — The above named commander hereby engages to 
keep his said smack, Mary, as a regular trader between 
Bristol and Cardigan henceforth, and not to remain a 
longer period than 18 days loading at Bristol, at any one 
time (that is to say), to clear out on the i8th day after 
his entry outwards at the Customhouse there, with or 
without a full and complete cargo (reserving to himself 
the power of clearing out on any day, previous to the 
i8th day, if a full and complete cargo be on board the 
said vessel), or forfeit the sum of Twenty Pounds to any 
shipper or shippers on the said vessel from time to time. 
Due notice will be given by the Cardigan crier of the 
day of the said Trader's entry outwards at the Custom- 
house Bristol, to enable parties to know the certain day 
of departure from there.' 

A poster dated 1830 records that a meeting of mer- 
chants and shopkeepers was held to consider the best 
mode to be adopted for regulating the time for loading 
and sailing of the smacks Mary and Hero, trading between 
Cardigan and Bristol. Agreement was reached, the 
respective managing owners of the two smacks concurring. 
Each vessel was to have eighteen days after berthing at 
Bristol in which to load, after which loading was to 
cease, and the vessel proceed to Cardigan. Both vessels 
agreed that should either arrive in Bristol during the 
time the other is discharging or loading, she is not to 
take any goods on board until the time limit of the 
other has expired. The Bellman is to make known in 
Cardigan twice on two successive days the time when 



Local History from a Printer's File. 207 

each vessel is berthed at Bristol. Bach vessel was to 
unload at Cardigan with all despatch, and sail again 
for Bristol within eight days. Three merchants and 
three shop-keepers were appointed a committee to see 
that the resolutions were carried into effect. Thirty- 
eight names are appended, together with the names of 
the managing owners of the two vessels accepting the 
resolutions. 

July, 1838. ' Bristol, Loading for Cardigan, Newcastle 
Emlyn, Kenarth, Newport, Boncath, Pontreselly, Eglwys- 
wrw, and places adjacent, the new smack, Packet of 
Cardigan (a constant trader), Thomas Evans, ^Master 
(G. Young, Agent, King Street), now loading at the 
Cardigan Tier, Welch Back, and will sail in 14 days.' 
A similar notice, dated 1843, refers to the new smack 
Sarah of Cardigan, David Timothy, Master. 

In December, 1836, was issued a poster giving the 
trade list of freights from Bristol to Cardigan by the 
Cardigan traders. The schedule is too long to reproduce, 
it contains over 300 items, but it is an invaluable record 
for anyone engaged in research into economic conditions 
in the first half of the nineteenth century ; it not only 
gives the cost of transport, but also indicates the nature 
of the goods which had to be brought from other places 
to meet the district's needs, and throws some light on 
the position of Bristol as a great distributing centre 
for South Wales at that time, which may have given 
rise to the name ' Welch Back ' for one of the wharves 
there. Even greater interest attaches to the list of 
freights from Cardigan to Bristol, as showing what the 
Cardigan merchants were able to export. The list is so 
short that it can be reproduced in full — 

s d 
Butter, per cask . . . . . . . . o 10 

Barley, per quarter . . . . ..16 

Wheat, per ditto . . . . . . ..18 

Oats, per ditto . . . . . . ..11 



208 



Local History from a Printer's File. 



Rolls of leather with 5 bull or cow hides 

Bazil, per doz. 

Kips, per ditto 

Calf skins, per ditto 

Eggs in boxes, per hundred 

Paper, per ream 



o 10 

o 3 
o 4 



Bazil or Basil is sheepskin tanned, used for book- 
binding and other purposes. Kips or kip-leather, thin 
calf or other thin skins tanned, mainly used for the 
uppers of boots. 

It would appear that only three industries are 
represented in the list — farming, tanning, and paper- 
making. The inclusion of the last named suggests that 
Cardigan, like Haverfordwest, had a paper-making mill 
in those days. 

A similar freight list from Bristol to Cardigan was 
issued in December, 1852. The freights charged are 
fractionally less for some goods, but the articles included 
in the export schedule are the same, with the addition 
to the list of ' Leather per bundle of 4 hides is. 3d.' 
Rolls of leather being reduced from 2s. 3d. for 5 bull 
or cow hides to 4d. per hide. 

August, 1828. ' Now loading, at Pickle-herring Wharf, 
Southwark, London, for Cardigan, the fast-sailing smack 
Eaton, Evan Rees, Master. Persons desirous of availing 
themselves of this opportunity will apply to the Captain 
on board, or to Mr. D. Davies, Merchant, Cardigan.' 

There is another notice dated 1838 of a ' London and 
Cardigan trader, the schooner Friends, of Cardigan, John 
Thomas, Master, which is taking in goods at Pickle- 
herring wharf (London), where it will remain until the 
1st September,' after which it is to be presumed it would 
sail for Cardigan. 

August, 1841. ' At Pickle Herring Wharf, Southwark. 
Now loading for Cardigan and all places adjacent, the 
smack Maria (John Edwards, Master), having nearly 



Local History from a Printer's File. 209 

half of her cargo already on board, and will be dispatched 
in a few days. For further particulars apply to the 
Master on board, or to Mr. Betts, Wharfinger ; or on 
the Irish Walk in 'change hours.' 

An announcement dated August, 1838, headed ' Direct 
communication between Ireland and Cardigan Bay,' 
states that the Dublin and Glasgow Steam Company 
intend plying one of their beautiful and powerful new 
steamers from Dublin to Cardigan, on Friday the 24th 
inst., and from Cardigan for Cork on the following day. 
Particulars as to freight of goods and passage on board 
to be had from Mr. David James, Lion Hotel, Cardigan, 
who is authorised to treat for the same. The printed 
notice is dated eight days before the steamer is due to 
arrive, not, one would think, sufficient time for securing 
passengers and cargo. Incidentally, it is the first 
indication that steam vessels might some day displace 
the local sailing ships. The announcement received a 
cold welcome. No further reference to steam propelled 
vessels for the port of Cardigan is found until twenty- 
one years later, 1859, when the Mayor in compliance 
with a requisition from certain ratepayers convened a 
public meeting to consider the propriety of establishing 
a communication between Cardigan and Bristol by 
means of a steamer. 

Steam Packet communication between Bristol and 
Carmarthen, and between Bristol and Haverfordwest 
(and places adjacent), was established much earlier, as 
is shown by a small poster on the file. This was not 
printed at Cardigan, the imprint being ' Rose, printer.' 
The date is December, 1830. It seems from its terms 
to imply not a new, but an established service. The 
Steam Packet Frolic, Edward Jenkins, R.N., com- 
mander, is announced to sail between Bristol and 
Carmarthen, calling off Tenby, when practicable, 
to land and receive passengers, and between Bristol 
and Haverfordwest, taking goods for Milford and Pem- 
broke Dock, at shippers risk, and calling oft' Tenby when 
practicable. 

N 



210 Local History from a Printer's File. 

The times of sailing are given as follows : — 
From Bristol to Carmarthen. From Bristol to Haverford- 
Friday, December 31, 7 Morning west. 

January 14, 6 Morning Saturday, Jan. 8, i Afternoon 
January 28, 6 Morning Thursday, January 20, 10 Morning 

From Carmarthen to Bristol. From Haverfordwest to 

Tuesday, January 4, 9 Morning Bristol. 

„ „ 18, 7 Morning Tuesday, January 11, 3 Afternoon 

Monday, January 31, 7 Morning. Monday, January 24, 12 Noon 

Cabin 21/-; Steward's fee 2/-; Steerage 18/6; Horse 25/-; 4-wheel 
carriage ;^2 ; 2-wheel carriage 25/- ; Dog 3/-. 

The Frolic was described as a new vessel of ' nearly 
100 Horses Power.' It belonged to the General Steam 
Packet Co., i Quay, Bristol, the agents being Mr. Gibbon, 
Haverfordwest, and Mr. Walter Harris, Milford. No 
office or agent at Carmarthen is given. 

The file being that of a Cardigan printing office, the 
port of Cardigan naturally forms the subject of most 
of the broadsides, but a few deal with other places. One, 
dated 1826, states that the very fast sailing new smack 
Mary of Cardigan, John Griffiths, commander, is loading 
in London, lying at cotton's wharf, and will be dis- 
patched immediately direct for Milford, Haverfordwest, 
and Carmarthen. For freight or passage apply to the 
commander on board, or at the Rose and Crown Tavern, 
Horsleydown. A note at the foot of the bill supplies 
some details with regard to local transport. * N.B. — 
Should the gentlemen in and near Cardigan, be pleased 
to order their goods by the Mary, every attention will 
be paid by the commander in having them safely for- 
warded by carrier from Haverfordwest or Carmarthen, 
or by water from Milford, as vessels are daily loading 
there for Cardigan direct.' 

In the same year ' the smack Phoenix, constant trader 
from Bristol to Fishguard and Cardigan [is] now taking 
in goods at the Welch Back, Bristol, Cardigan Slip, and 
will sail in a few days, if wind and weather permit. John 



Local History from a Printer's File. 211 

James, Master. That was in the month of May. In June 
another notice of the same vessel and master, again 
lying at the Welch Back, ready to take in goods for 
22 places of which a list is given, including nearly all the 
places within a radius of twenty miles of Cardigan, 
' with many others too numerous to insert.' 

Another route from lyondon to Carmarthen is disclosed 
by a slip, undated, announcing a reduced price for the 
carriage of Teas from I/ondon to Carmarthen by way of 
Bristol and Steam Packets to Swansea twice a week : — 

If by waggon to Bristol and Steam to Swansea (in 7 
days), 9/- per cwt. 

If by Canal to Bristol and Steam to Swansea, 6/6 per cwt. 

' Performed by D. Rees & Co., Carmarthen.' 
The slip was printed by Brigstocke, Carmarthen. 

Such notices bring before the mind a vivid picture of 
the methods by which goods were transported in those 
times. Vessels loading at London or Bristol conveyed 
their very miscellaneous cargoes to Cardigan or Car- 
marthen, whence the various consignments were con- 
veyed by carriers' carts to their destination. 

Fishguard as an import centre appears in a notice, 
1826, announcing for sale a cargo consisting of ' the best 
Pine Timber in Balk, a few pieces of Oak, and a quantity 
of Lathwood from Quebec, in North America, by the 
brig Eclair. Thomas Griffiths, Commander. The cargo, 
unless disposed of at Fishguard wholesale, will be retailed 
in any quantity at prime cost ; particulars from Mr, 
Thomas Davies, Fishguard bottom, or Mr. Morse, Cardi- 
gan.' A week later the brig had arrived, and a further 
notice was issued offering for sale ' Pine in Balk, Deals, Oak 
pieces, Mast pieces (Red Pine), Spars, and Lathwood. A 
very superior sorted cargo in quality, length, and size, 
and well deserving the notice of the public, as it will be 
disposed of at reduced prices.' 

An invitation to the owners of Cardigan vessels to take 



212 Local History from a Printer's File. 

part in carrj-ing cargoes outside the regular course of 
their business is contained in a notice issued in March, 
1838 (printed at Cardigan) : — ' To owners and masters 
of vessels. Many thousand tons of Iron Ore, ready at 
the Port of Wliitehaven, to be shipped for Cardiff. Vessels 
of 200 tons burthen and under, dispatched in one tide. 
For freight particulars apply to Mr. William Steward, 
Iron Ore Ofhce, Whitehaven.' 

Emigration to America is the subject of four broadsides 
in the collection covering the years 1839 — 1841. In 
the first of these Messrs. Fitzhugh and Grimsham of 
Liverpool, proprietors of a line of packet ships trading 
from Liverpool to New York, set forth the attractions 
of their vessels, and the paternal care with which they 
provide for the comfort and convenience of their passen- 
gers. Those who desire to secure a passage are to com- 
municate with Mr. T. Davies, druggist, Cardigan, who is 
duly authorised to treat. The proprietors propose as 
soon as a sufficient number is obtained to have a steamer 
down at New Quay to take them to Liverpool, ' thereby 
saving them a great deal of expence and trouble.'^ 

Two other emigration posters run on similar lines, but 
have the distinction of being in Welsh and English. 
The date is 1841, and the agent for the shipping of 
passengers, was Mr. Benjamin Evans, Pendre, Cardigan. 
A definite date is given in the second of these posters for 
departure. The steamer for Liverpool will be at Cardigan 
on July 2nd, and will call at New Quay on the following 
day. After arriving at Liverpool it is guaranteed that 
passengers will not be detained above three da3^s before 
sailing, wind and weather permitting, or each passenger 
will be allowed one shilling per day according to Act 



1 Mr. Howell Jones of Topeka, U.S.A., whose parents emigrated 
from the neighbourhood of Llanon, Cardiganshire, when he was a 
child, told me that he remembers the journey to Aberayron, and from 
there in a small ship to Liverpool, to join the vessel for New York. 



Local History from a Printer's File. 213 

of Parliament. The names and tonnage of seven vessels 
sailing from Liverpool to New York are given ; they 
range in size from 641 to 11 40 tons. 

The details just quoted, and the wording of the posters 
suggest that emigrants found the voyage to the States 
a trying business, and that promises of improved condi- 
tions and better despatch were necessary in order to 
induce people to emigrate. 

The other emigration broadside deals with a voyage 
from Cardigan direct to New York. The date is 1840, 
and the notice is in Welsh and English. ' To emigrants to 
America ' is rendered in Welsh, ' Ymfudwyr i America.' 
The vessel is the fast-sailing first class ship Triton, 400 
tons, David Rees, Master, the owner being Mr. D. Davies, 
Merchant, Bridgend, Cardigan. This vessel, when the 
notice appeared, ' was being fitted out for emigrants,' 
and was to sail on or about the latter end of February. 
If she sailed with a full complement of passengers, the 
emigrants who went in this ' converted ' first class fast 
sailing ship probably experienced a rough time. 

Many notices dealing with the control and administra- 
tion of the town and port are on the file. The Mayor 
convenes (1841) a meeting in response to a request from 
certain ratepayers for considering the best mode of im- 
proving the harbour. Any persons digging for or Shipping 
Ballast from the beach adjoining the lands of Thomas 
Lewes Lloyd, Esq., at or near Cibwr, will be prosecuted 
(1858). All limestone, gravel, stone, slate, or rubbish, 
now lying on the banks of the river Tivy, must be removed 
within fourteen days, and all or any such matter here- 
after discharged from any vessel or vessels, trading to 
or from the port of Cardigan, must be removed . . • 
within three days after being discharged, for the better 
navigation of the said river Tivy. An}'- parties offending 
will be prosecuted (1858). The Mayor convenes a public 
meeting for April ist, 1861, for considering the pro- 



214 Local History froju a Printer's File. 

priet}' of erecting a Pier or Breakwater, near Penrhyn 
Castle, in the parish of St. Dogmells. There are various 
notices deaHng with the preservation and improving of 
the salmon fishery in the river Tivy, and also relating 
to the Cardigan Bay Fishing company. 

Notice is given (1850) that in pursuance of the instruc- 
tions of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, 
Captain John Washington, R.N., Inspector of Harbours, 
will attend at the Town Hall, Cardigan, to inquire into 
certain complaints against the owners of slate quarries 
and others, on the banks of the Tivy, of causing damage 
to the navigation of that river, and the harbour of Cardi- 
gan, by allowing the refuse of the quarries to fall into 
the stream .... all persons interested are invited to 
attend. 

April, 1827. ' A Caution. Whereas the sloop Friendship 
of Cardigan, Richard Finch, Master, is lost between New 
Quay and Lansantfraed ; as part of the wreck has not 
come ashore yet, the mast, riggins, and other materials 
that belong to the said sloop is expected ; Therefore, this 
is to give notice that whosoever will pick them up will 
be rewarded for their trouble ; but whosoever will 
conceal the said property will be prosecuted according to 
law. Signed, W. Finch, Wm. James, Wm. Davies, Thos. 
Thomas.' 

A notice issued in 1826 b}^ the Customs officer deals 
with licenses for navigation. ' Notice to Mariners. Acts 
6th Geo. IV. Cap. 108 and no. That from and after 
the 5th January, 1826, all vessels, not square-rigged, and 
all boats whatever (except such as are used solely in 
owners and in land navigations), be subject to seizure 
and forfeiture, unless the owners thereof shall have 
obtained a licence for navigating the same from the 
commissioners of His Majesty's Customs ; and the owners 
of such vessels and boats are also required to have the 
name painted in white or yellow letters, upon a black 



Local History from a Printer's File. 215 

ground on some conspicuous part of the stern, and the 
port to which she belongs, in a distinct and legible manner, 
or the owner or master shall forfeit the sum of one hundred 
pounds.' 

A notice dated Dec. 11, 1826, deals with a co-operative 
fund for the benefit of seamen and their dependents. 
It runs — ' Port of Cardigan. To ship-owners and Masters. 
In pursuance of the Act of Parliament passed in the 
20th year of the reign of King George the 2nd. Intituled 
' an Act for the relief and support of maimed and disabled 
seamen, and the widows and children of such as shall 
be killed, slain, or drowned in the Merchant Service. 
Notice is hereby given that a general meeting will be held 
at the Town Hall, in the town of Cardigan, on Thursday, 
the 4th day of January next, at eleven o'clock in the 
forenoon, for the purpose of appointing Fifteen Persons 
to be local Trustees for the collection and application 
of the sixpence per month, payable by all seamen, em- 
ployed in merchant ships and vessels belonging to the 
Port of Cardigan.' 

The contributions of the seamen were paid through 
the Master or Owner of a vessel, who it may be presumed 
deducted the amounts from the men's wages, an early 
example of the ' levy ' in general use to-day in the South 
Wales coal-field. That the contributions were not always 
paid promptly appears from a printed notice of which 
200 copies were printed in 1827. 

Sir, 

I beg to inform you, the Master of the 
has not paid the money due to the merchant seaman's 
fund since and as the Master or Owner are 

subject to the forfeiture of twenty pounds for such 
neglect, you will therefore be proceeded against, unless 
immediate!}' discharged. I am. Sir, your humble servant, 
Richard Dickens, Collector of the said fund, at the Port 
of Cardigan. 



2i6 Local History from a Prinier's File. 

The fund appeared to be localised at the several ports. 
A later Act (iv. — v. William IV.) established the Corpora- 
tion for the relief of seamen, and fixed the contributions 
at 2/- per month for masters, and i/- per month for each 
other person employed on the ship. 



[To he continued in Vol. X.) 







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Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Among the Lay Subsidies at the Public Record Office 
is a Roll containing particulars of the Hearth Tax levied 
on the householders in Pembrokeshire in the year 1670. 
This document is extremely interesting, as it gives 
practically a complete list of the number of inhabited 
houses in each parish in the county, and also the names 
of the householders then occupying them, and as it 
states the number of the hearths in each house, it is 
possible to form some idea of the size of the more im- 
portant residences in the county in 1670. In the Roll 
the householders in each parish are divided into two 
classes, ' Persons Liable ' and ' Paupers Certified,' and 
the number of the hearths are given in Roman numerals. 
In the copy of the Roll given below modern figures are 
substituted for the Roman numerals. The footnotes 
are supplied by the Editor. 

COUNTY OF PEMBROKE. 

Hearth Tax. 22 Car. II. 1 670. 

A duplicate of the Booke or Roll of the Accounts of 
all hearthes and stoves in all the houses, edifices, lodgings 
and chambers in the severall parishes within the county 
of Pembroke, taken in the yeare of our Lord God, one 
thousand six hundred and seventy, and examined b}^ the 
King's Majesties officers appointed for that purpose, 
and the petty constables of the severall parishes within 
the said county by vertue of severall Acts of Parliament 
for the collecting and leavying the revenue ariseing by 
hearthes, and certified and returned to the Justices of 
the Peace att the generall Sessions of the Peace holden 
for the said county the tenth day of January in the two 
and twentith yeare of his said Majestic 's raigne, and there 



2l8 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



approved of by the Justices of the Peace of the said 
county whose names are underwritten and theire associ- 
ates, and to be certified to His Majestie's Remembrancer 
in the Exchequer, according to the said Acts of Parlia- 
ment. 

KILGARRON HUNDRED. 



Lantood Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 



Hearths. 



Phillipp Owen 
Eynon Walter 
Rice Hugh 
John Griffith 
Philip Owen 
Rees Mathias 
Robert David 
John Thomas 
David James 
John Sambroke 
Rice Thomas 
Richard Ford 
William Thomas 
George Lewis 
Morgan John 
Eynon John 
James Martin 
Evan John Lewhelin 
William Devonalt^ 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

George Morice . 
John Rees 
Rees Thomas 
Thomas David 
John Thomas 
Evan John Phillipps 
Rees Griffith 
William Devonalt 
Rees Harry 
Luce Evan 
George William 



Bridell Parish, 



PERSONS 

Thomas Griffith 
James Phillip 
Howell Morice . 
David Robert . 
William Gwynn 
Thomas Wil iam 
Thomas Jones . 
David Bowen 
Thomas Gwyn 
Owen William . 
Thomas Beavan 
Morice Thomas 
William Thomas 
James David 
Thomas James 



PAUPERS 

Thomas Morgan 
Thomas ap Thomas 
John Hughes 
Morgan Thomas 
John Jenkin, smith 
Alice Pilmoore 
Thomas David 
David John 
Thomas Bevan Morice 
Gwynllyan Bowen 
Thomas Morice 
Morice Jenkin . 
John Phillip 
Hugh Richard 
Morgan Thomas 



LYABLE. 

Hearths. 
I 
2 
I 
I 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



His will was proved on 30 May, 1704. 



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HirSBVSIAD 

I'ir.Cyhoedd. 

V 

Yr \vyf fi Stephen Thomas, yn ngwasanaeth Mr. Levi Philfips, Siop'rt'r,- 
Aberleifi, yn tystio i'r Cyhoedd nadoes ilira gwiriooedd yn y dywediad disail a daenir 
At hyd y wlad, sef yw hyny, fy mod yn adnabod y dyn a vmosododd arnaf ar y 
ffordd o'r Gawse, (LlaiUwd) i Abcrteifi, ary 30ain lonawr d'iweddaf; ac mai Davia 
James, Tafannvr, Cross Way, ger Rhydcarnvven, oedd hwnw. Ni ddywedais, ac nia, 
gallaswn ddywedyd liyny, am nas gw^n pwy oedd; on-d credwyf mai nid David James 
ydoedd, oblegyd ei ibd yn llai o gorpholneth na'r ua a ymosododd arnaf, ac hefydf" 
cheiAVydd mae ya Saenoneg y llefarai hWnW ■*^rthyf.- 
' Arwyddwyd,- " 

STEPEIES TfifOMAS. 
JtlaVvrlh 16eg, 1849. -^ 

Yr wyf fi Thomas Llewellin, Tredefaid, yn hysbysu y Cyhoedd nad oes urt 
gair wirionedd yn y chwedl a I'ynegir g-.in rai, meddynt, ar hyd y gymmydogaeth 
hon, sef fy mod wedi dala dyn yn lledrata yn fy nh}>, ac mai y David James uchod 
ydoedd. Ni bu lleidr yn fy nh^ i, o ganlyniad nis gall y cyFryw gyhuddiad fod ya 
wirionedd. Blin fod ceiwyddau mor Uiosog yn ngwlad y Beiblau. Cofied y cel- 
■wyddwyr hyn ohynailan eiriau Sorompn; — '' Najeddwl ddrwg yn erby'n dij gyitmydog , 
ac yntau yn trigo yn ddio/al yn dy ymyl" 

Arwyddwyd, 

TH0](IAS tLEtVELLlN. 
Mawrth I7eg, 1849. 



l*vvy by nag a ddywedo rhagllaw fy modi yn etiog o ua 
or Cjhuddiadau uchod, a gospir yn ol Uymder eithaf y Gyf- 
raith: ae yr Wyf yn addaw Pmm« o wobrwy i'r neb' a dystia 
glywed o bono arall yn dywedyd hyny, fel ag i'w ddwyn 

DAVID JAMESv 



Isaac Thomas, ArgrafTydd/ Aberteift. , . 

FURTHER GLEANINGS FROM A PRINTER'S FILE. 

Plate III (reduced) 



To face p. 219.] 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



219 



Bridell Parish (continued.) 

Hearth 

Thomas David, taylor 

Hugh Lloyd 

George Lewis 

Morice Richard .... 
Anne Marsh 

Llanihangell and Llan- 
golman Parish/ 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Morice Morgan 

David Rees Grifi&th 

Llewhelin Rees 

Thomas Phillip William 

James David Morice 

Morice Thomas 

Thomas John 

John Thomas 

Thomas Jones 

David Lewis 

John ap John 

Thomas James 

Thomas Jones 

Thomas William David 

James Lloyd, esq 

Llewhelin David .... 2 

David Thomas .... 2 

Morgan John i 



Hearths. 



PAUPERS. 



James Rees 
Thomas James 
Humphrey John 
James Evan 



William David 
Rees Young 
Thomas Harry 
David Thomas 
John James 
John Thomas . 
William Phillips 
Rees John 
John ap John . 
Margarett Rees 
Evan Thomas 
Thomas John 
Roger Griffith . 
James John 
Morgan David 
Evan David 
Jennett Rees 
Evan Phillipps 
Jenkin Lloyd 



Kilgarron Towne and 
Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

John Richard 2 

Thomas John i 

Griffith Robert . . . . i 

Warren Thomas' . . . . i 

Thomas Jones 4 

Rees David 2 

David Evan i 

Thomas Bevan 2 

Mary Evan i 

Jenkin Jones* 3 

Rees Vaushan* .... 6 



1 Llanfihangel Penbedw and Capel Colman. 

* Of Cilrhwe. 

3 He was the nephew of Francis Warren of Cilgerran, one of the 
Warrens of Trewern in the parish of Nevern. 

* The will of Jenkin Jones was proved on 25 June, 1689 ; his son 
was Theophilus Jones of Rhosygilwen. 

* Administration of his effects was granted on 27 June, 1683, at 
Carmarthen. 



220 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Kilgarron Towne & Parish 

(continued.). Hearths. 

David Parry 2 

John Garnons^ .... 2 

James Garnons* .... 2 

Jenkin Lloyd 2 

David Thomas ... i 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 
Thomas Bowen 
David Bowen . 
Thomas Robert 
Morgan Thomas 
John Morgan 
Katherine Morgan 
George Bevan . 
John Griffith . 
Richard Phillipp 
Edward Thomas 
Owen Phillip 
Richard Thomas 
Robert Rees 
David Morice . 
James Bevan 
Thomas Howell 
John Price 
David Jenkin . 
Griffith Thomas 
James David William 
Morice Morice . 
George Lloyd . 
Ellen or James . 
George Francis 
Harry John 
Thomas Pritchard 
John Humphrey 
James David 
Mary Phillipp . 



Hearths. 



Emanuell Richard 
John Jenkin 
Rees George 
Anthony John 
James Griffith . 
John Emanuell 
Richard Griffith 
Hugh Thomas 
Phillip Rees 
Richard Thomas 
John Hugh 
Owen Thomas 
Thomas Lloyd 
Rees Lloyd 
Evan Lloyd 



Manerdivy Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

John David Powell 
David Morice^ . 
John William . 
Thomas Lloyd 
Gwenllyan William 
Abell James 
John Morgan 
John Phillip 
John David Jenkin 
Jennett Lloyd 
Llewhelin Thomas 
Katherine David 
James Beavan 
Thomas John . 
John Phillip 
David Richard 
Reynald Jenkin, esq. 



1 Administration of the goods of John Garnons was granted on 3 
April, 1675. 

2 Of Pengaltyrhywe in the parish of Cilgerran. 

3 His will was proved at Carmarthen on 6 Oct., 1691. He owned 
Cilwendeg in the parish of Capel Colman. 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



221 



Manerdivj' Parish 

(continued). 
Robert Beavan 
Dorothy Vaughan 
David William 
Wenffrid Burt' 
David Llewhelin 
John Rece 
John Morgan 
Thomas Parry 
Richard Lloyd 
George David . 
Edward Morgan 
Gwenllean Howell 
Thomas Richard 
Hector Phillipps, esq.' 
Griffith Thomas 
Anne David 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Griffith James 
Rees Griffith Evan 
David John Morgan 
Evan David 
Thomas John . 
Katherine Lewis 
Griffith Evan 
Griffith Lloyd . . 
Richard David, weaver 
John Thomas . 
Morice Thomas 
George John 
Thomas John Thomas 
John David 
Evan ap Beavan 
Thomas Griffith. 



Hearths. 



Hearths. 
I 
I 
I 

3 
I 



Rees ap Owen 
Roes ap John 
Morgan Rees 
John Jenkin 
Lewis William 
Vincent John 
Thomas Thomas 
Elizabeth Morice 



Clydey Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

David Griffith . . 
James Vaughan, clerk 
Owen James Morgan 
James William 
Thomas Morice 
David Llewhelin 
John James, smith 
Morgan Owen . 
Evan David 
Thomas Jenkin 
Margarett Jenkin 
Thomas ap Evan 
David John of Penygloy 
James Thomas 
Morice William 
David Owen 
Tobias Saunders^ 
David Morgans, esq.* 
John Thomas James 
Mary Thomas, widow 
James Richard 
David Morgan, gent.* 



1 She was either the daughter of Thos. Jones of Dolaucothi, co. 
Carmarthen, and wife of Robert Birt of Llwyndyris, co. Cardigan, or 
her daughter Winifred who married William Brigstocke of Llechdwni. 

* He was the son of Hector Phillipps of Cardigan Priory. 

3 The ancestor of the Saunder's of Pentre and Glanrhydw. See 
West Wales Hist. Records, Vol II., p. i6i. 

« Of Coedllwyd. 

5 Of Blaenbilan ; his will was proved at Carmarthen on i6 May, 
1678. 



222 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Clydey Parish 

{coi\t:nued). Hearths. 

Thomas Jenldn John . . . i 
John Griffith David 

Griffith Morgan^ .... 3 

Morice David 4 

Henry David Phillip ... 2 

Morgan Thomas James . . i 

John Thomas 2 

Mathias Powell . . . . i 

David Thomas Powell . . i 

David Jenkin i 

Thomas David .... 2 

Thomas Robert . . . . i 

Morgan James William . . 2 

James Morgan . . . . i 

Thomas David .... 1 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Inon Morice 
David John 
James Griffith 
David Harry 
John Griffith 
Thomas John 
Jane Griffith 
Thomas Griffith 
Evan Lloyd 
Morgan Thomas 
Katherine Morgan 
Susan Lewis 
John Lewis 
David David Rees 
William David 
Owen Morgan . 
Morgan David . 
Anne Llewhelin 
James John 
Philip John 
Evan ap Owen 
Thomas Griffith Morgan 
Eynon David 
Griffith Rees 



Hearths. 



John Morgan 
Margarett Griffith 
Elizabeth Owen 
Mary Morgan 
James John, fiddler 
John Thomas John 
James Evan 
James Morgan 
Evan Morgan 
Morice David Bowen 
John David 
Morgan James 
David Lewis 
John Robert 
John David John . 
John Owen 
Gwenllean Morgan 
Evan John 
John Rees 
John Evan 
Jenkin David . 
Evan Rees 
Hugh Rees 
John Bevan 
John Parry 
John Thomas Lewis 
John PhiUip . . 



Penrith and Castellan 
Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Richard Jenkin 
Susan Morgan . 
David Phillip . 
John Rees Jenkin 
David Morgan . 
Nicholas Thomas 
Phillip John 
Lewis John 
Thomas Bevan 



1 Administration of the goods of Griffith Morgan was granted a 
Carmarthen on 30 June, 1674. 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



22 



J 



Penrith & Castellan Prrish 

{continued) . Hearths. 

John David Griffith 
Gwenllian Phillip 
Rees George 
David Thomas 
Alban Rees 
John Griffith . 
David Griffith . 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

David Evan 
John Griffith James 
Evan John 
Morice Phillip . 
John Rouland . 
David Morice 
Richard ap Richard 
Thomas ap Evan . 
John ap Owen Hugh 
James William 
Alice David, widow 
William David 

Kilrhedin Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 
Rice Jones i 



Rees Morgan 
James Lewis 
Morice Evan 
William Griffith 
Margarett Griffith 
Lewis David, clerk 
James Evan Thomas 
Griffith Thomas 
James Beynon 
James Beynon Thomas 
David James, clerk^ 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

John Davids 
Gwenllian Lewis 
James Evan 
Robert Rees 
David Francis . 
David Thomas 
John James 
Jennett Thomas 
Rees Lewis 
Jane Evan 
Genllian Eynon 
Katherine Evan 
David Morgan . 
Anne John, widow 



Hearths. 
I 
I 



KEMES HUNDRED. 



Whitchurch and Nant- 
gwynne Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Thomas Bevan Lewis • . i 

David Morice i 

James Owen i 

Owen Bowen 2 

William Morgan . . . . i 



Morice Ellis 
James Morgan . 
Rees William 
Katherine Picton 
Rees Thomas 
George Thomas 
George Bowen* 
Mathias George 
Phillip John 
John James 



1 He was rector of Cilrhedin ; his daughter Bridget was the wife 
of John Don Lee of Pibwr near Carmarthen. 
* Probably George Bowen of Llwyngwair. 



22-1 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Whitchurch & Nantgwynne 

Parish (continued). Hearths 

Nicholas Morgan^ 

David Lewis 

Nicholas Morgan'^ ror ye mill . i 

Thomas John William . . 2 

John David Cawey ... 3 

John William Nicholas 

William Richard 

Morice Thomas 

Thomas Jenkin 

William Miles . 

Morice Lewis 

Thomas Bowen 

John David, junior 

William Mathias .... 2 

John Thomas i 

Robert Lewis 3 

Margaret David .... 2 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Thomas, David, weaver 
Lewis Rees 
Duthgy Rees, widow 
Thomas ap Evan . 
Maude George . 
Thomas Lewis . 
John ap Evan . 
James Thomas 
James Llewhelin 
John George 
Katherine Rees 
William Rees 
John Griffith, tucker 
Evan Griffith 
William Bevan 
Neast John 
David Phillip . . 
Phillip Evan 
Howell James . 
Thomas ap Thomas 
John David Phillip 



Hearths. 



John Row 
Rees David 
Owen David Owen 
Morice Jones 
George Rees, smyth 
Edward James 
James Morgan 



Monachlogddy Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 
John Howell 
Reynald Morice 
Lewis Bowen 
Phillip Morgan 
Lewhelin Lewis 
Griffith David . 
Llewhelin William 
Howell Morgan 
Lewhelin John 
Richard Hugh . 
Griffith Thomas 
Evan Lewis 
Owen Thomas . 
WiUiam Thomas 
Richard Gibbin 
Katherine Lewis 
Rouland Powell 
Ruddrok Jenkin 
Gwynllian Thomas 
Richard Morice 
Richard Morice of Egloserrow 
Phillip David Phillip 
Lewis James 
Maude Thomas 
David Bevan 
Richard Hugh . 



PAUPERS 
Thomas David 
William Beavan 



CERTIFIED 



1 He was the son of Thomas Morgan of Whitechurch in Kemes, 
gent. 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



22- 



Monaclilogcldy Parish 

(conlinued) . 

Thomas William 

Hugh John 

La wry John 

John Pugh 

Gwynllian David, widow 

Rees Hugh 

Thomas Griffith 

James David 

Mary John, widow . 

Anne Evan 

Llewhelin ... . . 

Jennet John, widow 

David Jenkin 

Rees David 

David Lewis 

Morice John 

James David, weaver 

Rees John, cobler 

Rees Hugh, labourer . 

Margarett Lewis 



Landilo Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 



Hearths. 



Llangolman Parish. 



John Evan 
Griffith Thomas^ 
Evan Howell 
William Melcher 
Griffith Griffithes 



PAUPERS. 

None. 



PERSONS 



LYABLE. 

Hearths. 



Mary Lewis 
James Robert . 
John Lewis David 
Thomas Gibbon 
Llewhelin Lewis 
Lewis Evan Phillip 
Gwynllian Lewis 
Mary Griffith . 
Henry Griffith 
Llewhelin Lewis 
Llewhelin Rees 
Thomas Prosser 
Lewis James' 
John Lewis 
Jennet Lewis 
Lewis John 
Griffith Morice* 



I & 2 



PAUPER CERTIFIED. 

John Evan 
Griffith Evan 
John Anthony 
John William . 
William Lewis 
Thomas Howell 
George Hugh 
John William . 
Richard Thomas 
John Harry 
Maud John 
Evan Thomas . 



1 The will of Griffith Thomas, described as of Llandilovach, co Pem., 
was proved in 1652, and as his children had not adopted the settled 
surname of Thomas, it would appear that his name was inserted in 
the above list although he was dead. 

* The will of Mary Lewis, widow, was proved at Carmarthen on 31 
May, 1688. 

» The will of Lewis James was proved at Carmarthen on 12 May, 
i6g6 ; he owned land in Pennsylvania. 

* The will of Griffith Morrice was proved at Carmarthen on 18 Sept., 
1684. 

O 



220 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670 



Llangolman Parish 

(continued) . Hearths. 

Harry Phillip i 

Thomas Edward . . . . i 
Jennett David . . . . i 

Llanvirnach Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 

Griffith Howell 
Morice James . 
Phillip Thomas 
Phillip James . 
Owen Thomas . 
John Llewhelin 
John Eynon 
Tho. Reynald David 
Phillip David John 
Thomas Owens 
Lewis Thomas 
Roger Owen 
Phillip David Philli 
Elizabeth James 
David John 
John Rees Griffith 
Evan Morice 
David William 
Evan Morice 
Morice PhilUp . 
Jennett Thomas 
Duthgy John 
Lewis Richard 
John George 
Henry Morgan 
Reynald Thomas 
John Devenalch 
Reynald Thomas 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Henry Rees 
Lewis Pugh 
James Harry 



Hearths- 



James Jenkin . 
EUinor Lewis 
Johan John 
Katherine . . . 
GwynUian James 
Rees Thomas 
Lewis Richard 
David Richard 
William Robert 
Sampson John 
Morice John 
James John 
John Rees Griffith 
Richard Thomas 
Henry Phillip . 
Evan Jenkin 
Elizabeth Evan 
Lewis Edward 
Llewhelin James 
Jennett HoweU 
Katherine Will 
Maud Richard 
Thomas David Beavan 
Phillip John, tayler 
Morice James . 
John Rees Prodd[erch] 
John Rees 
Mary David 
Anne John 
John Evan 
Griffith Morice 



Meline Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

David Mathias .... 2 

Edward Owen i 

Do. his forge i 

John Deverox, William Morgan 2 

James Bowen .... 4 

Thomas PhiUipps, clerk^ . . 3 

Margarett James . . . . i 



1 Of Pontgynon. His will was proved at Carmarthen in 1686. 
* He was rector of Meline. 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Meline Parish 

(continued.) Hearths. 

William Bovven 
Widdow Phillip 
Richard Phillip 
David James 
William Howell 
Mathias Morgan 
James David 
Thomas David, smith 
Do., his forge 
Thomas ap Thomas 
James Thomas 
EUinor John 
William Bowen 
Hugh Martin 
Thomas Price . 
Mary Pryddero 
John Bowen 
John Phillip . . 
Evan David 
Jenkin Lewis, mil [ler] 
William Griffith^ . 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Llewhelin Rees 
Thomas Harry 
Thomas Rudder [ch] 
George Lewis 
Margarett Evan 
Katherine David 
George Bowen 
George Owen 
Jonathan Lewis 
William Lewis 
Anne Phillip 
Katherine Philp 
Evan Richard . 
John William Rees 
Morice Fabian 
John Phillip 



227 
Hearths. 



Ellinor Anthony 
George ap Edward 
Miles Thomas . 
Owen Luke 
David John 
Thomas David, tayler 
John Will 
Thomas William 
John Jenkin 
Edward William 
John William . 
Anne Lloyd 
John William . 
Morgan Rees 
Hugh Martin 
Richard Beynon 
Thomas ap Evan 
Henry William 
Thomas ap Evan 
Evan David 
Luke Rees 



Llanichloydog Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

David Thomas Lloyd^ . . 2 

Griffith Dedwith . . , . i 

Owen Lewis 2 

William Robert .... 2 

David Robert i 

Thomas Goodhead . . . i 

Owen Thomas 2 

John Jenkin 2 

Thomas Reynald . . . . i 

John Owen i 

John William 2 

Thomas David .... 2 

John William Griffith . . i 

Phillip Thomas . . . . i 



1 Of Penybenglog. His will was proved at Carmarthen on 13 Sept., 
1677. 

2 Probably of Cleanybeynog in the parish of Llanychllwydog. The 
will of a John Thomas Lloyd of that place was proved at Carmarthen 
on 5 Feb., 1683-4. 



22S 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Llanichloydog Parish {continued). 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

Hearths. 
Thomas ap Price 
Rouland Lloyd 
Nicholas Owen 
James Owen 
Griffith Harry . 
Richard Robert 
Watkin Morgan 
Owen Robert . 
David George . 
Jenkin Bateman 
Morice Griffith 
Nicholas David 
William John . 
Robert John 
John ap Bevan 
John Robert 

Castlebigh Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Thomas Griffith 
Thomas Griffith 
Howell Griffith 
James Vaughan 
Thomas Hardin* 
Margarett Eynon 
Jenkin Hooper . 
James Phillipps" 
John Llewhelin 
Morice Adam . 
Owen John 
Griffith William 
Thomas James 
Thomas John . 
Hugh William . 
Lewis Elliott, clerk 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

Hearths. 
Rowland Thomas . . . . i 
Rotheroe David . . . . i 

Lewis David i 

Owen Evan i 

Llanvernantygove 
Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 

John Owen, gent.* . . 
Richard Ford^ .... 
John Lewis .... 
Thomas Rees .... 
William Hyer .... 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

William Phillip 
Robert John 
John Owens 
William James 
Thomas Morice 
Owen Martin 
Jenkin David . 
Griffith Thomas 
David ap David 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

James Gwynne 
George Thomas 
David Phillip . 
John James 
John Owen Jenkin 
William Davis 
John Thomas . 
Llewhelin John 
Thomas John . 
John Griffith . 



1 Of Long Hooke. The inventory of his goods is dated 6 Oct.. 1697. 
He was the father of Moris Harding. 

2 Probably the grandson of William Phillipps of Castlebigh. and 
great grandson of Morgan Philipps of Picton Castle. 

3 He was rector of Castlebigh. 
« Of Trecoon. 

6 See West Wales Hist. Records, Vol. VII., p. 6. 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



229 



Llanvernantygove Parish 

{continued). 

Thomas Perkin 

William Morgan 

Thomas Alban 

Owen Abram 

Richard Harry 

John Robert 

John Price, clerk^ 

Gwenllian Pill . 

Evan John 

Richard Wogan 

John Griffith Nicholas 

Thomas Griffith 

Thomas Alban 

Rees Morgan 

Morice John 

Phillip John . , 

Thomas Richard 

Thomas John, tinker 

Anne Dyer 

John Morice 

William George 

David John 

Margarett John 

Henry Phillip . 

John George 

Evan Thomas . 

Thomas Morice 

Thomas David 

John George Owen 

George Owen 

Thomas Phillip 

John James Griffith 

John Harry 

Morgan Robert 

Henry Thomas 

Alexander Gwynne 

Morgan Robert 

Phillip David for Fishgard 



Hearths. 



Mill 



Phillip Richard 
John Mortimer 
David Lloyd 
Jane James 
Anne Richard Morice 
Phillip Lewis 
Thomas Owen Jenkin 
Owen John, tinker 
Rees James 
Anne Richard . 
John Evan 
Margarett Price 
Lewis Alban 
Elizabeth John 
Thomas John 
Margarett Mortymer 
William John . 
Henry Griffith . 
Jenkin Morgan 
David Davids . 
Thomas Griffith 
Owen William Harry 
Evan David 
Phillip John 
William Howell 
Henry William 
William Harry 
Francis Welch . 
William Morgan 
William Thomas 
William David 
Lewis George 
David John Phillip 
Griffith John Morice 
Phillip Griffith 
John William Harry 



Llanllawerne Parish. 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

Griffith John Robert . . . i 
John Powell i 



PERSONS LYABLE. 



Thomas David 
Anne Bateman 



1 He was Vicar of Fishguard. 



2.^0 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Llanllaweme Parish 

{continued) . Hearths. 

Eynon Bateman^ .... 3 
Owen Morice 
Arthur David . 
Thomas Bateman 
Anne John 
John David 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 
Phillip Harry 
Owen James 
Anne William 
James John 
Jenkin David 
Anne Hugh 
Griffith Harry- 
Elizabeth PhilUp 
James Gwyllim 
Jenkin David . 
Phillip Griffith 
Margarett Morice 
Thomas Owen . 
Margarett Owen 

Newcastle Parish.^ 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Thomas Evan i 

David Lewis i 

Griffith Richard . . . . i 

David Evan i 

Sibell John i 

Edward Jeffrey . . . . i 

Thomas John i 

George Robert . . . . i 

Watkin John 2 

James Rayad i 



Hearths. 
I 
I 

3 
I 



John Phillip 
Thomas Evan 
John Symyns* 
John David 
Owen William 
John Owen 
Thomas Howell 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Margarett David 
Griffith Richard 
Edward Evan . 
William Phillip 
Evan Thomas . 
Thomas David 
William Morgan 
James Richard 
Thomas Evan . 
Watkin William 
Thomas Evan . 
Phillip Evan 
Morgan Evan . 



Maenclochog Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 

Lewis William* 
David John 
John Morice, miller 
Rees Harry, tinker 
John Griffith, clerk 
William Eynon 
William Lewis 
Jane William 
John Gibby 
Thomas Edward 
John Rees 



1 His will was proved at Carmarthen on 11 Feb., 1696-7 by his 
widow, Ursula George. 

* Little Newcastle. 

' Of Colston ; his will was proved in Carmarthen on 26 May, 1709. 

* Of Bwlchyclawdd ; he married Elinor the eldest daughter of 
Thomas Vaughan, senior, of Farthingshook. 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



231 



Maenclochog Parish Hearth,. 

{continued). Hearths. Davld JameS I 


Edward David .... 

Mary WilHam 

Evan Bowen 

Jane Phillip .... 
Llewhelin Richard 


1 John Thomas i 

2 John Phillip i 

I Evan John i 

I Thomas Rosser . . . . i 
I Richard Evan t 


Thomas Vaughan^ 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 


3 John Jenkin, hooper . . . i 

Richard John r 

Owen Hugh i 


Nicholas Howell .... 
Ellinor Owen, widow 

Owen Lewis 

Margarett John .... 
Sarah Richard .... 


I Henry David i 

I Owen Hugh i 

I Henry David i 

I Owen Lewis i 

I Owen Thomas i 

Griffith Lawrence . . . i 


Henrismote Parish. 


Roger William . . . . i 
Thomas Owen . . . . i 


PERSONS LYABLE. 


Lewis Griffith i 

John William i 



William Owen 

Lewis William 

John Morice 

Thomas Bevan 

William John . 

Lewis Owen 

Griffith Lewis Dedwith 

David Lewis 

Ursula Vaughan 

David Lewis 

Margarett James 

Henry Johnes . 

Richard Morice 

William Jenkin 

George Owen John Griffith 

Jenkin Griffith 

David John 

Jane Nicholas . 

John Will . . . 

Phillip John . . . 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 
John Richard .... 



Morvill Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

William Edward 
Jenkin Llewhelin 
Owen Gwyther 
David Young . 
Thomas John . 
Richard Morice 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Gwenllian John 

Rees Edward .... 

Walter Daniell . . . 

Pontvaine Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

John Lloyd 

David Edward .... 
John Owen 



1 Of Vorlan. His will was proved at Carmarthen on 3 March, 171: 



13- 



232 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Pontvaine Parish. 

(continued). 

Elizabeth Dedwith 
Henry Nicholas 
David John 
John Lloyd 
Thomas John . 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

Thomas Rees i 

Griffith Morgan . . . . i 

Thomas Rees i 

Thomas Owen i 

Llanychaeth Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

David Thomas 
John Vaughan 
Henry Gwynne 
Thomas Rees 
Margarett John 
Thomas ap Thomas 
Eynon Francis 
Thomas Nicholas 
Hugh John 
Thomas Price . 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Hugh Mendes 
Robert Owen 
Robert John 
John Robert 
Jennett John 
Johan Thomas 
John Be van 
Robert John 
Evan John 
Lewis Rees 
Thomas Hugh 



Poncheston Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Hearths. 

Jenkin Lewis, clerk ... 2 

Lawrence Edward . . . i 

John Symins i 

Evan Symins^ and John Cor- i 

nocke 

Thomas Symins'' .... 4 

Hugh Symins^ . . . . i 

John Cornocke . . . . i 

William Griffith . . . . i 

John Morgan i 

David William . . . . i 

Morice Thomas . . . . i 

Evan David i 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

Evan Jenkin i 

John Griffith i 

Owen William i 

Mathias Lewis i 

Dinas Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Griffith John i 

Oliver James 2 

Evan ap Bowen .... 2 

William Bowen . . . . i 

Silvanus Morice .... 2 

Rees John and Rees Mathias . i 

Arthur Robert . . . . i 

Rees John Rees Lewis . . i 

Thomas John i 

Morgan Thomas . . . . i 

John Lloyd i 

William George . . . . i 

Griffith James i 



1 Evan and Hugh Symins were brothers ; the will of Hugh Symins 
was proved at Carmarthen on 6 Oct., 1685. 

" Of Martell ; his will was proved at Carmarthen on 7 Sept., 1683. 



Pembrokeshiye Hearths in 1670. 



233 



Dinas Parish 

{continued.). Hearths. 

Owen Harry 
John Phillipps 
David Evan 
Ellen Evan 
David Griffith . 
Phillip Thomas 
David John 
Thomas Harry 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

William John Phillip 
James ap Bevan 
William Owen . 
John David 
David John Rees . 
Richard Harry 
Thomas John Harry 
Henry Evan 
Thomas David Edward 
George James . 
Thomas John Rees 
Robert Owen 
Griffith James . 
John Rees 
David John 
David Owen 
David John 
Henry Melchior 
Morgan Thomas 
Evan Harry 
John William Lloyd 
Henry David 
George Evan 
George John David 

Newport Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 
James Harry i 



Hearth. 



Thomas William 
Robert Lloyd . 
David Harry 
Jenkin William 
John ap John . 
Evan Llewhelin 
Perrett Bowen 
Griffith Harry . 
William Williams 
William Owen 
Owen Evan 
William John 
Jane Folke 
James George 
Nicholas William 
Thomas Hillier 
Morgan Phillip 
Elizabeth George 
John Evan 
George Davis, clerk 
Thomas Jones, gent 
Henry James 
Oliver James 
John Havard 
Marie Rosser 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Morgan ap Morgan 
James William 
Owen Robert 
Edward Lysa 
Johan Penry 
George John 
John Griffith Phillipp 
Samuell Morgan 
Morgan David . 
Jenett Thomas 
Evan Roch 
George William 
Elizabeth Griffith . 



1 Probably of Wenallt in the parish of Nevern, administration 
of whose goods was granted at Carmarthen on 8 Feb., 1686-7 to his 
wife Elizabeth. 

^ Administration of his goods was granted at Carmarthen on 23 
Feb., 1692-3, to his widow Eleanor. 



234 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Newport Parish 

[continued) . Hearths. 

Tho. Rees David ap Bevan 
Elinor George . 
Griffith Rees 
John William . 
Katherine James 
Nicholas William 
Elizabeth Harry 
Elizabeth Lloyd 
Jane Thomas 
Ellinor Richard 
William James 
David John 
William John . 
Thomas Pecttsall 
John William . 
Jenkin Rees 
Thomas Owen . 
William David 
James Richard 
Owen David John 
Johan James 
Richard Rees 
Phillip Harry . 
Morice Owen 
Evan Rudd[erch] 
William Rudd[erch] 
John David Evan 
Moses David 
John Lloyd 
Rees ap Rudd[erch] 
Phillip Elis . . 
Owen Bowen 
Peter Griffith . . 
Ellinor Griffith, wddow 
John Lloyd 
Anthony Morgan 
Rouland Hugh 
Elizabeth Rees 
Morice John 
Morice John 



Eglosorow Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 



Rees Ruddero . 
David John 
John Bevan 
William Nicholas . 
William Owen, junior^ 
Alexander Ford 
Rees Thomas 
Thomas Griffith 
Richard James 
Thomas George 
John Rees Prydd[erch] 
Rees Ruddero ap Rees 
Philip Bowen, clerk" 
Henry Miles 
John Griffith 
David Lewis 
Thomas Bowen 
William Jenkin 
Hugh David 
Henry Jenkin . 
John Thomas Howell 
George John Phillip 
Sampson Nicholas 
William John Powell 
George John George 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Richard Ryddero 
Richard John . 
John Rees 
David John 
James Lewis 
Elizabeth Miles 
Rees James 
Robert Thomas 
Thomas ap Thomas 
Thomas David 



Hearths. 

4 



1 Probably of Berllan. 
* Vicar of Eglwyswrw. 



Pembrokeshiye Hearths in 1670. 



235 



Eglosorow Parish 








Heartki 


[continued). Hearths. David John . . . 


I 


William Bevan . . . . i Evan Ruddrerch] 




2 


Lewis Thomas 






I James Morgan 




2 


Phillip William 






I Owen John 




. 2 


John Thomas David 






I William leroth 




I 


Ryddero Price 






I leroth John 




I 


Rees ap John . 






I George Lloyd 




2 


Rees ap John, tayler 






I Griffith William . . 




I 


Griffith Jenkin 






I David Thomas 




I 


Phillip Bevan . 






I Perrott Bowen 




I 


Thomas Morice 






I Thomas Knowles 




5 


Margarett Rees 






I Evan Thomas . 




I 


John George 






I Thomas Rudd[erch] . 




I 


Evan John 






I Thomas James 




I 


Evan David 




I 


Nevem Parish. j^^^r ! ! 




I 
8 


PERSONS LYABLE. John Tucker clerk' . 




4 


Martha Vaughan . 




I 


David Mends i Thomas Price . 




2 


Thomas Bevan 






I David John, glover 




I 


John Serman 






2 James Bowen, esq.* 




6 


William Ovk^en, esq.'' 






10 Thomas Hilier . 




I 


John Lloyd 






5 Thomas Meyricke . 




I 


Capt. William Owen 






2 Elizabeth Francis . 




2 


James John 






2 William Warren* . . 




5 


Jenkin John 






I Thomas Phillipps* 




4 


Owen Lloyd 






I Lettice Jones 




5 


EUinor Pugh 






5 Thomas Lloyd 




5 


Thomas Webbe 






4 Lewis Griffith . 




I 


EUinor Walter 






I Morgan Griffith 




5 


James Richard 






I James David, mill[er] 




I 


William Young 






4 Evan Lloyd 




I 


Evan Rees, senior 






2 George William . . . . 




I 


Owen Jenkin 






I Evan William . 




r 


Thomas Morgan 






I Morgan Lewis . 




I 


Owen Rouland 






I John Rees ap John 




I 


John William . 






I John Bowen . . . . 




3 



1 Of Henllys. 

* Son of John KnoUes of Crygmore, co. Cardigan ; 
Lettice the daughter of Thomas Jones of Wenallt. 

s Vicar of Nevern. 

* Of Llwyngwair. 

* Of Trewern. 

* Of Pentre-Evan. 



he married 



236 



Pemhrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Nevem Parish 

(continued) . Hearths. 

Do. where Will. Thomas lived 1 
Lewis ap Bevan . . . . i 
Thomas Shelby . . . . i 
Richard Hellier . . . . i 

David James 2 

Mathias Thomas John . . 4 
Katherine George 

Maude James 3 

George James i 

Thomas James .... 2 

David Rosser 

Henry Frees 

Thomas Richard 

George John 

William David 

John Thomas John 

Thomas ap Thomas 

David Bennett 

Rowland Thomas 

Griffith Parry . 

Rees Luke, miller 

Alban Warren . 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED. 

William Yerwarth 
Thomas Phillip Harry 
Thomas Hugh . 
David Griffith . 
Robert James . 
Rees Thomas 
David Thomas George 
John Lewis 
Mary Thomas . 
Ellenor Thomas 
Robert James . 
David Thomas George 
Thomas Hugh . 
Thomas Phillip 
Morice David . 
William ap William 
John Edward . 
William Rees 
Ellinor Young . 



Hearths. 



Katherine Evan 
Mary Thomas . 
Lewis James 
William Bevan 
William Vince . 
Thomas Lloyd 
Duggy Picton . 
Richard William, 
Jane Watkin 
Jane Morice 
Evan John 
Reynold Phillipps 
Hugh Lewis 
Anne David 
Licky Evan 
Margarett Jones 
Peter Richard . 
Evan Owen 
David Thomas 
Lewis Thomas 
Thomas Mathias 
Mortimer . . . 
Morgan WiUiam 
George Richard 
Thomas ap Evan 
Thomas Phillipps 
Morice Owen 
Maude John 
Thomas Lloyd 
Morgan Lloyd . 
David Thomas 
Rees Richard 
Evan Thomas . 
Edward Younge 
Richard Andrew 
Katherine Morgan 
Mary William 
John Howell 
Evan Griffith 
Thomas Lewis 
John Mathias 
John Francis 
John Lewis 
Owen ap Owen 



taylc 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 16/O. 



237 



Nevern Parish 
[coHtin ueit) . 

William George 
David Griffith . 
George Roger . 
Thomas Lewis . 
William Thomas 
John William . 
Thomas ap Bowen 
Rees Younge 
John Hugh 
Jennett Thomas 
William Richard 
John David 
Maude Edward 
John Phillip 
William Powell 
Margarett Row 
David Jenkin . 
Evan Griffith 
Morice Vaughan 
John Morgan 
David George . 
John William . 
George Evan 
Phillip Evan 
Christopher David 
Thomas John . 
Phillip Evan 
Evan Younge . 
John Owen 
Griffith John . 
Evan Rees 
David ap David 
Margarett . . . 
Maude John 
Morgan Phillip 
William Jenkin 
Margarett James 
Margarett William 
Griffith Thomas 
George Miles 
John David 



Hearth 



Moninton Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 



William Rowland 
Elizabeth Lloyd' 
Henry George . 
Lewis Phillip 
John Sambrooke 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Griffith Proth[ero] 
Owen Richard . 
Edward James 
Margarett James 
Evan Hugh 
Nicholas John 
Phillip Owen 
John Owen 
James Phillip 
Morgan David 
Owen Rees 

Bayvill Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 

Lewis Bevan 
Rees Williams . 
William Rowland 
Evan Thomas . 
Rees William 
Henry Bevan 
William Gilbert 
Evan Rees 
Lodwicke Lloyd 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Herbert Thomas 
Rees Young 
William Phillip 
David Richard 
George Edward 



Hfarlhi. 
2 
2 
I 



^ Of Trevigm. 



2^s 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



Bayvill Parish 

[continued) . 

"William David ap Owen 
David William 
William ap Owen 
Thomas John . 
David Richard 
Morice John 
Evan Thomas 
Anne Sily 
Edward William 
John Hugh 
Jane David 
Miricke William 
John William 
Griffith John 
James Huten 
Dorothy Owen 



PAUPERS 



CERTIFIED. 

Hearths. 



Henry Miles, clerk 
Jane Robert 
Morgan Lloyd . 
Rees Young 
Katherine Lloyd 
Jane Richard 
Thomas David 
Evan Thomas . 
William Richard 
Owen Morgan . 
Thomas Thomas 
David Francis . 
Jennett Rees 



St. Dogmell's Parish. 



PERSONS LYABLE. 



Moilgrove Parish. 




Thomas Parry, esq. 
George James . 




6 

2 


PERSONS LYABLE. 


William Thomas .... 
William Farry, smith 


I 
I 


William Richard . . . . i 


Do. his forge 


I 


Jenkin Lloyd 
Owen Gwynne 
William Griffith, miller 






6 

4 

I 


Thomas Parry .... 

Elizabeth Poulton 

John James 


I 
2 

I 


Thomas Evans 






I 


Mary David, widow 


2 


Elizabeth Bowen . 






I 


John Bevan 


3 


Katherine David . 






I 


Rudderch John .... 


I 


Sage Lewis 






I 


David Richard Jenkin 


I 


Morice Griffith 






2 


Do. where James Mathias lived 


I 


John Griffith . . 






I 


William Rowland .... 


I 


John Evan 
John James 
Lewis Thomas 






2 
I 
2 


Jane John 
George Lewis 
Abram Evan 




I 
I 
I 


Lewis Phillipps 
Wi!iiam Griffith 






I 
I 


James Lloyd 
Francis William 




I 
I 


James Davenant . 






2 


Evan Morice 




I 


Evan William . 






1 


John Hughes 




2 


James Francis . 






I 


Francis Jones . 




2 


Anne Tucker 
Evan Bowen Lloyd 






2 

I 


John Lloyd 
Thomas William 




2 
I 


John Beynon 






I 


Mathias Thomas 




I 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



239 



St. Dogmell's Parish 

i^conlintied). 

Thomas David Griffith 

Richard Price . 

Nicholas Rowland 

Do. for Evan Young's house 

Wiliiam Rowland . 

Evan John of Llantoodc 

John Hughes 

Martin Rees 

Rees ap John 

Nicholas Davies^ 

Howell Thomas 

Thomas Rees 

James Griffith . 

William David 

Evan ap Evan Price . 

David Thomas Llewhelin 

Owen John 

William Mathias 

Thomas Nicholas . 

Hugh Thomas . 

John Samrocke 

Reynold Jenkins 

John Bevan 

David Webb . . . 

George David . 

David Thomas Parry 

James Phillips, esq.^ . 

Watkin David . 



Hearth 



Hearths. 

2 
2 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Rees Vaughan . 
Nicholas Hugh 
Henry John 
Phillip Thomas 
Ursula John 
Thomas Edward 



John Parry 
Thomas Bowen 
Griffith George 
William Rcece 
Richard Vaughan 
Rees William 
Rees Thomas David 
Richard William 
Christian Edward 
Rees Thomas 
Evan William 
James Harry 
Mary Watkin 
John David Lloyd 
John David 
Evan Hugh 
John Phillip 
Thomas David 
Evan James 
Ellen William 
Hugh Rees 
Watkin David 
David Thomas 
John Parry 
Ellen John 
Thomas Hugh 
Mary David 
Mary Harry 
John ap John 
Evan Mathias 
Rees Watkin 
James Phillip 
Owen Rees . 
Mary Lewis 
Rees James 
Grace John . 
Elizabeth David 



1 Of Penyrallt. His will dated 22 April, 1713, was proved at Car- 
marthen. 

2 Of Cardigan Priory. He was son of Hector Phillips, and a lineal 
descendant of Sir Thomas Philipps of Kilsant. 



240 



Pembrokeshire Hearths in 1670. 



ROOSB HUNDRED. 



Treffgarne Parish. 



PERSONS 



LYABLE. 

Hearths. 



Richard Browne 
Walter Page 
Morgan Peregrine 
James Higgon^ . 
Thomas Browne 
William Browne 
Richard Evans . 
George Currier, clerk' 
John Simon 

PAUPERS CERTIFIED 
Tobias Fallent . 
Henry Griffith . 
Robert Thomas 
Thomas Hughes 
Henry Browne . 
John NichoUs . 
Sage Bowen 
Jane Harry, widow 
Jane William, widow 

Lampson Parish. 

PERSONS LYABLE. 
John Barron' 2 



Heart hi. 



John Husband . 
Francis Mathias 
Phillip Moore . 
Thomas Long . 
Owen Harris 
Jenkin Warlow 
Lewis Wogan, esq. 
John Moris . 
Katherine Sayse 
David Lolocke . 
John Wilkin 
Stephen Warlow 
John Rees, miller 



PAUPERS CERTIFIED 

Richard Vale 
Rees James 
Howell Vawer . 
Howell Hough . 
Peerce Morce 
Mary Menday . 
Jennett Gilford, widow 
David Griffith . . 
Thomas, Morgan 
Evan Jones 
Howell Bevan . 



1 Administration of his goods was granted at Carmarthen, on 24 May, 
1687, to his widow. Charity Higgon. 

* Vicar of Treffgarne. 

' Probably of Haverfordwest; administration of his goods was 
granted at Carmarthen, on 27 Jan., 1690-1. 



[To be continued in Vol. X.]